Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘fires’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 9, 1925

Probably the youngest First Aid Team in the world, the Black Diamond Midgets, ranging in age from 7 to 9 years, were a feature attraction at the Independence Day celebration in Black Diamond. The boys are training for an exhibition drill at the State Meet to be held July 25. Johnny Gallagher is captain of the team, the other members including Roy Hale, Jimmy Nicholson, Oliver Rouse, Harold Lloyd, Bennie Hughes, and Elmon Rouse. Harold Lloyd, Sr., is the instructor. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 2000

By Barbara Nilson

Photos by Sherrie Acker

The “action” in the 1920s to 1950s, from Seattle south, was at the lake resorts in the Valley. Memories of those glory days were shared at the March program with Dolores Gaffney and Janet Bertagni talking about Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness resort, and Gloria Foss remembering the family’s resort on Shadow Lake.

Lake Wilderness resorts

Attending the historical society program on resorts were, from left, Janet Bertagni, Dolores Gaffney Judge, and Bernadine Gaffney Gebenini.

Dolores Gaffney, daughter of Tom Gaffney, reported her father and his brother Kain purchased the property on Lake Wilderness in 1926 from Abraham and Sam Cohen. The family moved to the lake and the resort opened in the spring of 1927 as Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness.

At that time there were three small family resorts on the lake. Dieckman with his two sons, Jeff and Don, had just started one, and across the lake was McKinney’s. McKinney’s also had a dance hall that was two stories high that they eventually turned into a skating rink. In April 1939 McKinneys sold their place to Gaffneys.

One of the older buildings was used for a dance hall, said Dolores, and they used kerosene lamps. In 1936 they built a new dance hall after the old one burned down. They had a 30-foot-high diving board as well as cabins, tennis courts, picnic areas, ball fields, and playgrounds.

In 1949 Diekmans and Gaffneys were combined and the Gaffneys decided to build a lodge. The design was developed by Young, Richardson and Carlson and won the grand prize from the Washington Chapter of Architects in 1951 and the top award from the American Institute in New York in 1952. The center column totem pole was carved by the famous Doug McCarter. It is 35 feet tall and weighs ten tons. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 30, 1925

Josephine Corliss Preston

Josephine Corliss Preston

Following a three-day convention of the County School Superintendents of the state at Olympia, at which were present a number of prominent national and state educational leaders, the delegates have been invited to visit Carbonado Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mrs. Josephine Corliss Preston, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Mrs. Clare Ketchum Tripp, Director of the Washington Industries Educational Bureau, have arranged for those attending the convention to visit a number of industrial plants in Tacoma on Thursday morning, April 30.

Immediately following lunch, the party will be conducted by auto to Carbonado, via South Prairie and Wilkeson. Details of the program will be found on the last page of the Bulletin. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, April 12, 1914

Rebuilt sawmill costs $200,00

New plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., will begin operations June 1

Rebuilt plant of Pacific States Lumber Company at Selleck, Wash., to be opened June 1.

On the site of its old plant at Selleck, Wash., which was destroyed by fire last January 3, the Pacific States Lumber Company has just completed the building of a new sawmill at a cost of about $200,000. Work now is in progress installing the machinery, and it is expected to have the mill in operation June 1, with the capacity force of 350 men. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the King County Journal Reporter, February 1, 2006

Official says toxic gases and high temperatures are dangerous to recreationists

By Morris Malakoff
Journal Reporter

The main opening of one of the coal mines on Cougar Mountain is fenced off. Some of the abandoned mines are burning and collapsing, creating potential dangers for park visitors who hike off of the main trails.

The main opening of one of the coal mines on Cougar Mountain is fenced off. Some of the abandoned mines are burning and collapsing, creating potential dangers for park visitors who hike off of the main trails.

The Industrial Revolution is colliding with the Information Age in the forests south of Bellevue.

Underground coal mines that operated for a century, from the 1860s through the 1950s, are now abandoned—burning and collapsing—and creating potential hazards for park patrons who venture off the established trails in the four-square-mile Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park.

“It’s more than just taking a bad fall,” said Ginger Kaldenbach, senior project manager for U.S. Office of Surface Mining, the agency is responsible for monitoring and sealing abandoned mines. “Many of these mines emit toxic gases and if someone fell into one that is burning, the temperatures are hot and they would be severely burned.”

Of particular concern to Kaldenbach are outdoor recreationists engaged in geocaching—a high-tech treasure hunt using a handheld GPS monitor that tracks a location using a satellite network.

“They are looking at their GPS devices and may not see a collapsed mine and fall into it,” Kaldenbach said. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »