Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Elks’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 10, 1925

Richard Goodhead, mine foreman at Burnett, has been a miner in this state almost as long as coal has been dug here. He has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Burnett since the mine reopened several years ago, and prior to that time was at Franklin and Hyde mines.

Loyal to the company, and loyal to the men under him, he has built up the reputation of being a “Square-Shooter,” and a practical mining man. Proof of the esteem in which he is held is shown by the fact that his friends all call him “Dick.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 3, 1925

I’m a coal miner for the same reason that you’re in business. To make a living.

Work in a coal mine is preferable to a job out-of-doors. Neither heat nor cold affect me, and the hazard is less than in railroading or window-washing.

I want my family to live in an American community, where American ideals prevail; where modern schools, churches, and a wholesome community spirit are present.

I want to work where there is not constant friction between employer and employee; where I can get fair play and a square deal.

In the coal mines, the state has one of its greatest natural resources. I want to help develop this industry; that commerce and manufacturing may prosper, and to keep this state free of a foreign fuel dependence.

Work in the coal mines of Washington gives me an opportunity to contribute to the upbuilding of the Pacific Northwest. I spend my money here for food, for clothes, automobiles and radios. You buy the coal which I mine and I’ll continue to add to your wealth as you promote my prosperity.

R.J. Miller
Newcastle coal miner

Washington coal mines expend more than twenty million dollars annually for payrolls and supplies! (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 19, 1925

Shortly before the tunnel work was completed in the New Black Diamond Mine last month, Manager of Mines D.C. Botting arranged for the mine superintendents and supervisors from each of the camps to inspect the property.

In addition to going over the New Black Diamond property the party also visited the Briquet Plant, where the process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets was witnessed first hand. The picture shows the group on the trestle leading from the mine entrance to the tipple and bunkers under construction. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 12, 1925

During the summer months H.H. Boyd, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s agency in Wenatchee, prepared for a big season this winter. He had the storage bins of the Wenatchee yard remodeled to permit a quicker and more economical handling of the coal. This view is from the east side, showing how the railroad cars are unloaded. Trucks can drive directly over the tracks and into the bins. Mr. Boyd is a popular citizen of Wenatchee, prominent in lodge and civic affairs. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 5, 1925

Near the foot of Queen Anne Hill, corner of Taylor Avenue and Roy Street, P.J. Emt has a coal yard to which he is attracting city-wide attention. Some time ago he erected at one corner of the yard an exact replica of a fireplace, with a brick chimney, basket grate, and tile front.

Grouped before the grate are two settees upon which are often seated numbers of the neighborhood children, while before them blazes cheerily a fire of Diamond Briquets. This fire lasts all through the night, so that workmen going to their tasks before dawn, have commented upon the lasting qualities of a fuel which, hours later, still glows so brightly as they pass. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 24, 1925

Though these men are not on jury duty no court could find a more impartial nor fair-minded group than the Black Diamond supervisors shown in the accompanying halftone. For confirmation of this statement just ask any miner or workman employed at the mine. The group, from left to right, includes, Jack Emmanuel, Richard Parry, Tom Edwards, E.D. Rockey, and Robt. Cruickshank. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 17, 1925

Everybody in Burnett knows something about First Aid work, but none are more expert than are the members of the Women’s First Aid Team. In the photograph they are shown demonstrating how to resuscitate a person overcome by gas or drowning. Mrs. F.A. White is the captain of the team, the other members including, Mrs. L.G. Payne, Mrs. Frank Seltenreich, Mrs. James Smith, Mrs. A.L. McBlaine, Mrs. L.G. Bean, and Mrs. J.L. Hill. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »