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Posts Tagged ‘Davies’ Confectionery’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 24, 2009

By Kathleen Kear

Community members and guests filled Black Diamond Community Center where they enjoyed a kickoff event celebrating Black Diamond’s 50th anniversary of being a city. — Photos by Ron Olness.

Quickly running through their regular city council meeting agenda on Thursday, February 19, at the Black Diamond Community Center, Mayor Howard Botts—along with Mayor Pro Tem Rebecca Olness and Councilmembers Goeff Bowie, Bill Boston, Leih Mulvihill, and Kristine Hanson—turned his attention to the kickoff event that will begin a year-long celebration of Black Diamond’s 50th anniversary as a city. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2013

By JoAnne Matsumura

The Confectionery, circa 1940, with the emergency siren, now on display at the museum, on the roof. The Show Hall is at right.

The Confectionery, circa 1940, with the emergency siren, now on display at the museum, on the roof. The Show Hall is at right.

It’s the children, many now in their 70s and 80s, who remember Alice Davies, the proprietor of the Confectionery. They’d flock to her store, located across the street from the museum, to buy penny candy—often with just a single penny to spend.

The various candies were displayed on top of a long display case. After you made your choice, Alice would put your candy in a small paper bag in exchange for your penny. But there wasn’t much time to make your choice—especially if you wanted to catch the free movie at the Show Hall after school on Thursdays.

At other times children lingered—it wasn’t easy to choose from the more than 60 penny candies. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 24, 1959

Cracker-barrel confab: Three town officials elected when Black Diamond incorporated as a fourth-class city last Tuesday, held a post-election conference in the town grocery store. From left, Mrs. Gertrude Botts, council member; Frank Costi, city treasurer and ex-officio city clerk, and Gomers Evans, Jr., councilman. Two of Mrs. Botts’ six children, David, 3, and Connie, 5, were in the foreground. The incorporation was a major step in efforts to rejuvenate the town, once a coal-mining center. —Times staff photo by John T. Closs.

Cracker-barrel confab: Three town officials elected when Black Diamond incorporated as a fourth-class city last Tuesday, held a post-election conference in the town grocery store. From left, Mrs. Gertrude Botts, council member; Frank Costi, city treasurer and ex-officio city clerk, and Gomers Evans, Jr., councilman. Two of Mrs. Botts’ six children, David, 3, and Connie, 5, were in the foreground. The incorporation was a major step in efforts to rejuvenate the town, once a coal-mining center.
—Times staff photo by John T. Closs.

By John J. Reddin, Times Staff Reporter

BLACK DIAMOND, Jan. 24 — This once booming coal-mining town, now “just another wide spot in the road,” is being given a taste of “Operation Bootstrap” by a group of spirited residents and merchants.

And, like a sick patient responding to a shot of adrenalin, the sleepy town is feeling the effects of its unexpected awakening.

Black Diamond virtually has stood still since the mid-1920s, when a strike closed several of the larger coal mines. A decrease in the demand for coal also has contributed to the “economic bust.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Summer 2013

By Ken Jensen

Lily English clasps the hands of James, at left, and Jerry as they wait for word from the Landsburg Mine. The mother and her boys have shown great courage throughout the ordeal since the accident happened. (Seattle P-I, January 9, 1954.)

Lily English clasps the hands of James, at left, and Jerry as they wait for word from the Landsburg Mine. The mother and her boys have shown great courage throughout the ordeal since the accident happened. (Seattle P-I, January 9, 1954.)

Alice Davies, the proprietor of the Confectionery, told 11-year-old Jerry English that he needed to go home—that his mother needed him. That was the first indication that something was wrong. Really wrong.

It was January 7, 1954, and Jerry’s father, Harry J. English, was trapped in a cave-in at the Landsburg Mine near Ravensdale. After 4 long hours Harry’s 25-year-old partner, Roy Coutts of Cumberland, was dug out, but there was no sign of Harry. Hope was fading fast….

“Harry told me that he would drill one more rock and then eat lunch,” Roy told The Seattle Times. “Then the bottom fell out from under us. I grabbed at a timber, but it fell, too.” Roy ended up at the bottom of a coal chute and then was immediately covered by a second cave-in. (more…)

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By C.M. (Rip) Johnson

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, June 1996

As a child growing up during the depression in the town of Black Diamond, I found it to be both an enjoyable and rewarding experience.

It showed how people in a small community with meager means could work and pull together and still provide their children with various types of entertainment plus teaching responsibility. We had values as guidelines and were taught respect by our parents and other adults.

Through our parents’ community club the kids were offered two free movies a week, a big Christmas celebration with children up to the age of 14 receiving gifts plus a sack containing peanuts, a box of candy plus an apple and orange. The older teens hung around until the end of the program to pick up a sack of goodies.

Lake 12

We did a lot of swimming at our local Lake 12 Resort.

During the summer months we had a large 4th of July and Labor Day celebration which offered every kind of entertainment imaginable.

We also had a huge summer picnic at one of our local lake resorts.

Black Diamond had community baseball and soccer teams who provided great entertainment. (more…)

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