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Posts Tagged ‘Easton’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 14, 1899

New steel rails from Lester to the mountains

M. Dempsey, superintendent of construction of this division of the Northern Pacific, in speaking of the physical condition of that road says:

“We have just completed putting in new steel rails from Lester to Palmer and from Easton to the foot of the mountain. We do not anticipate any more trouble in the tunnels. No. 1, just west of Easton will be permanently abandoned, and the work of construction brick arches within the other is being pushed. There are four tunnels which remain to be arched, and the work on all of them will be completed before winter sets in.”

Mr. Dempsey says that the Northern Pacific is being handicapped in construction work along its line on account of the scarcity of railroad laborers, and that some of the work now In hand has been practically suspended until laborers shall have returned from the hop fields.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 24, 1953

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Crash sites: Cross at left designates where the wreckage of a C-46 transport plane was sighted today, less than a mile from the site of the April 14 crash (right cross) of a DC-3 in which six died and 19 survived. The area is near Cedar Lake in South Central King County. Four crew members were aboard the C-46. Two survivors were rescued.

Searchers today found the wreckage and two survivors of a C-46 transport that crashed early yesterday on a 4,200-foot ridge, less than a mile from where a DC-3 struck the Cascades foothills April 14. Two other men aboard the C-46 were dead.

The wreckage of the twin-engined, 40-passenger plane lay in timber on the snowy slopes of the ridge, a mile southwest of Cedar Lake in the Cedar River watershed of South Central King County. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 23, 1953

Troop ferry last heard over Easton

A Seattle-bound nonscheduled C-46 airliner vanished over the Stampede Pass area of the Cascades early today. The plane carried four men.

The two-engine American Air Transport, Inc., plane sent its last message over Easton, on the east slope of the Cascades, at 12:47 o’clock. The pilot reported everything was normal. The plane was due at Boeing Field at 1:05. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 30, 1980

Maple Valley RR station
Maple Valley’s first railroad station, built in 1887 for the Columbia and Puget Sound Railroad Company. The Milwaukee Road did not come through Maple Valley until 1907. Hence the station was evidently in a considerable different location than the two which replaced it.

At the time this photograph was taken, the track was narrow gauge, probably three feet between the rails, as compared to the standard gauge of 4 feet, 8 ½ inches in use on American railroads today. The Columbia and Puget Sound was purchased by the Pacific Coast Coal Company about 1897 and renamed the Pacific Coast Railroad.

It remained as such until the Burlington Northern merger in 1970, despite the face that in 1952 the Great Northern purchased the railroad and operated it as a separate company. (Photo courtest Maple Valley Historical Society.)

(Editor’s note: The Milwaukee Railroad ran its last train through Maple Valley on March 15 and a significant historical era ended. In this series of articles, beginning below, Dave Sprau, Burlington Northern train dispatcher, recalls the often turbulent past and, to many valleyites, the sad present.)

By Dave Sprau
Installment I

At 4 p.m., Friday, April 4, 1980, Burlington Northern Agent Ralph Ozura locked the door on the Maple Valley station and went home for the last time.

Unlike other days, no “night man“ showed up to relieve Ralph and keep the station operating on its previous 24-hour, seven-day-per-week basis. An era had ended. (more…)

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This 1908 photo is from Central Washington University’s Brooks Library Digital Collection, http://digital.lib.cwu.edu/.

Green River Hot Springs

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January 2010

By Ken Jensen

Being a relative newcomer to Black Diamond and a self-proclaimed history buff, I’m constantly peppering Archivist JoAnne Matsumura, President Keith Watson, and others with questions about the area’s history: Where was Mine No. 7? How did trains turn around in Franklin? Where was the town of McKay? Some of my queries can be resolved simply by checking out an old publication; others by checking in with an old-timer. Some take a little more digging.

Matsumura suggested such a challenge. A little-known town—a town a bit outside the usual Black Diamond Historical Society purview—but one of great interest to Matsumura (she collects postcards from the once remarkable hotel) and Vice President Don Malgarini (he spent summers there whiling away his childhood): Green River Hot Springs.

(more…)

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