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Posts Tagged ‘Enumclaw’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, November 29, 1918

honor-wwi

Dr. C.M. Allen
Joe Anicich
David Aphgreene
O.A. Berg
John Baardson
Grant Baker
Ira Baker
James Barnes
Alsin Barnes
James Barry
Tom Barry
Albert Benson
Harry Bengston
Ed Bengston*
Will Bentley
Norman Biles
William Blanchat
Clifford Blanchat
Joseph Blazina
Clarence Blessing
Will Bremer
Otto Brons
Arent Bruhn*
Rolf Bruhn*
Adelore Bureau
Charles Bureau
Wm. M. Burns
Joe Cammerano
Ray Carter
William Chaussee
Bennie Cichy
Pete Christensen
Andrew Christensen
Carrol Christiansen
Laurits Christensen
Bert Colson
Wilbert Conway
James Cushing
Joe Davey
Earl Dawes
Joseph Deluca
Peter Deluca
Fred Dibley
Fred Daggett
Roy Earley
Robert Eckhart
Cecil Englund
Lou Faldborg
Pete Faldborg
M.C. Ferguson
Lafayette Forler
Herbert Forler
Percy Forest
Dan Forest
Forrest M. Franks*
Peter Frisk
Roy Frick
Frank Ghiglone
Anton Gorc
Henry Gray
Howard Green
John Grennon
Walter Gross
Robert Gross
Alvin Hammer
Peter Hansen
Ray Hash
Otis Hash
Wm. Ham
George Haugen
Henry Haugen
W.E. Heidinger
John J. Hogan
John Holden
Ernest Holm
Stanley Hook
Peter Jensen
Oscaar Jensen
Odin Johnson
Alfred Johnson
Arthur Johnson
George Johnson
Floyd Johnson
Stanley Joubert
Ira Jones
Roy Jones
John P. Jones
Roy Kealy
Frank Kealy
George Kress
Leo Kress
William Knight
Lashue Krulikoski
Matt Krulikoski
Bert Krulikoski
Ole Kulberg, Jr.
Stanley Kurfurst
Leo Kurnikoski
George Lafromboise
Sam’l B. Lafromboise
Thorwald Larsen
Ignutz Laush
Ivan Lee
Robert Lee
Vernet Lee
Lando Lesman
Moses Leveck
John Lochridge
John Malneritch
Joe Malneritch
Raymond Manahan
Marion Marlin
George Martinelli
Martin Malneritch
M.P. Malneritch
J.V. Mazurkiewicz
Matt Medie
Angus McKinnon
Ray Milliken
Charles Mitchell
George Mitchell**
Joseph Moeller
Charles Moergell
Marius Mortensen
Frank Muchlinski, Jr.
Joe Muchlinski
Adam Murray
Harry Nelson
Peter G. Nielsen
Arlie Norris
Joe Pierce
Sam Palmquist
Albert Palmquist
Frank Pierce
Adraian Piquette
Ira G. Pearsall
Edmond Perrenoud
Louis Perrenoud
Gus Petereson
John Peterson
Hjalmar L. Peterson
Ray Prentiss
Andrew Rasmussen
Harry Reed
Walter Reed
Otto Reed
Erwin Rengstorff
Charles Rogers
Carl Sandnes
Lester Sims
Fred Shocky
Steven Sharin
Roy Siick
Abraham Smith
Mason D. Smith
Floyd W. Smith
Geroge Spagna
Peter Sorenson
Church Stephenson
Claude Stephenson
Jonah Stevens
Clarence Stout
Henry Sprouse
Walter Stockley
Joe Sturn
Adolph Tamm
Hans Thim
Axel Thim
Gladsone Toman
George Toman
W. W. Toman
Ira Tozer
Michael Twardoski
Leo Twardowski
Dr. F.G. Ulman
Ralph Uphus
Evan Uphus
Frank Van Hoof
Jay Van Patten
Matt Verhonic
Magnus Vestergaard*
John Walczak
Vincent Walczak
Arthur Wallace
Melvin Wilson
John Wizerieski
Frank Wiezerieski

*Died in the War
**Died in the War, Reported in 1919

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 9, 1922

Coming off shift in Newcastle.

Coming off shift in Newcastle.

These men who go down deep “the precious pearls to bring,” were just leaving the works when we flagged them. It was a hard job making them pose for this picture because the hot shower and the “Hot Meat” was waiting for them.

However, in order to oblige us, they stood for the monkey business—and here you are—a portion of the hard-hitting Newcastle crew of miners. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

By Brenda Sexton

krain-cemetery-familiesFor more than 120 years, members of the Catholic Church and community have been gathering at the Holy Family Cemetery in Krain at sunset to recite the Rosary and light candles on the graves of the dearly departed for the Feast of All Saints. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

By Brenda Sexton

Nearly every day at the Krain Corner Inn, owner Karen Hatch gets a history lesson.

Through the 22 years she’s owned the restaurant at the corner of State Route 169 and Southeast 400th Street, she’s collected newspaper articles, photographs and saved the personal letters folks have written about their visit to the historic building and the area of Krain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

krain-coverBy Brenda Sexton

There was a time when the Plateau was covered with bustling, individual communities.

Most had their own school house, community or dance hall and store. They may have had a church, saloon or specialty shop. Most had a band or baseball team. Some had both.

They were filled with farmers, miners and loggers, most arriving from Europe.

Each community had its own heart and soul.

Those areas still serve as reference points for those who live in the Enumclaw area. Ask many today where they live and chances are they will answer with names like Veazie, Osceola, Wabash, Selleck, Birch, Franklin, Flensted, Cumberland, Boise and Krain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 24, 2001

By Brenda Sexton

The Krain cemetery has been used by Plateau families for generations, but is filled up. That problem is being solved by using space within the cemetery for additional burial plots. The photo above shows the oldest grave marker in the cemetery, dated 1891.

The Krain cemetery has been used by Plateau families for generations, but is filled up. That problem is being solved by using space within the cemetery for additional burial plots. The photo above shows the oldest grave marker in the cemetery, dated 1891.

When Eileen Francis Verhonick died in August at the age of 80, she was buried with her family at Holy Family Cemetery in the Plateau’s Krain area.

Verhonick and a number of families like hers have held burial plots at the Krain cemetery since the 1800s. Just a few steps away from Verhonick’s final resting place lies the oldest marker, that of Mary Kump (born Jan. 4, 1890, died Jan. 15, 1891).

Verhonick, Kump and others like them are buried at Holy Family Cemetery because their ancestors are there. According to Sacred Heart Catholic Church’s faith formation leader Mathew Weisbeck, when the cemetery was first formed it was designed so family groups would stay together. Today, there are about 42 family areas there, each with about eight burial spots.

Getting an accurate count on how many people are buried there now is difficult, but Weisbeck said approximately 267, and, for all practical purposes, the cemetery is full.

Until now. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 24, 1957

Parents representing 16 of the 21 elementary pupils enrolled at the Cumberland School District No. 66 last week petitioned the Enumclaw Board of Education for permission to send their children to the local schools, charging the Cumberland school board with failure to provide sufficient teachers and school facilities.

cumberland-mothers

The upper photo shows 19 or 21 pupils enrolled. Lower photo shows seven mothers of Cumberland children who spearheaded the drive to get their children in local schools. From left to right are: Mrs. Joe Nazum, Mrs. Marvin Tracy, Mrs. Jess Gates, Mrs. Leonard Orne, Mrs. Don Winsor, Mrs. Maurice Stanley, and Mrs. Emmett Gleason.

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