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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 2, 1925

Two recent events are worth calling to the attention of every man in the service. One is the speech of M.B. Morrow, a coal operator of Canmore, Alberta, Canada. The other is the work of the men in the construction of the recreation park at Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 27, 1924

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922Preparations are being rushed for the dawn of July 4th, when Black Diamond will play the host to the other camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company in celebrating the great National Holiday.

Advance information indicates that the camp will be thronged with visitors, and accordingly every effort is being made to provide a day of patriotic exercises and sports which will surpass anything yet staged in Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 1959

Black Diamond, Enumclaw’s next-door neighbor to the north, voted to incorporate as a fourth class town on January 20. At the same election, the voters named seven officials to conduct the town’s business. From left to right are councilwoman Mrs. Gertrude Botts, councilmen Ernest Richardson and Stan W. Hubber, Mayor Lloyd W. Hagen, councilman Gomer Evans Jr., treas. Frank Costi and councilman Louis J. Zumek. The picture was taken at an informal meeting held at the home of Mayor and Mrs. Hagen on Wednesday evening, January 21. —C-H Staff Photo

Black Diamond, Enumclaw’s next-door neighbor to the north, voted to incorporate as a fourth class town on January 20. At the same election, the voters named seven officials to conduct the town’s business. From left to right are councilwoman Mrs. Gertrude Botts, councilmen Ernest Richardson and Stan W. Hubber, Mayor Lloyd W. Hagen, councilman Gomer Evans Jr., treas. Frank Costi and councilman Louis J. Zumek. The picture was taken at an informal meeting held at the home of Mayor and Mrs. Hagen on Wednesday evening, January 21. —C-H Staff Photo

Seven miles northeast of Enumclaw, not far from the north bank of the tortuous Green River, a ghost has yawned and is giving every indication that before long it will throw off its spooky habiliments and take on real flesh and blood.

As the result of a special election on Tuesday, January 20, the Black Diamond settlement, after approximately 75 years’ of existence, became a fourth class incorporated town. At the same election, the voters named a mayor, treasurer, four councilmen and one councilwoman. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2012

By Ken Jensen

JANUARY 5, 1959, 4:15 A.M.

Jack Sperry snapped this photo in 1949 of his son, also Jack, and neighbor Linda Johnson sitting on KCFD 17’s first fire truck near Lake Sawyer.

Jack Sperry snapped this photo in 1949 of his son, also Jack, and neighbor Linda Johnson sitting on KCFD 17’s first fire truck near Lake Sawyer.

“We almost lost the town that day,” recalled Keith Timm, Sr., a former chief of King County Fire Protection District No. 17, based in Black Diamond. Joe Zumek and BDHS Treasurer Don Malgarini, both former volunteer firemen, nodded in agreement at a recent gathering at the Black Diamond Museum.

All three were on the scene of a massive blaze at the Black Diamond Presbyterian Church on Lawson Street that fateful morning—now more than 50 years ago—that also damaged the town’s library and three nearby homes. The site is now home to the Black Diamond Police Department.

“The wind was blowing 40 miles per hour, it was snowing, and burning shingles were blowing all the way down to Morganville,” said Timm. “It was somethin’ else.” The good news was that no one was injured.

“At about 5 o’clock it looked as if the whole town would go up in smoke,” Chief Thomas Zumek told the Enumclaw Herald at the time. “Snow and wind obscured our vision and made fire-fighting extremely difficult.”  (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Fall 2013

By Ken Jensen

The Holy Family Cemetery at Krain, founded in 1889, is located at 25606 SE 400th St., Enumclaw. (Photo: Bob Dobson.)

The Holy Family Cemetery at Krain, founded in 1889, is located at 25606 SE 400th St., Enumclaw. (Photo: Bob Dobson.)

Cemeteries are spooky on Halloween, for sure, but what about the day after? Not so much, especially if you make the trek to the Holy Family Cemetery at Krain, just 8 miles south of Black Diamond, for the Feast of All Saints.

This 120+-year-old tradition was brought to Krain from the “old country” by the Eastern European Catholics who settled the area.

As darkness descends, members of the community and relatives of the departed light candles and recite the rosary, thereby “reaffirming their ties with those who have gone before them in faith,” Pastoral Associate Mathew Weisbeck told the Enumclaw Courier-Herald in 2011.

Hard to believe, but Krain is one of the few places in the world where this centuries-old custom still prevails. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January 1977

From time to time, as material and space permits, we would like to offer you profiles of the pioneers of this area. This first such profile, with pictures, is of Joseph Metzler, age 93 [in 1977], and still quite active.

The following material was graciously prepared by two of Joe’s daughters: Mrs. Clara Hudson of California and Mrs. Marion Langston of Montana. Ann Steiert combined and condensed the material.

Joe, our hats are off to you!

Joseph MetzlerIn the gallery of pioneers one name stands out in prominence for the active part its bearer played in the actual building of Black Diamond. That man is Joseph Metzler.

Joseph Metzler arrived in Black Diamond from Germany on Nov. 4, 1901, at 6 p.m., on a freight train that also pulled a passenger car for passengers. His uncle, Joseph Steiert, paid for his passage and he lived with him for several years.

Several years after he arrived in Black Diamond he sent for his mother, Pauline Metzler, and a step-brother, Emile. He purchased a home for his family across from the ballpark on the new road going to the Morgan Slope (#11) mine. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, November 1990

By Ann Steiert

Evan MorrisDuring the lifetime of most of us we are privileged to become acquainted and work with special people. This has happened to all of us who know and love Evan Morris [1922-2006]. He has been a mover and shaker on almost all projects that have taken place in Black Diamond for many years. The whole historical movement has benefited from his interest and help.

Evan was born into the Jack Morris family on January 27, 1922, at the Enumclaw Hospital. He attended the Selleck grade school and graduated from Enumclaw High School in 1939. He attended Washington State College.

When World War II began, he joined the Navy in 1943 and served as a pilot.

He has a brother, Jack [1918-2007], and two sisters, Pauline Kombol [1927-2011] and Betty Falk [1920-2006]. (more…)

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