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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 13, 1948

Army engineers finish valve system

By Fergus Hoffman

Penstock valves: Like the glowering mouths of naval guns, the polished valves of Mud Mountain’s three 8-foot penstocks jut from beneath the control tower built into the solid rock of the outlet gorge. The penstocks, one on top and two below, are carried in, a 2,000-foot-long tunnel which is rammed straight through the solid mountain rock beside the dam. When this picture was made, only one of the three valves was open, jutting its terrific force against the canyon wall. (U. S. Army Corps or Engineers photo by R. A. Lee.)

Like the glowering mouths of naval guns, the polished valves of Mud Mountain’s three 8-foot penstocks jut from beneath the control tower built into the solid rock of the outlet gorge. The penstocks, one on top and two below, are carried in, a 2,000-foot-long tunnel which is rammed straight through the solid mountain rock beside the dam. When this picture was made, only one of the three valves was open, jutting its terrific force against the canyon wall. (U. S. Army Corps of Engineers photo by R. A. Lee.)

MUD MOUNTAIN DAM, June 12.—Like a thousand crystal geysers rocketing into canyon sunlight from a 2,000-foot torpedo tube, the White River is earning its name today.

Thunderously white, spurting and spraying against the cliffs of a narrow gorge with-rock-polishing force, the White River has been tamed by Mud Mountain Dam, but the taming has dramatized the hitherto prosaic mountain stream which once posed an annual flood threat to the downstream valley.

Now, after 10 years of work and 12 million dollars in financing, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has control of the river, this last step due to completion this week of the valve system.

Only one valve, controlling one of the three eight-foot penstocks—or pipes, is open. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, June 7, 1964

By Rod Cardwell

Mike Raikovich, Cumberland innkeeper, dispenses suds to the thirsty. – Photos by TNT’s Warren Anderson.

Mike Raikovich, Cumberland innkeeper, dispenses suds to the thirsty. – Photos by TNT’s Warren Anderson.

It was a busy day for the people who dwell in the big cedar woods close by the quick waters of the Green River, a short drive north out of King County’s Enumclaw.

Just back from Las Vegas, white-haired Ruby Millerin was hanging out her wash and scanning the forest for a frequent caller at her home … a chubby bear that lumbers up to the back door.

And a number of the most important citizens of Cumberland were huddled around a hole in the ground next to Mike Raikovich’s tavern … deeply engrossed in the progress of a well being dug for the vibrant Mike, who was born under the flag of Austro-Hungary. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 1, 1953

Line paintingThe long-familiar “Yellow Streak” which motorists have followed on Washington’s highways is being purged. Painting machines of the State Highway Department are busy covering the yellow lines with a fresh new “White Line.”

This picture shows the machine on Enumclaw’s Cole Street last Friday as it prepared to white line the streets which are also part of the state highway system. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, May 22, 1991

Many kayakers put in at the Green River Gorge and finish at the geyser.

Many kayakers put in at the Green River Gorge and finish at the geyser.

From the grassy fields of Flaming Geyser State Park near Auburn to the wild whitewater of Kanaskat-Palmer State Park, the Green River offers visitors to the Plateau a variety of activities, including fishing, swimming, rafting, or picnicking. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 3, 1946

Charmed land cities: Black DiamondMINING CENTER – Here is Black Diamond, supported almost exclusively for more than a half century by the extensive coal deposits in its environs. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2013

By Frank Hammock

Restaurants in historic buildings dish up heaping helpings of hospitality

Koerner’s Drug, 1925, now Black Diamond Pizza & Deli. (Courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis negative number 48373.)

Koerner’s Drug, 1925, now Black Diamond Pizza & Deli. (Courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis negative number 48373.)

In and around our community, several restaurants that reside in historic buildings have stood the test of time and rouse an interest in our area’s colorful past.

Many businesses have come and gone, but the buildings remain and continue to warm the hearts of those in search of a pinch of nostalgia with a dash of modern charm. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 4, 1963

Cumberland gymnasium

Cumberland school gymnasium, now Station 42 of the Enumclaw Fire Department/KCFD #28.

The mass meeting which was held in the Cumberland schoolhouse last Thursday night, and which was called for the purpose of finding ways and means of giving the town adequate fire protection, was well attended and gave promise of having its objectives attained in the very near future, according to a spokesman for the citizens.

For the past several years Cumberland has been an “orphan” in that during that time the area has been “out of bounds” for the three rural fire districts that encompass it. The three districts are Enumclaw, Black Diamond, and Palmer-Selleck. (more…)

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