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Posts Tagged ‘depots’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 10, 1983

by Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train In Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester depot, the 97-year-old railroad station in the Cascade Mountains, has been sold by the Burlington Northern Railroad to a Woodinville developer, Wayne Farrer Jr., for $1.

The sale was made with the stipulation that the building would be removed from the BN property by Feb. 1. What Farrer intends to do with the building was not indicated and he could not be reached yesterday for comment.

The depot has been a subject of major interest among historically minded people who feel that it should be saved as a memorial of a time when the first railroad line was punched across the Cascade Mountains opening the Puget Sound area to direct communication with the East. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, August 3, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban bureau

Neely Mansion

Neely Mansion, located on the Auburn-Black Diamond Road, was built in 1894. The building is in the National Register of Historic Places and was the second structure placed on the county register of landmarks.

The future of two structures intimately connected to the development and early settlement in King County may hinge on two separate meetings to be held this month.

The first will be at the Auburn City Hall Monday at 7:30 p.m. when people interested in the fate of the Neely Mansion, tied to the early settlement of the Green River Valley, will meet to see if something can be done about continuing a restoration project which has been halted for lack of funds.

The second meeting will be that of the county’s Landmarks Commission, Aug. 11 at 11 a.m. in the eighth-floor conference room of the Alaska Building, Seattle, when a decision will be made on whether the railroad depot in the Cascade Mountain town of Lester should be recognized as a county landmark. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1983

By Herb Balanger
Times South bureau

The Lester train depot was 52 years old when this picture was taken in 1940 for the King County tax assessor’s office. It is one of thousands being processed and filed by the Regional State Archives center In Burien. Numbers at the left identify when the picture was taken (June 19, 1940) and the assessor’s file number; numbers at the bottom indicate section, township and page in the assessor’s log book and tax lot number; Depot #9 indicates it is the building number In the group belonging to the railroad.

The Lester train depot was 52 years old when this picture was taken in 1940 for the King County tax assessor’s office. It is one of thousands being processed and filed by the Regional State Archives center in Burien. Numbers at the left identify when the picture was taken (June 19, 1940) and the assessor’s file number; numbers at the bottom indicate section, township and page in the assessor’s log book and tax lot number; Depot #9 indicates it is the building number in the group belonging to the railroad.

A group of volunteers from the Association of King County Historical Organizations has been hard at work since March trying to preserve what Mike Saunders, archivist, considers “the most comprehensive countywide local history photo collection in the state.”

The work, being done at the Regional State Archives in the former Sunset Junior High School in Highline, will probably be completed in September. Saunders said.

The job involves going through 70,000 to 90,000 negatives from the county assessor’s files dating from a Works Progress Administration project of 1936–1940, in which all the real property in the county was inventoried. Additional photos were taken through 1973 updating the changes to the buildings. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 21, 1902

Burglars secure stamps to the value of $350 and small amount of cash

The Confectionery, circa 1940, with the emergency siren, now on display at the museum, on the roof. The Show Hall is at right.

The Confectionery, circa 1940, was the site of the post office robbery in 1902. Today the building is the home to Black Diamond Pizza & Deli.

BLACK DIAMOND, Saturday, June 21.—The post office safe was blown open last night or early this morning and rifled. Three hundred and fifty dollars’ worth of stamps was taken.

Postmaster Charles McKinnon discovered the robbery when he arrived at the post office at 6:30 this morning. The office is located in the back part of a store and the store also sustained a loss of $10 in cash from the register, and a small amount of candy from the show case. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, April 29, 1970

By Gene Woodwick

Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway’s Engine No. 2, the D.H. Gilman, photographed on Independence Day, 1895.

Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway’s Engine No. 2, the D.H. Gilman, photographed on Independence Day, 1895.

The recent merger of the railroads will soon affect the rail system through the Issaquah and Snoqualmie Valleys.

Eighty-one years ago the big news in both valleys was that the railroads were coming through. Now there would be a way to ship the hops, dairy, and forest products to markets and the area could really be opened for settlement.

In 1885 the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad company was formed by some citizens in Seattle, headed by Daniel Heine Gilman. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, February 26, 1893

The Hanson-Turnbull wedding: A “hard times” entertainment

The likely location of the ball was the Masonic Lodge (left of center, ca. 1915). The photographer was looking up Baker St. toward Third Ave. (The Congregational Church is to the right; St. Barbara’s in the background.) Today’s Masonic Hall resides in the same location.

The Masonic Hall, left of center, ca. 1915. The photographer was looking up Baker St. toward Third Ave. (The Congregational Church is to the right; St. Barbara’s in the background.) Today’s Masonic Hall resides in the same location.

Mr. Alexander G. Hanson and Miss Jeanie J. Turnbull were married in the Masonic hall at Black Diamond on Tuesday evening by Rev. H.T. Shepard. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 2, 1995

By Stephen Clutter
Seattle Times south bureau

Carl Steiert, an expert on Black Diamond’s history, pauses recently in the Black Diamond Historical Museum, which he helped form in 1974.

Carl Steiert, an expert on Black Diamond’s history, pauses recently in the Black Diamond Historical Museum, which he helped form in 1974.

BLACK DIAMOND — It’s a sunny morning in this rural town in southeast King County. An earthmover rumbles deliberately along a hill where coal mines once flourished. Carpenters are busy. New houses are being built. People are moving in.

On a bench at the Black Diamond Historical Museum sits Carl Steiert, dressed in his overalls and well-oiled work boots, watching it all.

Steiert, 84, is an essential element of a town changing as rapidly as Black Diamond. He’s not a politician or college-educated scholar. He’s a walking, talking archive, and there’s a move afoot to preserve him. (more…)

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