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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 10, 2016

By Bill Kombol

The Kummer Bridge spans 688 feet, is 28 feet wide, and stands 155 feet above the river. For that reason, it’s sometimes called the high bridge.

The Kummer Bridge spans 688 feet, is 28 feet wide, and stands 155 feet above the river. For that reason, it’s sometimes called the high bridge.

This view of the Kummer Bridge over the Green River was taken October 1, 1939, by a Seattle Times photographer. The steel truss bridge was constructed in 1932-1933, to provide a more direct route between Black Diamond and Enumclaw. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 11, 1922

By Harry J. Scott

New Pacific Coast Coal Co logo - 1927The infant 1922 was given an auspicious sendoff in this man’s town. Everything necessary to an enjoyable and successful “Hi Jinks” dance was in evidence when the Clubroom was opened to the guests on Saturday evening.

Bernhard’s orchestra, the same aggregation of artists who furnished the music at our previous dance, was on hand attired in appropriate Hi Jinks costumes, and again delivered the same brand of high grade music for which they are noted. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 28, 1923

Giant booze plant found by raiders

Government agents destroy King County liquor plant with capacity of 150 gallons a day

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

Huge moonshine plant seized by U.S. agents: Building housing the largest distillery plant ever seized in the state was burned by federal officers yesterday on a ranch midway between Auburn and Enumclaw. The distillery was so constructed, with its many vats, pipes, and oil burner, that it couldn’t be dismantled without destroying the building it was in. The upper photograph shows an interior corner and four vats which held various kinds of mash for the 800-gallon cooker or still. The lower one shows the building in flames.

After an ambush of many hours and a spectacular raid in which nearly a score of shots were fired, federal prohibition agents sent up in smoke yesterday, in a secluded valley about three miles from Black Diamond, a distillery, which, they believe, has been one of the largest sources of moonshine in the Northwest.

The distillery, complete from top to bottom, and boasting an oil burner, occupied an entire building—a former combination barn and hop kiln—and had, it is estimated, a capacity to produce from its several vats and its 800-gallon cooker, or still, about 150 gallons a day, which would bring its daily net earnings, considering the bootleggers’ quoted wholesale price, to approximately $900.

Nothing had been overlooked by the moonshiners in their apparent effort to manufacturer a good grade of liquor in great quantities and in varieties in the quickest possible time. There were vats for corn mash, for rye, for prune and for sugar mash, and a piping and valve system which made it possible for one man to operate the plant at top production. The value of the plant was estimated at about $10,000, including contents. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 12, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

Robert Wingate directed a crew led by Frances Bisson that hewed ties for the “incline” from Carbonado down the side of the canyon at the Carbon River (ca. 1883).

Robert Wingate directed a crew led by Frances Bisson that hewed ties for the “incline” from Carbonado down the side of the canyon at the Carbon River (ca. 1883).

On December 9, 1899, 31 men lost their lives in an explosion at the Carbon Hill No. 7 Mine outside the town of Carbonado; they have been memorialized with a monument built at the cemetery and dedicated in 2002.

From 1899 through 1930, more than 100 men were killed in violent explosions and other disasters in the coal mines of Carbonado, Wilkeson, and Burnett.

The memorial was established by the Wilkeson Eagles Aerie No. 1409; the Carbonado Eagles Aerie merged with Wilkeson in 1924. It consists of a large chunk of Wilkeson sandstone weighing more than 2.5 tons with two plaques, one dedicated to those who lost their lives and the other lists the major mine disasters in the Carbon River coal country.

Chunks of coal surround the memorial that is just a few yards away from many of the graves of the miners in the cemetery established in 1880. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 8, 1963

Black Diamond Bakery at sundown.BLACK DIAMOND — Oh, the luscious smell of baking bread! And from the only wood-fired bake oven in the state. George Eipper, 79; Frank Dawson, younger, and Mrs. Margurite LeRoy, with the world of King County beating a path to their door, as the saying is.

King Coal once ruled Black Diamond and the town was known far and wide for a mine more than 1,500 feet below sea level. The king may not be exactly dead, but “black diamonds” no longer are important to the town (pop. 1,035).

In the olden days it was just hurry up the hill to work at one or another of the mines, but now it’s drive, drive, drive. To Boeing, Pacific Car, or the big lumber mill at Enumclaw. Maybe no more than a dozen working miners here now, and they are employed five miles out of town. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, November 29, 1918

honor-wwi

Dr. C.M. Allen
Joe Anicich
David Aphgreene
O.A. Berg
John Baardson
Grant Baker
Ira Baker
James Barnes
Alsin Barnes
James Barry
Tom Barry
Albert Benson
Harry Bengston
Ed Bengston*
Will Bentley
Norman Biles
William Blanchat
Clifford Blanchat
Joseph Blazina
Clarence Blessing
Will Bremer
Otto Brons
Arent Bruhn*
Rolf Bruhn*
Adelore Bureau
Charles Bureau
Wm. M. Burns
Joe Cammerano
Ray Carter
William Chaussee
Bennie Cichy
Pete Christensen
Andrew Christensen
Carrol Christiansen
Laurits Christensen
Bert Colson
Wilbert Conway
James Cushing
Joe Davey
Earl Dawes
Joseph Deluca
Peter Deluca
Fred Dibley
Fred Daggett
Roy Earley
Robert Eckhart
Cecil Englund
Lou Faldborg
Pete Faldborg
M.C. Ferguson
Lafayette Forler
Herbert Forler
Percy Forest
Dan Forest
Forrest M. Franks*
Peter Frisk
Roy Frick
Frank Ghiglone
Anton Gorc
Henry Gray
Howard Green
John Grennon
Walter Gross
Robert Gross
Alvin Hammer
Peter Hansen
Ray Hash
Otis Hash
Wm. Ham
George Haugen
Henry Haugen
W.E. Heidinger
John J. Hogan
John Holden
Ernest Holm
Stanley Hook
Peter Jensen
Oscaar Jensen
Odin Johnson
Alfred Johnson
Arthur Johnson
George Johnson
Floyd Johnson
Stanley Joubert
Ira Jones
Roy Jones
John P. Jones
Roy Kealy
Frank Kealy
George Kress
Leo Kress
William Knight
Lashue Krulikoski
Matt Krulikoski
Bert Krulikoski
Ole Kulberg, Jr.
Stanley Kurfurst
Leo Kurnikoski
George Lafromboise
Sam’l B. Lafromboise
Thorwald Larsen
Ignutz Laush
Ivan Lee
Robert Lee
Vernet Lee
Lando Lesman
Moses Leveck
John Lochridge
John Malneritch
Joe Malneritch
Raymond Manahan
Marion Marlin
George Martinelli
Martin Malneritch
M.P. Malneritch
J.V. Mazurkiewicz
Matt Medie
Angus McKinnon
Ray Milliken
Charles Mitchell
George Mitchell**
Joseph Moeller
Charles Moergell
Marius Mortensen
Frank Muchlinski, Jr.
Joe Muchlinski
Adam Murray
Harry Nelson
Peter G. Nielsen
Arlie Norris
Joe Pierce
Sam Palmquist
Albert Palmquist
Frank Pierce
Adraian Piquette
Ira G. Pearsall
Edmond Perrenoud
Louis Perrenoud
Gus Petereson
John Peterson
Hjalmar L. Peterson
Ray Prentiss
Andrew Rasmussen
Harry Reed
Walter Reed
Otto Reed
Erwin Rengstorff
Charles Rogers
Carl Sandnes
Lester Sims
Fred Shocky
Steven Sharin
Roy Siick
Abraham Smith
Mason D. Smith
Floyd W. Smith
Geroge Spagna
Peter Sorenson
Church Stephenson
Claude Stephenson
Jonah Stevens
Clarence Stout
Henry Sprouse
Walter Stockley
Joe Sturn
Adolph Tamm
Hans Thim
Axel Thim
Gladsone Toman
George Toman
W. W. Toman
Ira Tozer
Michael Twardoski
Leo Twardowski
Dr. F.G. Ulman
Ralph Uphus
Evan Uphus
Frank Van Hoof
Jay Van Patten
Matt Verhonic
Magnus Vestergaard*
John Walczak
Vincent Walczak
Arthur Wallace
Melvin Wilson
John Wizerieski
Frank Wiezerieski

*Died in the War
**Died in the War, Reported in 1919

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 9, 1922

Coming off shift in Newcastle.

Coming off shift in Newcastle.

These men who go down deep “the precious pearls to bring,” were just leaving the works when we flagged them. It was a hard job making them pose for this picture because the hot shower and the “Hot Meat” was waiting for them.

However, in order to oblige us, they stood for the monkey business—and here you are—a portion of the hard-hitting Newcastle crew of miners. (more…)

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