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Posts Tagged ‘Diamond Stage Co.’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 20, 2007

The former railroad depot, built in 1886, in Black Diamond now houses the Historical Society Museum. Down Railroad Avenue the current book store is visible. It has also been King’s Tavern. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Featured speaker at the Maple Valley Reunion, Sunday, Feb. 25th, will be Mayor Howard Botts of Black Diamond. The 1 p.m. program at the Grange Hall on Highway 169 at 216th is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Mayor Botts, who was born and raised in Black Diamond, will relate the histories of the two towns and how they have been connected over the years by the highway, the railroad, once upon a time, as well as other similarities. He’ll also discuss, “what is coming down the road; hopefully, new homes and new businesses.”

He said, “It is always interesting to talk about my home town.” Botts has served as mayor for 24 years and before that served several terms on the City Council in the 1960s and then during the 1970s, he was a member of the Planning Community. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 23, 1925

Trained Mine Rescue teams from each of the camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company will compete for honors at Black Diamond, Saturday, July 25. The engraving shows Joe Meza, one of the Black Diamond team. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 2, 1995

By Stephen Clutter
Seattle Times south bureau

Carl Steiert, an expert on Black Diamond’s history, pauses recently in the Black Diamond Historical Museum, which he helped form in 1974.

Carl Steiert, an expert on Black Diamond’s history, pauses recently in the Black Diamond Historical Museum, which he helped form in 1974.

BLACK DIAMOND — It’s a sunny morning in this rural town in southeast King County. An earthmover rumbles deliberately along a hill where coal mines once flourished. Carpenters are busy. New houses are being built. People are moving in.

On a bench at the Black Diamond Historical Museum sits Carl Steiert, dressed in his overalls and well-oiled work boots, watching it all.

Steiert, 84, is an essential element of a town changing as rapidly as Black Diamond. He’s not a politician or college-educated scholar. He’s a walking, talking archive, and there’s a move afoot to preserve him. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, November 23, 1922

Cedar Grange wins in long fight for safe crossing over Milwaukee railroad tracks at Maplevalley

Milwaukee_RR_logoSeventeen months after the first agitation for the elimination of the dangerous grade crossing at Maplevalley, the new overhead bridge across the Milwaukee railroad was completed and opened for traffic Wednesday morning, Nov. 15.

Grange deserves credit

Cedar Grange fired the opening gun in the fight for a safe crossing with a resolution which was passed by that organization on June 23, 1921, and presented to the State Board of Public Works, the King County commissioners, and the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway.

For almost a year and a half the fight for the bridge was kept up by Cedar Grange and the Maplevalley Messenger. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 31, 1974

Carl Steiert

Carl Steiert

Carl Steiert, owner of Black Diamond Garage, is retiring at the end of the month after 43 years working at the first and only job he ever held.

Forty-three years ago as a youngster right out of high school, in 1931, he started working for the old Diamond Stage Company which owned the Black Diamond shop and also had one in Maple Valley.

In 1948 the stage lines were sold to Renton Stages. Steiert bought into the company at that time and the name of the Black Diamond location was changed to Diamond Garage. By 1953 Steiert had become sole owner.

“He has enjoyed it all the time,” his wife Ann, who has been bookkeeper and receptionist during the years, explains. “He lives and breathes cars.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, October 19, 1991

As a worker adds a final spot of paint, historian Carl Steiert gazes at the newly reopened Green River Gorge Bridge, which stands 155 feet above the water and is a link to the Black Diamond area’s colorful past. (Photo: Dean J. Koepfler)

As a worker adds a final spot of paint, historian Carl Steiert gazes at the newly reopened Green River Gorge Bridge, which stands 155 feet above the water and is a link to the Black Diamond area’s colorful past. (Photo: Dean J. Koepfler)

By Bart Ripp

The bridge, deep in the woods of South King County, eavesdrops on a roar few hear.

Once a teeming tourist destination, lately a solemn sentry over cascades and canyons, the Green River Gorge Bridge has reopened after being closed for four years. A $2.8 million project by King County rehabilitated the bridge and its distinct history.

The Green River Gorge Bridge is the only structure of its kind in King County. In bridge parlance, it is a Baltimore Petit truss bridge. In terms less engineering, the bridge is a link to a time when people did not leave their home county to go on a trip.

The original bridge was built in the late 1880s, to link the coal mining communities of Black Diamond, still a thumping town, and Cumberland, Bayne and Palmer, which have gone to blackberries and alders. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, February 1988

By Ann Steiert

Black Diamond stores, circa 1885. Photo courtesy of Ruth Stowe.

Black Diamond stores, circa 1885. Photo courtesy of Ruth Stowe.

As we have been exploring the history of Railroad Ave. and the businesses that have been on it over the years, we have been told many times that the first store was a log building located where the present saloon [the empty former book store] now stands.

We were told that the when the need for a larger building was felt, the then owners simply built their new building up around the first store and used the old building for firewood as they needed it. (more…)

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