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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 20, 1902

He may be in the woods near Sawyer Lake or he may be miles away—No one knows

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

Tracy has apparently dropped as completely out of sight as though the earth had opened and swallowed him. Since his disappearance from the cabin on the shores of Lake Sawyer last Wednesday afternoon, or night, no trace of him has been had.

His long silence and failure to appear at some house for food and clothing lends weight to the opinion of Sheriff Cudihee that Tracy is still in hiding in the vicinity of the lake. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 9, 2014

By Bill Kombol

Lake Sawyer log dump, 1928. Courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, C. Kinsey No. 1684

Lake Sawyer log dump, 1928

This photo by Clark Kinsey shows one of the log dumps of the Lake Sawyer Mill Company, circa 1928. This log dump facility was located on the west shore of Lake Sawyer at the current site of the Sunrise Lake Sawyer Resort. This old log dump is now a short peninsula at the resort which juts out into the lake. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, May 1944

Home from battle: First Lieut. Walter L. Gibson of Black Diamond is home on a brief furlough following his arrival from the European theater of war. He has completed his fifty combat missions.

Home from battle: First Lieut. Walter L. Gibson of Black Diamond is home on a brief furlough following his arrival from the European theater of war. He has completed his fifty combat missions.

Having completed his fifty combat missions overseas, First Lieut. Walter L. Gibson, Army Air Forces, of Black Diamond is home for a short furlough. He arrived home April 25 and will depart May 15 for the Santa Monica, Calif., redistribution center where he will be reassigned to duty.

Lt. Gibson was bombardier on a Liberator bomber. He will put in for pilot’s training at the redistribution center.

His tour of duty overseas took him to Cairo, Palestine, and North Africa. While on leave he visited Nazareth, the Jordan River, and took a row boat ride on the Sea of Galilee.

Overseas 9 months, Lt. Gibson together with the plane and its crew flew to North Africa from the United States via Iceland and England. The plane and its crew operated with its squadron out of North Africa on missions over Greece, Bulgaria, Austria, Hungary, Italy, France and Germany.

On the famous raid on the great German airplane plant at Regensburg Gibson was the lead bombardier upon whose bomb release the rest of the squadron’s planes bombs were dropped. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, May 21, 1953

Jerry Steiert, Black Diamond

Jerry Steiert, Black Diamond

Three weeks of hard but interesting work came to a close last Saturday night at 9 o’clock when the Courier-Herald subscription campaign ended. Three girls and five boys who worked in the campaign received bicycles and the others received cash commissions of 15% of all money they turned in.

The official judges’ count disclosed that five bicycles went to candidates living in the territory outside Enumclaw city, and three went to boys and girls living in Enumclaw city.

Highest of all candidates was Kelly De Marco, who had first choice of prize bicycles and had his favorite bicycle out of the door in less than one minute after he reached the office when he was telephoned at the conclusion of the vote count on Saturday night. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 18, 1953

By Ed Guthman

Stewardess grateful: Mrs. Adra Long, stewardess on the DC-3 transport that crashed Tuesday near Selleck, told three Selleck women who gave her first aid how much she appreciated what they did. Mrs. Long, recovering from leg cuts and bruises in Enumclaw Memorial Hospital, is shown at lower left as she looked when she collapsed in the arms of her rescuer, Lieut. Comdr. Robert T. Norris, Tuesday. The three women from left, Mrs. Bob Sayers, Mrs. Don Lennon, and Mrs. Fred Pettersen visited Mrs. Long to return a red coat Mrs. Long wore when she was rescued. They told Mrs. Long they had been struck by the fact that when she reached Selleck after her harrowing hike from the crash she still was wearing lipstick. Mrs. Long, who had hiked eight miles before being found, told the Selleck women she thought she would fly again.

Stewardess grateful: Mrs. Adra Long, stewardess on the DC-3 transport that crashed Tuesday near Selleck, told three Selleck women who gave her first aid how much she appreciated what they did. Mrs. Long, recovering from leg cuts and bruises in Enumclaw Memorial Hospital, is shown at lower left as she looked when she collapsed in the arms of her rescuer, Lieut. Comdr. Robert T. Norris, Tuesday. The three women from left, Mrs. Bob Sayers, Mrs. Don Lennon, and Mrs. Fred Pettersen visited Mrs. Long to return a red coat Mrs. Long wore when she was rescued. They told Mrs. Long they had been struck by the fact that when she reached Selleck after her harrowing hike from the crash she still was wearing lipstick. Mrs. Long, who had hiked eight miles before being found, told the Selleck women she thought she would fly again.

“The thing that sticks in my mind is that not one of those boys complained—and they had something to complain about.”

“That helicopter pilot was some man. How he flew that thing! I never saw anything like it.”

“For pluck, I’ll take the stewardess. There was a brave girl.”

“I took a look at the first boy they brought in on the helicopter. It was enough. I couldn’t bring myself to look at the others.”

That was the way the conversation went yesterday in Selleck, the peaceful logging community 18 miles southeast of Renton that became a hustling headquarters for the rescue Tuesday of survivors of a DC-3 plane crash on Cedar Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 2, 1913

Lawless malcontents fire into company hotel and attempt to tear down stockade at open camp

Corporation employee gets bullet in foot

Bayne hotel

Bayne hotel

One non-union employee was shot, a rifle bullet shattering his foot, and an attempt was made to tear down the stockade gate and fence at the open-shop Bayne mine of the Carbon Coal & Clay Company, forty miles southeast of Seattle, last night.

It was the climax to a day of demonstration during which more than 1,000 members of the United Mine Workers of America had assembled outside the stockade to register a protest against the non-union status of the employees on the other side of the fence. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 1, 2014

By Bill Kombol

This photo by Vic Condiotty shows the explosion seconds after the detonation which shuttered the mine and destroyed the bridge.

This photo by Vic Condiotty shows the explosion seconds after the detonation which shuttered the mine and destroyed the bridge.

On March 27, 1971, the last coal mine on the Green River Gorge was blasted shut with powerful explosives supplied by a division of Rocket Research based in Redmond.

Coal miners, company officials, explosive experts, and the press gathered on the banks of the Green River as 900 pounds of the experimental dynamite, called Astrolite K, was placed inside the mine portal and on the mine bridge across the river.

Coal was first extracted near the Green River in 1885 at the town of Franklin. Mining boomed until the early 1920s, and continued sporadically through the 1960s. The Franklin No. 10 mine was opened by Palmer Coking Coal Company in 1964 and produced over 66,000 tons of coal during its seven years of operation. (more…)

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