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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 25, 2014

By Bill Kombol

This bridge is a rare and intact example of the Baltimore-Petit deck truss design, the only such structure owned and maintained by King County. The bridge was designated as a Landmark Bridge in 2004.

This bridge is a rare and intact example of the Baltimore-Petit deck truss design, the only such structure owned and maintained by King County. The bridge was designated as a Landmark Bridge in 2004.

The high bridge spanning the Green River Gorge, a famed and scenic site located between Cumberland and Black Diamond, was built in 1915. The bridge, now a single-lane design, is still in service nearly 100 years later. It was built to connect the Green River Gorge Road west of the river with the Enumclaw-Franklin Road to the east. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 17, 2016

By Bill Kombol

This photo shows the steel truss bridge in the late stages of construction when the roadway/deck was being surfaced.

This photo shows the steel truss bridge in the late stages of construction when the roadway/deck was being surfaced.

The Kummer Bridge was built from June 1932 to October 1933 to provide a more direct route between Black Diamond and Enumclaw. Can you imagine a bridge of this height (155 feet above the Green River); width (28 feet); and span (688 feet) being built in a mere 17 months today?

Originally called the Kummer Cut-off Bridge, it is now officially known as the Dan Evans/Green River Bridge, but often called the SR-169 or High Bridge. Its namesake, Kummer, was a nearby coal and clay mining community. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 10, 2016

By Bill Kombol

The Kummer Bridge spans 688 feet, is 28 feet wide, and stands 155 feet above the river. For that reason, it’s sometimes called the high bridge.

The Kummer Bridge spans 688 feet, is 28 feet wide, and stands 155 feet above the river. For that reason, it’s sometimes called the high bridge.

This view of the Kummer Bridge over the Green River was taken October 1, 1939, by a Seattle Times photographer. The steel truss bridge was constructed in 1932-1933, to provide a more direct route between Black Diamond and Enumclaw. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 11, 1922

By Harry J. Scott

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927The infant 1922 was given an auspicious sendoff in this man’s town. Everything necessary to an enjoyable and successful “Hi Jinks” dance was in evidence when the Clubroom was opened to the guests on Saturday evening.

Bernhard’s orchestra, the same aggregation of artists who furnished the music at our previous dance, was on hand attired in appropriate Hi Jinks costumes, and again delivered the same brand of high grade music for which they are noted. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 28, 1923

Giant booze plant found by raiders

Government agents destroy King County liquor plant with capacity of 150 gallons a day

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

After an ambush of many hours and a spectacular raid in which nearly a score of shots were fired, federal prohibition agents sent up in smoke yesterday, in a secluded valley about three miles from Black Diamond, a distillery, which, they believe, has been one of the largest sources of moonshine in the Northwest.

The distillery, complete from top to bottom, and boasting an oil burner, occupied an entire building—a former combination barn and hop kiln—and had, it is estimated, a capacity to produce from its several vats and its 800-gallon cooker, or still, about 150 gallons a day, which would bring its daily net earnings, considering the bootleggers’ quoted wholesale price, to approximately $900.

Nothing had been overlooked by the moonshiners in their apparent effort to manufacturer a good grade of liquor in great quantities and in varieties in the quickest possible time. There were vats for corn mash, for rye, for prune and for sugar mash, and a piping and valve system which made it possible for one man to operate the plant at top production. The value of the plant was estimated at about $10,000, including contents. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 12, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

Robert Wingate directed a crew led by Frances Bisson that hewed ties for the “incline” from Carbonado down the side of the canyon at the Carbon River (ca. 1883).

Robert Wingate directed a crew led by Frances Bisson that hewed ties for the “incline” from Carbonado down the side of the canyon at the Carbon River (ca. 1883).

On December 9, 1899, 31 men lost their lives in an explosion at the Carbon Hill No. 7 Mine outside the town of Carbonado; they have been memorialized with a monument built at the cemetery and dedicated in 2002.

From 1899 through 1930, more than 100 men were killed in violent explosions and other disasters in the coal mines of Carbonado, Wilkeson, and Burnett.

The memorial was established by the Wilkeson Eagles Aerie No. 1409; the Carbonado Eagles Aerie merged with Wilkeson in 1924. It consists of a large chunk of Wilkeson sandstone weighing more than 2.5 tons with two plaques, one dedicated to those who lost their lives and the other lists the major mine disasters in the Carbon River coal country.

Chunks of coal surround the memorial that is just a few yards away from many of the graves of the miners in the cemetery established in 1880. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 8, 1963

Black Diamond Bakery at sundown.BLACK DIAMOND — Oh, the luscious smell of baking bread! And from the only wood-fired bake oven in the state. George Eipper, 79; Frank Dawson, younger, and Mrs. Margurite LeRoy, with the world of King County beating a path to their door, as the saying is.

King Coal once ruled Black Diamond and the town was known far and wide for a mine more than 1,500 feet below sea level. The king may not be exactly dead, but “black diamonds” no longer are important to the town (pop. 1,035).

In the olden days it was just hurry up the hill to work at one or another of the mines, but now it’s drive, drive, drive. To Boeing, Pacific Car, or the big lumber mill at Enumclaw. Maybe no more than a dozen working miners here now, and they are employed five miles out of town. (more…)

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