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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 12, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

Robert Wingate directed a crew led by Frances Bisson that hewed ties for the “incline” from Carbonado down the side of the canyon at the Carbon River (ca. 1883).

Robert Wingate directed a crew led by Frances Bisson that hewed ties for the “incline” from Carbonado down the side of the canyon at the Carbon River (ca. 1883).

On December 9, 1899, 31 men lost their lives in an explosion at the Carbon Hill No. 7 Mine outside the town of Carbonado; they have been memorialized with a monument built at the cemetery and dedicated in 2002.

From 1899 through 1930, more than 100 men were killed in violent explosions and other disasters in the coal mines of Carbonado, Wilkeson, and Burnett.

The memorial was established by the Wilkeson Eagles Aerie No. 1409; the Carbonado Eagles Aerie merged with Wilkeson in 1924. It consists of a large chunk of Wilkeson sandstone weighing more than 2.5 tons with two plaques, one dedicated to those who lost their lives and the other lists the major mine disasters in the Carbon River coal country.

Chunks of coal surround the memorial that is just a few yards away from many of the graves of the miners in the cemetery established in 1880. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 8, 1963

Black Diamond Bakery at sundown.BLACK DIAMOND — Oh, the luscious smell of baking bread! And from the only wood-fired bake oven in the state. George Eipper, 79; Frank Dawson, younger, and Mrs. Margurite LeRoy, with the world of King County beating a path to their door, as the saying is.

King Coal once ruled Black Diamond and the town was known far and wide for a mine more than 1,500 feet below sea level. The king may not be exactly dead, but “black diamonds” no longer are important to the town (pop. 1,035).

In the olden days it was just hurry up the hill to work at one or another of the mines, but now it’s drive, drive, drive. To Boeing, Pacific Car, or the big lumber mill at Enumclaw. Maybe no more than a dozen working miners here now, and they are employed five miles out of town. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, November 29, 1918

honor-wwi

Dr. C.M. Allen
Joe Anicich
David Aphgreene
O.A. Berg
John Baardson
Grant Baker
Ira Baker
James Barnes
Alsin Barnes
James Barry
Tom Barry
Albert Benson
Harry Bengston
Ed Bengston*
Will Bentley
Norman Biles
William Blanchat
Clifford Blanchat
Joseph Blazina
Clarence Blessing
Will Bremer
Otto Brons
Arent Bruhn*
Rolf Bruhn*
Adelore Bureau
Charles Bureau
Wm. M. Burns
Joe Cammerano
Ray Carter
William Chaussee
Bennie Cichy
Pete Christensen
Andrew Christensen
Carrol Christiansen
Laurits Christensen
Bert Colson
Wilbert Conway
James Cushing
Joe Davey
Earl Dawes
Joseph Deluca
Peter Deluca
Fred Dibley
Fred Daggett
Roy Earley
Robert Eckhart
Cecil Englund
Lou Faldborg
Pete Faldborg
M.C. Ferguson
Lafayette Forler
Herbert Forler
Percy Forest
Dan Forest
Forrest M. Franks*
Peter Frisk
Roy Frick
Frank Ghiglone
Anton Gorc
Henry Gray
Howard Green
John Grennon
Walter Gross
Robert Gross
Alvin Hammer
Peter Hansen
Ray Hash
Otis Hash
Wm. Ham
George Haugen
Henry Haugen
W.E. Heidinger
John J. Hogan
John Holden
Ernest Holm
Stanley Hook
Peter Jensen
Oscaar Jensen
Odin Johnson
Alfred Johnson
Arthur Johnson
George Johnson
Floyd Johnson
Stanley Joubert
Ira Jones
Roy Jones
John P. Jones
Roy Kealy
Frank Kealy
George Kress
Leo Kress
William Knight
Lashue Krulikoski
Matt Krulikoski
Bert Krulikoski
Ole Kulberg, Jr.
Stanley Kurfurst
Leo Kurnikoski
George Lafromboise
Sam’l B. Lafromboise
Thorwald Larsen
Ignutz Laush
Ivan Lee
Robert Lee
Vernet Lee
Lando Lesman
Moses Leveck
John Lochridge
John Malneritch
Joe Malneritch
Raymond Manahan
Marion Marlin
George Martinelli
Martin Malneritch
M.P. Malneritch
J.V. Mazurkiewicz
Matt Medie
Angus McKinnon
Ray Milliken
Charles Mitchell
George Mitchell**
Joseph Moeller
Charles Moergell
Marius Mortensen
Frank Muchlinski, Jr.
Joe Muchlinski
Adam Murray
Harry Nelson
Peter G. Nielsen
Arlie Norris
Joe Pierce
Sam Palmquist
Albert Palmquist
Frank Pierce
Adraian Piquette
Ira G. Pearsall
Edmond Perrenoud
Louis Perrenoud
Gus Petereson
John Peterson
Hjalmar L. Peterson
Ray Prentiss
Andrew Rasmussen
Harry Reed
Walter Reed
Otto Reed
Erwin Rengstorff
Charles Rogers
Carl Sandnes
Lester Sims
Fred Shocky
Steven Sharin
Roy Siick
Abraham Smith
Mason D. Smith
Floyd W. Smith
Geroge Spagna
Peter Sorenson
Church Stephenson
Claude Stephenson
Jonah Stevens
Clarence Stout
Henry Sprouse
Walter Stockley
Joe Sturn
Adolph Tamm
Hans Thim
Axel Thim
Gladsone Toman
George Toman
W. W. Toman
Ira Tozer
Michael Twardoski
Leo Twardowski
Dr. F.G. Ulman
Ralph Uphus
Evan Uphus
Frank Van Hoof
Jay Van Patten
Matt Verhonic
Magnus Vestergaard*
John Walczak
Vincent Walczak
Arthur Wallace
Melvin Wilson
John Wizerieski
Frank Wiezerieski

*Died in the War
**Died in the War, Reported in 1919

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 9, 1922

Coming off shift in Newcastle.

Coming off shift in Newcastle.

These men who go down deep “the precious pearls to bring,” were just leaving the works when we flagged them. It was a hard job making them pose for this picture because the hot shower and the “Hot Meat” was waiting for them.

However, in order to oblige us, they stood for the monkey business—and here you are—a portion of the hard-hitting Newcastle crew of miners. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

By Brenda Sexton

krain-cemetery-familiesFor more than 120 years, members of the Catholic Church and community have been gathering at the Holy Family Cemetery in Krain at sunset to recite the Rosary and light candles on the graves of the dearly departed for the Feast of All Saints. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

By Brenda Sexton

Nearly every day at the Krain Corner Inn, owner Karen Hatch gets a history lesson.

Through the 22 years she’s owned the restaurant at the corner of State Route 169 and Southeast 400th Street, she’s collected newspaper articles, photographs and saved the personal letters folks have written about their visit to the historic building and the area of Krain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

krain-coverBy Brenda Sexton

There was a time when the Plateau was covered with bustling, individual communities.

Most had their own school house, community or dance hall and store. They may have had a church, saloon or specialty shop. Most had a band or baseball team. Some had both.

They were filled with farmers, miners and loggers, most arriving from Europe.

Each community had its own heart and soul.

Those areas still serve as reference points for those who live in the Enumclaw area. Ask many today where they live and chances are they will answer with names like Veazie, Osceola, Wabash, Selleck, Birch, Franklin, Flensted, Cumberland, Boise and Krain. (more…)

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