Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 3, 1946

Charmed land cities: Black DiamondMINING CENTER – Here is Black Diamond, supported almost exclusively for more than a half century by the extensive coal deposits in its environs. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Spring 2013

By Frank Hammock

Restaurants in historic buildings dish up heaping helpings of hospitality

Koerner’s Drug, 1925, now Black Diamond Pizza & Deli. (Courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis negative number 48373.)

Koerner’s Drug, 1925, now Black Diamond Pizza & Deli. (Courtesy Washington State Historical Society, Asahel Curtis negative number 48373.)

In and around our community, several restaurants that reside in historic buildings have stood the test of time and rouse an interest in our area’s colorful past.

Many businesses have come and gone, but the buildings remain and continue to warm the hearts of those in search of a pinch of nostalgia with a dash of modern charm. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 4, 1963

Cumberland gymnasium

Cumberland school gymnasium, now Station 42 of the Enumclaw Fire Department/KCFD #28.

The mass meeting which was held in the Cumberland schoolhouse last Thursday night, and which was called for the purpose of finding ways and means of giving the town adequate fire protection, was well attended and gave promise of having its objectives attained in the very near future, according to a spokesman for the citizens.

For the past several years Cumberland has been an “orphan” in that during that time the area has been “out of bounds” for the three rural fire districts that encompass it. The three districts are Enumclaw, Black Diamond, and Palmer-Selleck. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Marshall Wilson

Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 19, 1959

Bomb shelter: Mrs. Ronald Frazier, civil-defense worker in Black Diamond, inspected Franklin Mine, which will be King County’s first radiation fall-out shelter. The mine, which will hold 3,000 persons, would also protect against a nuclear blast. Mrs. Frazier suggested use of the mine after finding home-shelter plans were impractical for her family. —Times staff photo by Larry Dion.

Bomb shelter: Mrs. Ronald Frazier, civil-defense worker in Black Diamond, inspected Franklin Mine, which will be King County’s first radiation fall-out shelter. The mine, which will hold 3,000 persons, would also protect against a nuclear blast. Mrs. Frazier suggested use of the mine after finding home-shelter plans were impractical for her family. —Times staff photo by Larry Dion.

A young mother’s concern for her two children, living in a world filled with international crises, was the spark that has led to King County’s first radiation-fall-out shelter near Black Diamond.

Mrs. Ronald Frazier, reception-area manager for the Black Diamond area, recalls that some world crisis was being discussed about a year ago and she wrote to Edward H. Connor, Seattle–King County civil-defense director, for instructions on how to build a home shelter. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, February 8, 1989

Shivering communities band together to battle fire and ice

Dennis Blake at the Cumberland Grocery Store said his community was without power for about 24 hours and water lines were frozen. “We’re having all kinds of fun up here,” Blake laughed. “We stayed good and warm in the store with a fireplace insert.” The store had just received a large shipment of bread and milk, and Blake wasn’t worried about running out of those staples.

Dennis Blake at the Cumberland Grocery Store said his community was without power for about 24 hours and water lines were frozen. “We’re having all kinds of fun up here,” Blake laughed. “We stayed good and warm in the store with a fireplace insert.” The store had just received a large shipment of bread and milk, and Blake wasn’t worried about running out of those staples.

Residents of Cumberland were among the hardest hit by last week’s storm. Fallen trees knocked out power lines and most of the small town was without power and water for more than a day, said assistant fire chief Neil Utterwegner.

Power went out about 6:30 Thursday night and wasn’t restored until midnight Friday, Utterwegner said. With no power, the city’s water tank couldn’t fill and went dry early Friday morning.

Utterwegner said the town, eight miles north of Enumclaw, was more prepared for a storm after learning some things from its experience in 1983.

“I think everything we’ve done reflects back to then.” he said. “We’re kind of getting to where we know what to do.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the News Journal, August 1, 1986

By Barbara Clements, staff reporter

Agneta Slott, 90 (Staff photo by Jim Bates)

Agneta Slott, 90 (Staff photo by Jim Bates)

At 90, Agneta Slott’s hazel eyes are clear and her wit sharp as she recalls her girlhood days in Franklin, once a thriving mining town.

“I went up there many years ago after the town had been closed down,” she said. “It was hard to believe anything has once been there. Now you can only get there by hiking in, and I’m a little too old for that.”

Blackberries and alders now cover the site of the coal-mining community Slott knew as a girl. But memories of the miners and their families who once worked at the town are alive in Slott’s mind. Slott’s father, J.C. Jensen came to Franklin in 1893, after an Enumclaw lumber mill where he worked went belly up.

The Jensen family came to the U.S. from Denmark in 1890 and finally settled in Enumclaw after sojourns in Tacoma and Franklin. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 11, 1973

The Cumberland post office opened October 13, 1894. In this 1941 photo, the post office was located in the Cumberland Store, which is about 7 miles east of Black Diamond and 8 miles north of Enumclaw.

The Cumberland post office opened October 13, 1894. In this 1941 photo, the post office was located in the Cumberland Store, which is about 7 miles east of Black Diamond and 8 miles north of Enumclaw.

The Voice’s correspondent from Cumberland, in the foothills southeast of the Valley, tells us that residents there, mainly the elderly, are uptight these days.

It seems there is no longer a U.S. post office in Cumberland, the mail now being delivered via carrier from Enumclaw.

The highlight in the day for many Cumberland residents, the correspondent relates, was the daily trip to the post office and store.

The Voice staffer receiving the message could only commiserate and promise to pass the news along.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 154 other followers