Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘doctors’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 16, 1924

Now in its third successful year of operation, the Mine Council system of collective bargaining as worked out by the employees and officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company is functioning to the entire satisfaction of all parties concerned. The group shown herewith is the Central Council, composed of representatives from each of the Mine Councils, which meets in Seattle once each month. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 8, 1924

Not a feminine foot faltered when the guides for this group of King County P.T.A. members led the way into the dark recesses of the Primrose Tunnel at Newcastle. These women, a portion of 300 who recently visited Newcastle Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, here saw firsthand the actual processes of coal mining.

The guides for this group were, Dan Carey, Jas. E. Ash, and Phillip Chase, all of the Engineering Department. John Eck, fireboss in charge of the operations at Primrose, is kneeling at the left. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 3, 1924

Because of the steep pitch of the main slopes in some of the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company it is necessary to use covers on the cars in which the coal is hoisted to prevent it being scattered along the slope on the way to the tipple.

In the picture above is shown a new type of cover invented and patented by W.B. Walker of Newcastle. This cover is so designed that it telescopes along the side of the car when not in use. The picture shows the cover folded back and also covering the loaded coal. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Globe-News, March 19, 1976

Can you believe this is what our present museum building looked like in 1976 when our original “work parties” began? Left to right: Louis Zumek, Chuck Holtz, Carl Steiert, and Archie Eltz. (BDHS calendar series, 1986)

Can you believe this is what our present museum building looked like in 1976 when our original “work parties” began? Left to right: Louis Zumek, Chuck Holtz, Carl Steiert, and Archie Eltz. (BDHS calendar series, 1986)

Restoration of the circa 1885 train depot on Railroad Avenue in Black Diamond slowed down during cold weather, said Ann Steiert, member of Black Diamond Historical Society.

“Volunteers have been working on shoring up the foundation and as soon as the weather breaks they will finish jacking it up, put in some new timbers, and a concrete footing.

“We have applied for a grant from Washington Historical Society to make the depot into a museum, but the bulk of our working funds have come from the sale of our 13-month historical calendar. We have $1,500 to go toward furnishing and framing the interior.”

Ms. Steiert said the museum depot was most likely the first structure in Black Diamond when the Welsh miners from Nortonville, Calif., came to mine in Black Diamond.

“They probably pitched their tents around the depot before they built cabins,” she said. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 6, 1923

During the month of October, when the mines broke all known records in the production of coal, the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Wenatchee depot turned in one of the best months in its history.

The view above shows the yard office at Wenatchee, with George Glann, veteran of 17 years, and the yard foreman, standing near the entrance. H.H. Boyd is the agent at Wenatchee, and his aggressiveness is resulting in the wide distribution of this company’s product throughout that district. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 15, 1923

Surrounded by trees and well removed from the noise and grime of the mine operations, the Pacific Coast Coal Company Hospital at Black Diamond presents the appearance of a well-kept bungalow rather than that of a medical or surgical institution.

A peek into the interior gives another reason why the men who require hospital attention prefer the Black Diamond hospital to any available in Seattle. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »