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Posts Tagged ‘Eureka’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, December 7, 2010

By Bill Kombol

The Miller boarding house was located about 500 feet east of Miller’s saloon, known as Ben’s Place.

The Miller boarding house was located about 500 feet east of Miller’s saloon, known as Ben’s Place.

This photo shows the 17-room boarding house belonging to Ben and LuLu (McCracken) Miller, which operated near a coal-mining town called Naco, the home of the Navy mine operations on the Naval coal seams.

Originally known as Sunset, the name was changed to Navy in 1908, and in 1916 the Northern Pacific railroad coined the term Naco for the railway stop. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 17, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

Durham coal mine, August 1919 (Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries). This photo depicts the mine tipple and coal bunkers at the town of Durham in 1919, shortly before its acquisition by Morris Brother Coal Mining Company Inc. The Durham Colliery Company sold the entire town to Morris Brothers in 1922. This photo was shot from a perch on a coal slag pile that still exists to this day, looking across the Kanaskat-Kangley Road and the railroad tracks visible in the lower foreground. (Photo from Bill Kombol’s collection, Palmer Coking Coal Company.)

Durham coal mine, August 1919 (Special Collections, University of Washington Libraries). This photo depicts the mine tipple and coal bunkers at the town of Durham in 1919, shortly before its acquisition by Morris Brothers Coal Mining Company Inc. The Durham Colliery Company sold the entire town to Morris Brothers in 1922. This photo was shot from a perch on a coal slag pile that still exists to this day, looking across the Kanaskat-Kangley Road and the railroad tracks visible in the lower foreground. (Photo from Bill Kombol’s collection, Palmer Coking Coal Company.)

There is nothing left of the mining town of Durham, once located in southeast King County near the town of Selleck, but it still exists in the minds of Valleyites who grew up there.

The Durham Colliery (English for coal mines and its buildings) was originally organized by Peter Kirk in 1886 to supply coal for the projected Kirkland steel mill. Durham was named for a town in Kirk’s native north England. Production was started in 1888 but coal was only mined until 1889. In 1910, the mines were started again and coal was produced throughout WWI. The mines and associated mining facilities, i.e. hotel, bunkers and company houses, were sold as one unit to the Morris brothers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Black Diamond Bulletin, Fall 2011

By Ken Jensen

You know you’ve reached Cumberland when you see this sign on the Veazie-Cumberland Road.

You know you’ve reached Cumberland when you see this sign on the Veazie-Cumberland Road.

Take a drive from Black Diamond, up Lawson Hill and past Lake 12, past Franklin and over the one-lane bridge, past the Green River Gorge Resort and up toward the foothills to the southeast….

At last you arrive at the corner of SE 352nd Street and the Veazie-Cumberland Road. An old rusted Pepsi sign marks the spot that—if it were in better condition—would sure to be coveted by those guys from American Pickers.

Welcome to Cumberland. (more…)

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