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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 17, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

Durham coal mine, August 1919 (Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries). This photo depicts the mine tipple and coal bunkers at the town of Durham in 1919, shortly before its acquisition by Morris Brother Coal Mining Company Inc. The Durham Colliery Company sold the entire town to Morris Brothers in 1922. This photo was shot from a perch on a coal slag pile that still exists to this day, looking across the Kanaskat-Kangley Road and the railroad tracks visible in the lower foreground. (Photo from Bill Kombol’s collection, Palmer Coking Coal Company.)

Durham coal mine, August 1919 (Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries). This photo depicts the mine tipple and coal bunkers at the town of Durham in 1919, shortly before its acquisition by Morris Brothers Coal Mining Company Inc. The Durham Colliery Company sold the entire town to Morris Brothers in 1922. This photo was shot from a perch on a coal slag pile that still exists to this day, looking across the Kanaskat-Kangley Road and the railroad tracks visible in the lower foreground. (Photo from Bill Kombol’s collection, Palmer Coking Coal Company.)

There is nothing left of the mining town of Durham, once located in southeast King County near the town of Selleck, but it still exists in the minds of Valleyites who grew up there.

The Durham Colliery (English for coal mines and its buildings) was originally organized by Peter Kirk in 1886 to supply coal for the projected Kirkland steel mill. Durham was named for a town in Kirk’s native north England. Production was started in 1888 but coal was only mined until 1889. In 1910, the mines were started again and coal was produced throughout WWI. The mines and associated mining facilities, i.e. hotel, bunkers and company houses, were sold as one unit to the Morris brothers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 17, 1963

Train arriving at the Northern Pacific depot located approximately where the library is today.

Train arriving at the Northern Pacific depot located approximately where the library is today. (Photo from the Facebook page of the Enumclaw Plateau Historical Society Museum.)

An Enumclaw landmark built several years before the turn of the century is scheduled for demolition and replacement. E.W. Tice, Enumclaw agent for the Northern Pacific Railway, told the Courier-Herald this week that the company’s old depot located on east Griffin Avenue will be torn down shortly and replaced by a new 20 x 36 foot building. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 16, 1992

By Barbara Nilson

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

“In order to receive enabling legislation for Cedar County,” said David Fields, spokesman, “we had to name an incorporated city as the county seat so we selected Black Diamond.”

The Black Diamond City Council met Sept. 3 to discuss the proposal and voted unanimously that they would be glad to consider the proposition. “Of course,” said Mayor Howard Botts, “it all hinges on whether Cedar County becomes a reality.”

The official view, according to Mayor Botts, is that the city is neutral on the new county, neither opposing it nor promoting it.

“We’re certainly looking at it with interest,” he said. “It would mean a big change in Black Diamond.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 10, 1986

1986Winners in the various events held during Black Diamond’s Labor Day weekend were, as follows:

QUEEN: Cheryl Peterson
PRINCESS: Marla Aquilar
CITIZEN OF THE YEAR: Tom Dodd

Sunday activities

BASEBALL ROUND-ROBIN: 1. Black Diamond Merchants, 2. Maple Valley Merchants.

WATERMELON EATING CONTEST: 1. Tony Perkins (boys), 2. Tanya Serns (girls).

WOMEN’S NAIL POUNDING: Charlene Birklid.

SOAP BOX DERBY—8-10 year olds: 1. Josh McNeely, 2.·Cliff Rayklovich, 3. Warren Bryant. 11-12 year olds: Dylan Renner, 2. Joe Benneditti, 3. Ryan Lundeen. Men, Best Looking: Joe Benneditti; Most Original: Warren Bryant.

WATERBALL CONTEST—Women: 1. District 46, 2. Black Diamond; Men: 1. Black Diamond, 2. District 44, 3. District 46 (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 14, 1974

votv 8-14-74Maple Valley residents will be offered daily transit service to Seattle when Metro’s September route and service improvements take effect on September 3rd. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 31, 1974

Carl Steiert

Carl Steiert

Carl Steiert, owner of Black Diamond Garage, is retiring at the end of the month after 43 years working at the first and only job he ever held.

Forty-three years ago as a youngster right out of high school, in 1931, he started working for the old Diamond Stage Company which owned the Black Diamond shop and also had one in Maple Valley.

In 1948 the stage lines were sold to Renton Stages. Steiert bought into the company at that time and the name of the Black Diamond location was changed to Diamond Garage. By 1953 Steiert had become sole owner.

“He has enjoyed it all the time,” his wife Ann, who has been bookkeeper and receptionist during the years, explains. “He lives and breathes cars.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 22, 1992

By Barbara Nilson

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Boundary lines for a proposed Cedar County were tentatively set last week, according to Dave Fields, spokesman for a group of six dissenters who are “fed up” with King County’s dominance over unincorporated areas.

The proposed county would stretch from the Snohomish County line and from the North Bend area as far west as the border of King County Fire District 43 and the east edge of Lake Youngs.

It would include the towns of Duvall, Carnation, Black Diamond, and Enumclaw. Also included would be the unincorporated areas of eastern King County, including Maple Valley and Covington without Lake Meridian. (more…)

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