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Posts Tagged ‘fires’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 10, 2015

By Kathleen Kear

Black Diamond resident Joe Androsko (right) took former Fire Chief Keith Timm (left) for a joy ride down memory lane in the Black Diamond Fire Department’s first fire engine—a 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper (rededicated in July 2014 during Miners Day)—to Black Diamond’s fire station. Photo by Kevin Esping.

What could be more fun than warm sunny weather in January? How about a ride in one of Black Diamond’s first fire engines, a 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper, with former Black Diamond Fire Chief Keith B. Timm?

Several weeks ago, Joe Androsko, Black Diamond resident and project manager of the 1947 Ford Howard-Cooper fire engine restoration project, went to pick up former Black Diamond Fire Chief Keith Timm and thereafter went for a joy ride down memory lane in the engine. Although Timm served as a Black Diamond firefighter from 1948-1976 before the engine came to town, he remembered fires being fought with a hose cart that had to be pulled around from one fire to another. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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5-year project to put life back into Franklin

Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 11, 1994

By Keith Ervin
Seattle Times South bureau

Lindsay Larson leads a group of students through the old cemetery they are cleaning up. Many of the deaths were caused by mining accidents. (Jimi Lott, Seattle Times)

HISTORIC FRANKLIN—Hidden beneath the maples and cottonwoods of the Green River Gorge are secrets unseen by the casual visitor.

Some of those secrets are a little more visible today than they were yesterday, thanks to eighth-graders from Cedar Heights Junior High School in Covington. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 28, 1926

New Black Diamond Mine was visited by the representatives of the Sales Department as a part of the two-day program last week. In the mine the salesmen saw visual evidence of the company’s confidence in the future of the coal industry. The picture of the group was taken at the face of the gangway after they had walked in from the main entrance. (more…)

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Originally published in The Issaquah Press, January 28, 2009

This was likely taken in the 1910s. It came from a book of photos of all of Pacific Coast Co. properties, including this mine property held by its subsidiary, Pacific Coast Coal Co. (Issaquah History Museums)

Coal mining led to Issaquah’s transformation from farming community to bustling town.

The industry brought hundreds of workers to Issaquah; the growth continued as businessmen established banks, shops, and other services. Issaquah miners were all ages and came from all across the world, drawn to the area by the promise of employment—at wages higher than that of East Coast miners.

In 1900, just over 60 percent of Issaquah’s workforce was employed in coal mines. About half of these men lived with their families, often in housing rented to them by the mining company. Others were single or separated from their family and lived as boarders in one of Issaquah’s many hotels. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 14, 1926

This Link-Belt moveable crane is used at the Briquet Plant not only to load Diamond Briquets from the storage platform into the cars, but also to load coal from the storage piles into cars preparatory to sending it through the plant. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 9, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The remodeled company store for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. built around 1890 in Burnett now houses the "Pinch Plum" gift shop.

The remodeled company store for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. built around 1890 in Burnett now houses the “Pinch Plum” gift shop. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

In 1891 the former mining town of Burnett, located about two and a half miles from Wilkeson and 6 miles from Enumclaw, estimated its population at 400 people. Today possibly less than 100 people live in the 32 homes with water hookups. Some of the homes are still the miner’s cottages from the turn of the century when it was an important coal-mining center.

It was situated on the Burnett branch of the Northern Pacific railroad and was sustained by the mines of Pacific Coast Coal Co. that employed around 300 men. There were several business places in upper Burnett, including the company store, which has been remodeled into The Pinch Plum gift shop by Jay and Dailene Argo. Argo, who bought the building in 1977, said he tried to keep the building as authentic as possible. (more…)

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