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Posts Tagged ‘fires’

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, June 9, 1992

By Mike Archbold

For Diane Boxx, the toughest call was the dead baby.

“It was the first time I ever cried on a call,” she told me. Even now, years later, the telling of it is painful. Her voice broke ever so slightly. There was a tightening around her eyes.

The child was a victim of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. “We worked on the baby. We had called the medics,” she said. “The hardest part was knowing we couldn’t bring the baby back.”

One of her best calls was another infant. The 45-year-old mother of two helped deliver the baby who had decided to enter the world a bit early. “We were all on Cloud 9 after that,” she said with a smile. In fact, she and her fellow volunteer firefighters have delivered three babies, she said proudly.

For those who deal with death all the time, dealing with life is an honor, incidents to be celebrated and savored. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1922

Green River mill at Baldi completely destroyed

Pacific States Company loses three outfits, thousands in railway equipment

Forest fire damage to the Pacific States Lumber Company, both at Selleck and Cedar Falls, was increased overnight with the loss last night of Camp No. 18 at Cedar Falls. This makes three logging camps lost by the company, including all the bridges on eleven miles of railway, a coal bunker, twelve donkey engines, fifteen freight cars, a section camp, an enormous amount of fallen timber, and several cars of logs. Two small residences at Selleck also burned last night. Today there was virtually no wind around the company’s territory and it was reported the fire situation was getting under control. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 29, 1926

Expressing their genuine pleasure at the recent return home of N.D. Moore, vice-president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the Black Diamond Band last Saturday evening serenaded Mr. and Mrs. Moore at their home, 618 Fullerton Street, Seattle. The affair was a complete surprise to Mr. Moore, who knew nothing whatever about it until the music started. After a short concert on the lawn the boys were invited in and served with refreshments. Accompanying the band were Supt. Paul Gallagher, A.W. Gray, and Geo. Upton.

Those in the band included Bandmaster Frank Carroll, Earl Manchester, Ray Rosso, Wm. Tretheway, H. Parkinson, VanManchester, Ed Lockridge, Thos. Hughes, G. Lile, F. Heister, Jim Boyd, H. Saarella, B.M. McVicar, Ed. Crossman, Al Winckworth, Fred Carroll, B. McDonald, Theo. Rouse, and Tony Schultz. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 22, 1926

In a previous issue of the Bulletin there appeared a picture of Black Diamond’s first division soccer team. In recognition of the fine showing made during the last season by the camp’s second division team, known as the Black Diamond Briquets, we herewith present the picture of the booters whose record speaks for itself.

From left to right, front, Chas. Thompson, Art Fowler, Vic White, John Thompson, H. “Shorty” Ogden; second row, Joe Fowler, Vic Roberts, Chas. L. Gallagher; back row, H.J. Wingfield, linesman, Chas. Maroni, H.L. Berry, “Boots” Pierotti, and F.A. Strange. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 10, 2015

By Kathleen Kear

Black Diamond resident Joe Androsko (right) took former Fire Chief Keith Timm (left) for a joy ride down memory lane in the Black Diamond Fire Department’s first fire engine—a 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper (rededicated in July 2014 during Miners Day)—to Black Diamond’s fire station. Photo by Kevin Esping.

What could be more fun than warm sunny weather in January? How about a ride in one of Black Diamond’s first fire engines, a 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper, with former Black Diamond Fire Chief Keith B. Timm?

Several weeks ago, Joe Androsko, Black Diamond resident and project manager of the 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper fire engine restoration project, went to pick up former Black Diamond Fire Chief Keith Timm and thereafter went for a joy ride down memory lane in the engine. Although Timm served as a Black Diamond firefighter from 1948-1976 before the engine came to town, he remembered fires being fought with a hose cart that had to be pulled around from one fire to another. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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5-year project to put life back into Franklin

Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 11, 1994

By Keith Ervin
Seattle Times South bureau

Lindsay Larson leads a group of students through the old cemetery they are cleaning up. Many of the deaths were caused by mining accidents. (Jimi Lott, Seattle Times)

HISTORIC FRANKLIN—Hidden beneath the maples and cottonwoods of the Green River Gorge are secrets unseen by the casual visitor.

Some of those secrets are a little more visible today than they were yesterday, thanks to eighth-graders from Cedar Heights Junior High School in Covington. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 28, 1926

New Black Diamond Mine was visited by the representatives of the Sales Department as a part of the two-day program last week. In the mine the salesmen saw visual evidence of the company’s confidence in the future of the coal industry. The picture of the group was taken at the face of the gangway after they had walked in from the main entrance. (more…)

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Originally published in The Issaquah Press, January 28, 2009

This was likely taken in the 1910s. It came from a book of photos of all of Pacific Coast Co. properties, including this mine property held by its subsidiary, Pacific Coast Coal Co. (Issaquah History Museums)

Coal mining led to Issaquah’s transformation from farming community to bustling town.

The industry brought hundreds of workers to Issaquah; the growth continued as businessmen established banks, shops, and other services. Issaquah miners were all ages and came from all across the world, drawn to the area by the promise of employment—at wages higher than that of East Coast miners.

In 1900, just over 60 percent of Issaquah’s workforce was employed in coal mines. About half of these men lived with their families, often in housing rented to them by the mining company. Others were single or separated from their family and lived as boarders in one of Issaquah’s many hotels. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 14, 1926

This Link-Belt moveable crane is used at the Briquet Plant not only to load Diamond Briquets from the storage platform into the cars, but also to load coal from the storage piles into cars preparatory to sending it through the plant. (more…)

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