Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Diamond Cement’

Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, February 24, 1929

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English; purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton; research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

Men who have made the new plant possible: 1—Wylie Hemphill, vice president and sales manager, and W.H. Green, plant manager. 2—Executives of cement company and affiliated companies. Left are, Carl English, purchasing agent; S.E. Hutton, research engineer; Thomas Reeder, assistant sales manager, Pacific Coast Coal Company; Walter Barnum, president Pacific Coast Company; E.F. De Grandpre, manager company hotels and real estate; E.C. Ward, vice president; Mr. Green; N.D. Moore, vice president; Ray Smith. engineer; H.M. Watkins, secretary and treasurer; A.F. Marion, manager steamship and engineering companies; W.A. Wilson, superintendent of mines; Darwin Meisnest, assistant sales manager cement company, and Mr. Hemphill. 3—Mr. Hemphill, Mr. Meisnest, and Ray Larson, Anchorage, Alaska, with latter signing order for first shipment to Alaska.

First carload is sent on its way in record time

Gratifying accomplishment is recorded in ten months; Seattle leaders watch first shipment go

Rivaling the exploits of Aladdin’s genie, is the accomplishment of the officials of the Pacific Coast Cement Company, whose big, million-barrel capacity Portland cement plant made its first shipment of Diamond Cement last Friday, just ten months from the date that construction of the plant started on the twenty-acre site which it occupies on East Marginal Way. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the BDHS Bulletin, Winter 2016

By William Kombol

PCC228

Loaded train in Franklin, 1902

The town of Franklin was developed for coal mining and operated as a company town from around 1885 to 1922. At its peak there were approximately 1,100 people living and working in Franklin. The town’s beginning and purpose were linked to 50-million-year-old coal seams exposed along the deep gorge cut through bedrock.

Explorers discovered the coal while traveling through the Green River Gorge in the early 1880s leading to the founding of nearby Black Diamond. The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad was extended from Renton to Franklin in 1885 allowing coal production to commence and the town to develop. The town was named for the famed American patriot, Benjamin Franklin. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By JoAnne Matsumura

Ernest Moore was born in the coal-mining town of Franklin, Wash. "If there's any other job, you'd be better off taking that other job." (Greg Gilbert / Seattle Times)

Ernest Moore was born in the coal-mining town of Franklin, Wash. “If there’s any other job, you’d be better off taking that other job.” (Greg Gilbert / Seattle Times)

He was an owner of a coal mine, a pump man, and a mule skinner; he was a proficient shoeshine boy and a gracious porter; he picked moss and ferns and cut logs in the woods; and he served on a rescue team at the Gorge and as an Army quartermaster during World War II.

He once took a job in a foundry and another paving asphalt roads; he had two children and was a father figure to 30 more; he was an interesting storyteller—and he even wrote a book about it all.

He was Ernest “Ernie” Roy Moore, Sr., an African-American, third generation coal miner who was born in Franklin, Washington, on May 5, 1912. (more…)

Read Full Post »