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Posts Tagged ‘Denny-Renton Clay and Coal Co.’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 19, 1906

Pacific Coast Co. and Northern Pacific may come under provisions which prohibit carriers operating plants

Shipments outside Washington forbidden by the operators, but Hill line will me most seriously hurt by rule; Piles made fight to help local industries and Portland coal market to suffer if supply must be cut off

If the House agrees to the amendment made by the United States senate, forbidding common carriers from hauling coal mined in their own properties to points outside the state, the Pacific Coast Company and Northern Pacific will be seriously affected.

It was to save the coal properties of these two lines that United States Senator S.H. Piles is understood to have introduced his amendment exempting lines whose principal business is not that of a common carrier.

Just how this would have helped the Northern Pacific is not clear, but it would have been of some advantage to the Pacific Coast Company. That it was lost is believed by railroad men to have been due to the necessity for regulating the anthracite roads. The Pacific Coast Company can probably escape the provisions of the bill, but it will be a more expensive task to market the coal of that corporation. The Northern Pacific is expected to be compelled to limit its market to this state. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, January 20, 1912

One of the Denny-Renton plants at Renton.

One of the Denny-Renton plants at Renton.

No review of Seattle’s industrial enterprises and activities would be complete without an adequate mention of the Denny-Renton Clay & Coal Company, one of the largest enterprises of its kind in the world. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2000

By Barbara Nilson • Photos by Sherrie Acker

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Bill and Irene (Maes) Bogh, Tahoma class Taylor class of 1939, at the Taylor program.

Taylor as a company town was discussed at the reunion Oct. 17. Dale Sandhei said he thought they had it better than a lot of people at that time—they had a sewer system, pumped in water, electricity, and the coal was delivered to their homes.

The company was very benevolent; they built a swimming pool and cleaned it out once a year. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 20, 1927

Three towns will be served by splendid structure in Union District on Cedar River

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

The photograph shows the new $65,000 structure in which a Taylor-Hobart-Maplevalley union high school will open tomorrow, and Earl D. Bonham, superintendent of the district.

Like a youngster who appears wearing his first long trousers, the Seattle community shows its rapid growth by definite new things. Just as such a boy surprises you some morning, so do pleasant surprises like the new Union High School at Maplevalley, hit the observer with not unpleasant frequency.

The Tahoma High School opens tomorrow in a $65,000 building a mile east of Maplevalley, and twenty-nine miles from downtown Seattle.

All that region, which is tapped by the Cedar River, along which is a paved road almost to the town of Maplevalley, is on the rise. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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