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Posts Tagged ‘Duwamish River’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 3, 1959

HANSON DAMSITE: At Eagle Gorge, on the Green River, 30 miles southeast of Seattle, work started today on the long-planned Howard A. Hanson Dam. The broken line indicates where the crest of the dam will cross the narrow valley, creating a lake eight miles long and impounding 106,000 acre-feet of flood waters. Poring over maps indicating the area to be covered in excavation and subsequent construction were, from left, James J. Grafton, resident engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, and two surveyors, Louis Zumek for the Army Engineers and Andrew McDermott for the Henry J. Kaiser Co. and Raymond International, joint contractors.

HANSON DAMSITE: At Eagle Gorge, on the Green River, 30 miles southeast of Seattle, work started today on the long-planned Howard A. Hanson Dam. The broken line indicates where the crest of the dam will cross the narrow valley, creating a lake eight miles long and impounding 106,000 acre-feet of flood waters. Poring over maps indicating the area to be covered in excavation and subsequent construction were, from left, James J. Grafton, resident engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, and two surveyors, Louis Zumek for the Army Engineers and Andrew McDermott for the Henry J. Kaiser Co. and Raymond International, joint contractors.

The final step in a long-deferred flood-control project, construction of the Howard A. Hanson Dam on Green River, got under way today.

Dean H. Eastman, president of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce and vice president of the Northern Pacific Railway Co., threw a switch setting off a blast of dynamite. L. Costello, member of a civic committee organized by the late Mr. Hanson to urge dam construction, moved the first shovelful of earth. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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By Morda C. Slauson, 1958

Thanksgiving of 1862 was celebrated royally in a log cabin on the Duwamish River. Jacob Maple, his sons and daughters and two young men, Henry Van Asselt and Luther W. Collins, sat at a rough board table and gave thanks for the safe completion of a long, dangerous journey and the reuniting of a family.

Jacob and his son, Samuel, who had first arrived on Puget Sound in 1851, had just returned from a trip to the middle west, bringing the rest of the family to become the first permanent settlers of the Duwamish valley.

Faded land deeds, relating to the Maple property, now owned by Boeing Airplane Company, are among the souvenirs of Seattle’s early years which are cherished by Mrs. Edith Cavanaugh, 16020 196th Ave., Maple Valley. Her late husband, Fred Cavanaugh, was born in 1871 in the family home on the present site of Boeing Field, son of Mary Ann Maple and Martin L. Cavanaugh. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, November 10, 1963

By Lucile McDonald

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

When this photograph was taken, water behind the masonry dam was at a low level. Line, about midway up, indicates high water level of the reservoir.

One of the curiosities uncovered during freeway construction was a tar-coated 40-inch steel pipe laid down the west side of Capital Hill. Two sections were dug out and discarded for scrap, the rest was plugged with cement and left buried in the slope.

Workmen who witnessed removal of this obstacle to the path of progress may not have known they were viewing the penstock which fed Cedar River water into the first electric power plant on Lake Union. The public has forgotten thoroughly the function of a small structure hemmed in by the King County Welfare Department’s medical service office and the City Light’s stand-by steam plant at Eastlake Avenue and Nelson Place.

The building is completely empty except for a table and chairs in a room used as a voting precinct once or twice a year. If you go around in back, you can see where Lake Union once lapped at the base of the rear wall and a tail race poured out water from the Volunteer Park reservoir after its force had driven the Pelton bucket wheel of the old electric generator inside the little building.

The pipes carried the reservoir overflow down the hill, one being the penstock and the other a drain, still in use, that had been relocated at a lower level.

Through these pipes, Cedar River water mingled with Lake Union and flowed out into Salmon Bay before there was a ship canal.

The Cedar has been much manipulated by man. Its water flows into hundreds of thousands of homes and the current it generates partially lights them. It supplies most of the make-up water needed to operate the ship canal’s Chittenden Locks. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

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Text and photos from the Howard A. Hanson Dam dedication program, May 12, 1962

Eagle Gorge Dam was renamed Howard A. Hanson by an act of Congress 28 July 1958, introduced by Congressman Thomas M. Pelly, and signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower 6 August 1958.

Many people worked long and hard to establish a flood-control project on the Green River in King County of Western Washington. One of these was Howard A. Hanson.

In addition to his many prior years of personal effort, he was, from 1947 until his death on 4 November 1957, a leader of civic and government groups actively seeking construction of the project. He organized and directed effective action leading to contributions by the state and King County totaling $2,000.000. (more…)

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