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Posts Tagged ‘fires’

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, December 14, 1888

No change for better or worse reported—the miners working upon brattice work

No change for better or worse was reported from the Franklin coal mine fire yesterday. Mr. Milner went out there again, going through the mine with Superintendent Watkins. He authorizes the denial of the rumor of Mr. Watkins’ resignation.

The fire is in the lower McKay tunnel, and has been located in a worked out “breast.” Mr. Milner said they were attempting to smother it out, with every prospect of success. The air is to be shut out by brattice work, which the miners began to put up Wednesday night, and which it was expected to be completed by this morning.

The effort to extinguish the fire by flooding the mine has been abandoned. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 13, 1910

Explosion of fire damp results when fire eats through from old workings in N.W. Imp. Co.’s property

Five men injured and two entombed

An explosion in the Northwestern Improvement Company’s mine at Ravensdale at 11 o’clock this morning fatally injured three miners, seriously injured two others, and imprisoned two more.

A 2 o’clock this afternoon the mine was on fire and the fate of the two imprisoned men is in doubt. Rescuers are at work, but unless the prisoners are liberated within the next two hours they will be consumed by the flames. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 12, 1895

Since the bodies of the four miners, who lost their lives in the mine fire at Franklin October 17 last, have been recovered, the strain on the nerves of the workmen of the mine has been relieved and the miners have now but one object in view—the reopening of the mine.

It is believed that coal will be coming up the main slope by January 10. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 11, 1895

Entombed three months: The four men who went down in the coal mine during a slope fire—work of rescue has been progressing for about a month

B.F. Bush, general superintendent of the Oregon Improvement Company, received word today from Franklin that the bodies of the four miners who lost their lives in the mine fire of October 17 last had been recovered. The bodies were almost incinerated, but were identified by articles and particles of clothing found on the bodies. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS newsletter, The Bugle, October 1991

(Some of the old-timers of Maple Valley have been asked to write down recollections of earlier days. Most of what I recall is family history and there are times I cannot trust my memory. Also, much of it reflects a child’s point of view. Even my sister Ruth and I have entirely different recollections.)Inez (Williams) Merritt

1927 Tahoma High School. Inez Williams is in the second row, fourteenth from the left. (Courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society.)

1927 Tahoma High School. Inez Williams is in the second row, fourteenth from the left. (Courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society.)

My father, Roger Williams, became disabled in the summer of 1925 with what was diagnosed as inflammatory rheumatism. He was staying with relatives in Renton and mother had to cope with running the farm and an infant daughter born April 8th (Ruth).

Jean was 15 years old and I was 10 years old. We were able to do the everyday chores but the haying was beyond our capabilities.

One warm day in July, a parade of teams (horses) and wagons of all sizes and description came through the front gate and up to the barn.

These were neighbors who cheerfully gave up a day’s work on their own farms to give us a hand. There was even a team of mules among the others. It is the hardest job anyone would want to do and the hot, dry days of summer make it even worse. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 23, 1895

The Oregon Improvement Company’s coal mine at Franklin has been closed down and sealed in order to smother the fire which occurred in the main slope last week and in which four men lost their lives. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 18, 1895

The slope is stopped up

Franklin mines continue to be the scene of excitement—every effort was made to rescue the four unfortunate men without avail

The bodies of the four men known to have perished in the slope fire yesterday at the Franklin coal mines have not been recovered and the fire has not yet been extinguished, although the flames have been got under control and the slope closed up with timbers, sand, and dirt.

Of the men dead, full mention of whom was made in the 5 o’clock edition of last evening’s Times, John Glover was a white man and George W. Smalley, John Adams, and James Stafford were colored men, Smalley leaving a wife and child and Adams and Stafford being single men. (more…)

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