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Posts Tagged ‘fires’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 5, 1978

Only rubble was left in the aftermath of a spectacular fire which destroyed the Four Corners Trading Post last Wednesday. – Courtesy Pony Photo

Only rubble was left in the aftermath of a spectacular fire which destroyed the Four Corners Trading Post last Wednesday. – Courtesy Pony Photo

A well-known landmark on the Kent-Kangley Road near Highway 169 was lost last Wednesday afternoon when the Four Corners Trading Post was destroyed in a spectacular fire.

The owner, Jim Junivicz, was working in a nearby shed when he noticed fire in the back of the main building and called the fire department. When firemen arrived on the scene, the building was fully involved, with flames and smoke shooting more than fifty feet into the air. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 30, 1940

The stubborn fire near Hobart, twenty-five miles east of Seattle, which is believed to have been set by a firebug early last week, burned on unabated last night over an area of almost 1,800 acres of cutover land while weary crews battled to keep it within present confines.

Immediately threatened are the huge stands of virgin timber near and on Seattle’s Cedar River watershed. The flames licked their way into this first-growth timber in several spots late yesterday and only by hard work were the crews able to check their spread. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 1995

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

My name is Vivian Mathison. I was Vivian Kelley when I lived in Hobart from 1930 to 1939. My family moved to Hobart from Kerriston on March 17, 1930.

Our family consisted of our parents, Will and Maude Kelley, Lois, Vera, Grace, and me. Also Mike, our black and white Spitz dog given to us by the Higgins family when they moved away.

I was 10 years old when we moved to Hobart and I entered Miss Bock’s 4th grade. My special friend right away was Vivian Peterson. We were the two Vivs, and remained best friends all through school, attending Tahoma and graduating in 1938.

From my point of remembrance our family’s special friends were the W.D. Thompsons, the Lonnie Triggs, Norma Purdy, Vivian Peterson, Dave Conard, and Gerald Bartholomew. My sister Lois and Gerald, and Dave and I enjoyed going to the dances at Lake Wilderness. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 26, 1913

franklin-fire-1913FRANKLIN, Thursday, June 26 — The hotel building belonging to the local coal mining company and twenty-one frame dwelling houses were destroyed by a fire that started here at 2:30 o’clock this morning. The loss to the hotel and contents is about $16,000. The extent of the loss to the other buildings has not been determined.

The origin of the fire has not been learned but it is thought to have started on the second floor of the hotel. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, June 13, 1913

These buildings were located where the Green River Eagles #1490 is today.

Fire broke out in the Black Diamond Hotel last Friday morning at about 2 o’clock, said to be caused by a man’s carelessness in smoking in one of the rooms. The building and contents were entirely destroyed, and the flames spread to Pete Fredericksen’s meat market adjoining, and a nearby residence, both being consumed.

A small safe containing considerable money, a cash register, and some books were saved from the market. Some meat was also carried out, but much of it was stolen after being placed beyond the reach of the flames. The insurance on all the property was small and the loss consequently was considerable.

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King County mining town suffers loss of fifty thousand dollars and many persons are rendered homeless

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1907

The first destructive fire to visit Black Diamond occurred today, when the town was swept by flames, entailing a loss of $50,000 and rendering many persons homeless.

The fire started in the residence of J.T. Williams and is supposed to have been caused by a defective flue. The flames spread with alarming rapidity, soon reaching the business section of the town, licking up private residences in its path.

Scarcity of water placed the men who attempted to check the progress of the flames at a disadvantage. As soon as the alarm was sounded and it was seen that the flames were in danger of spreading, the mines were closed down and the men came from the pit and worked in an effort to save their own property or that of others. The fire started at 10 o’clock and was not under control until noon. (more…)

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