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Posts Tagged ‘Fall City’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 15, 1911

Quarterly apportionment made to various districts of King County

M.E. Durham, deputy county superintendent, yesterday completed the last quarterly apportionment to the various school districts of the county. The total amount distributed was $580,572.55, of which $314,662.19 was from the state fund and $265,909.86 from the county fund. The apportionment was 7.6 cents per day’s attendance and $75 per teacher employed.

Those districts receiving more than $1,200 were: Seattle, $46,394; Renton, $9,160; Kent, $8,327; Auburn, $7,935; Foster, $4,740; Enumclaw, $4,175; Black Diamond, $4,035; Bothell, $3,918; Oak Lake, $3,805; Issaquah, $3,124; Ravensdale, $2,084; Richmond, $1,989; Kennydale, $1,833; Bellevue, $1,779; Kirkland, $1,700; Newcastle, $1,676; Redmond, $1,601; North Bend, $1,518; Des Moines, $1,520; Fall City, $1,337; Pacific, $1,218.

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 16, 1900

King County road supervisors held a well-attended and spirited convention in the library room at the court house yesterday afternoon. A permanent organization to be known as the Road Supervisors’ Association of King County was formed, and numerous speeches dealing with road matters were made. The principal suggestions referred to what is known as the trunk system of roads and broad wagon tires.

Superintendent of Streets Little, of the Seattle city government, called the convention to order, and gave way to temporary chairman W.J. Trimble, of Redmond. After W.E. Conway, A.J. Bossert, and C.H. Daniels, committee on rules and business, and James Clark, George Hummell, and David Gibbon, committee on permanent organization, had reported, the election of officers took place. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 26, 1979

Roy Freeman, architect of the proposed new county (shown above) still insists that, indeed, its time is here. Speaking at last week’s meeting of the Maple Valley Chamber of Commerce, Freeman says he has traveled 40,000 miles promoting the plan since 1972. The Create Cascade County group still has some left-over bumper stickers and $63 in the bank.

Cascade County, once formed, could make a go of it, Freeman said. The tax base in the proposed area has increased from $295 million in the early 1970s to more than $500 million. In 1974 he estimated $2.5 million was needed to run the new county, with tax revenue totaling $3.1 million.

“At present,” he argued, “we’re being run from Seattle.”

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1983

By Herb Balanger
Times South bureau

The Lester train depot was 52 years old when this picture was taken in 1940 for the King County tax assessor’s office. It is one of thousands being processed and filed by the Regional State Archives center In Burien. Numbers at the left identify when the picture was taken (June 19, 1940) and the assessor’s file number; numbers at the bottom indicate section, township and page in the assessor’s log book and tax lot number; Depot #9 indicates it is the building number In the group belonging to the railroad.

The Lester train depot was 52 years old when this picture was taken in 1940 for the King County tax assessor’s office. It is one of thousands being processed and filed by the Regional State Archives center in Burien. Numbers at the left identify when the picture was taken (June 19, 1940) and the assessor’s file number; numbers at the bottom indicate section, township and page in the assessor’s log book and tax lot number; Depot #9 indicates it is the building number in the group belonging to the railroad.

A group of volunteers from the Association of King County Historical Organizations has been hard at work since March trying to preserve what Mike Saunders, archivist, considers “the most comprehensive countywide local history photo collection in the state.”

The work, being done at the Regional State Archives in the former Sunset Junior High School in Highline, will probably be completed in September. Saunders said.

The job involves going through 70,000 to 90,000 negatives from the county assessor’s files dating from a Works Progress Administration project of 1936–1940, in which all the real property in the county was inventoried. Additional photos were taken through 1973 updating the changes to the buildings. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, April 29, 1970

By Gene Woodwick

Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway’s Engine No. 2, the D.H. Gilman, photographed on Independence Day, 1895.

Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway’s Engine No. 2, the D.H. Gilman, photographed on Independence Day, 1895.

The recent merger of the railroads will soon affect the rail system through the Issaquah and Snoqualmie Valleys.

Eighty-one years ago the big news in both valleys was that the railroads were coming through. Now there would be a way to ship the hops, dairy, and forest products to markets and the area could really be opened for settlement.

In 1885 the Seattle, Lake Shore and Eastern Railroad company was formed by some citizens in Seattle, headed by Daniel Heine Gilman. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, March 14, 1990

Take a look at the elder Paul Kos’ huge, work-worn hands holding baby Paul and you could probably guess that the Kos family is a part of Issaquah’s coal mining history. This photo taken in 1908, shows Mr. Kos in his prime surrounded by his family (daughter Rose Kos Croston, wife Rose Kos, and sons Frank and Paul Kos). Photo courtesy of Paul Kos.

Take a look at the elder Paul Kos’ huge, work-worn hands holding baby Paul and you could probably guess that the Kos family is a part of Issaquah’s coal mining history. This photo taken in 1908, shows Mr. Kos in his prime surrounded by his family (daughter Rose Kos Croston, wife Rose Kos, and sons Frank and Paul Kos). Photo courtesy of Paul Kos.

Around the turn of the century, Paul Kos left his wife and family behind in Yugoslavia (then Austria-Hungary) to find a better life in America. He came to the coal mines in Ravensdale, south of Issaquah.

The first words Kos learned in English were “hurry up!” Working 10 hour-days for $2.50 a day it took him five years to save up enough to bring Rose and the two oldest children over.

In 1912, the family moved to Issaquah to take advantage of the town’s coal boom. Single miners lived in rooming houses or in the tent city along the creek, but the Kos family bought the “horseshoe” house at First Avenue NE and Bush Street. (more…)

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Originally published in the Issaquah Press, October 18, 1962

high-trestle-near-issaquahIt is often surprising to stand in a familiar spot, looking around as you have many times before, and see things you never knew were there.

This happened to me one evening recently outside the east door of the high school, a place where I’ve stood many times before. There was still some daylight, everyone else was still inside the building, and I had a good chance to observe the whole southeast part of town from the top of “school house hill.” Many interesting things appear from up there which are typically part of Issaquah, and make up its character.

There is the yellow, wooden spire of St. Joseph’s Church, for instance, just visible above the trees. It was built there in 1896 on land donated by Peter McCloskey, and has been in constant use by the town’s Catholic congregation ever since. There were no trees around it then, because all the big timber had been cut off to make room for the vigorous new town and there hadn’t been time to grow new ones.

However, the forest was still thick a few blocks to the east and around the railroad trestle on the N.P. branch line to Snoqualmie. There wasn’t even a road out there in 1900, for the route to the easterly neighbor towns of Fall City and Snoqualmie was by way of Vaughn’s Hill. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 16, 1992

By Barbara Nilson

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

“In order to receive enabling legislation for Cedar County,” said David Fields, spokesman, “we had to name an incorporated city as the county seat so we selected Black Diamond.”

The Black Diamond City Council met Sept. 3 to discuss the proposal and voted unanimously that they would be glad to consider the proposition. “Of course,” said Mayor Howard Botts, “it all hinges on whether Cedar County becomes a reality.”

The official view, according to Mayor Botts, is that the city is neutral on the new county, neither opposing it nor promoting it.

“We’re certainly looking at it with interest,” he said. “It would mean a big change in Black Diamond.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 22, 1992

By Barbara Nilson

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Boundary lines for a proposed Cedar County were tentatively set last week, according to Dave Fields, spokesman for a group of six dissenters who are “fed up” with King County’s dominance over unincorporated areas.

The proposed county would stretch from the Snohomish County line and from the North Bend area as far west as the border of King County Fire District 43 and the east edge of Lake Youngs.

It would include the towns of Duvall, Carnation, Black Diamond, and Enumclaw. Also included would be the unincorporated areas of eastern King County, including Maple Valley and Covington without Lake Meridian. (more…)

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