Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Easter’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 15, 1926

One of the institutions in Carbonado of which the camp is justly proud is the splendid Union Sunday School which recently passed the 100 mark in its membership. Mrs. J.W.L. Kaufman is the efficient superintendent of the Sunday School. She is assisted by a loyal corps of teachers and officers, all of whom are striving to make the organization even greater and better than it now is.

The Sunday School is undenominational, and it is unique in that all denominations and creeds represented are working in perfect harmony for the upbuilding of the religious and moral life of the community. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 8, 1926

Orchardists throughout the fruit districts of Eastern Washington depend upon Diamond Briquets to protect their blossoming trees from damage by frost. Consequently, this spring the Pacific Coast Coal Company conducted an extensive advertising campaign in the Yakima, Walla Walla, and Wenatchee districts, featuring Diamond Briquets as the ideal fuel for orchard heating.

This picture shows a window display arranged in Yakima, through the courtesy of the Yakima Daily Republic and the Yakima Morning Herald. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 1, 1926

Black Diamond has always maintained a reputation for turning out championship teams in baseball, but in the season which just closed, the camp held the distinction of honoring two soccer football teams, both of whom made splendid records.

In the group shown above are gathered the following players: Front row, left to right, “Chick” Thompson, Chas. “Red” Towers, A. Maroni, R. Durnac, John Ogden; second row, Chas. Maroni, Jas. Strang, Vic Roberts; back row, P.J. Gallagher, J.T. Hollow, and “Boots” Pierotti. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 16, 1925

Thousands of Diamond Briquets have been shipped into the Yakima Valley this spring to protect the blossoming fruit trees from damage due to killing frosts. Throughout the orchards of Eastern Washington more than one hundred thousand briquet heaters are now playing their part in the production of bumper crops by radiating the warm glow of red hot briquets against the heretofore invulnerable attacks of Jack Frost.

The scene depicted herewith shows a shipment of Diamond Briquets being unloaded at the yards of Western Fuel Company in Yakima. The trucks are loading fuel to go to the orchards. At the same time, while being so extensively burned in the fruit districts, briquets are continuing to grow in popularity for use in logging operations and for steam shovel use, to say nothing of domestic demand. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 9, 1925

Playing together for the first time this season, the soccer football squad at Newcastle has been one of the strong contenders for honors in the state league. The camp has loyally supported the boys and in turn the players have been a credit to the camp. One of the team, Bert Blondell, was chosen to play with the Washington All-Stars in the game against the All-Stars of Victoria, B.C.

In the picture, from left to right standing: Tim Riley, Jack Lucas, Don Campbell, Bert Blondell, Jock Clark, Jim Strang, Bob Gelling, Dave Forbes, Jimmy Walton, Joe Oschberger, and W.S. Hart. In front, left to right: Dan Minele, Bob Miles, C. Mikola, Arthur Kelly, Gus Lapsansky, Ted Jackson, captain of the team, Harold Phillips, Jim McCarthy, “Hen” Roberts. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 5, 1925

Before sailing from Seattle for the United Kingdom and the Continent this week, the S.S. Oklahoma of the French Line, Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, managed on the Pacific Coast by the General Steamship Corporation, filled her bunkers for the long voyage with steam coal from the Pacific Coast Coal Company. This vessel is one of a fleet of fine steamers owned by the French Line, including the Mississippi, Georgia, and Arizona, all of which ply in the Puget Sound service. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 24, 1924

Recently officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and representatives of Yakima Valley fruit growers conducted tests to determine the effectiveness of preventing damage to blossoming trees by the installation of Diamond Briquet burners in the orchards. The result was most satisfactory.

At the right in the above cut is shown an orchard scene with a briquet burner in the foreground. To the lower left is a truck load of Diamond Briquets being delivered in the orchard. The man in the driver’s seat is T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department. In the oval, from left to right, is N.D. Moore, vice-president Pacific Coast Coal Co.; Arthur Karr, Yakima Valley orchardist and inventor of the briquet burner; A.F. Marion, chief engineer Pacific Coast Coal Co.; T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department, and Bruce Dower of the John Dower Lumber Co., Yakima dealer for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 17, 1924

Bidding against the competition of eastern firms, the Pacific Coast Engineering Company, a subsidiary of The Pacific Coast Company, recently won the contract for the building of the Test Weight Car shown in the above engraving.

The car weighs 80,000 pounds and is used jointly by the states of Washington and Oregon for the testing of railroad scales. The body of the car is composed of two castings running lengthwise, each of which weighs 17 ½ tons. The name plate just over the wheel in the center of the picture reads, “Built by Pacific Coast Eng’r. Co., Seattle, Wash.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier Herald, March 31, 1988

Frank Zumek and Brad Darby display a smokehouse full of ready-to-eat Easter hams.

Frank Zumek and Brad Darby display a smokehouse full of ready-to-eat Easter hams.

Easter is traditionally ham time. Grocers and local meat markets are preparing for the increase in sales, while shoppers are weighing the price differences and deciding which type of ham they’ll bake.

Ham, a form of pork, comes with and without a bone. Customers make their choice based on convenience, cost and taste, local meat merchants say. (more…)

Read Full Post »