Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Flaming Geyser Park’

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 11, 2016

By Bill Kombol

With the Major League Baseball [season] ready to begin, it’s fun to look back over 100 years to a women’s baseball team which played for Ravensdale.

Though baseball and soccer were big sports for coal miners representing their respective mining towns, the ladies also took up bat and glove. According to Barbara Nilson’s Ravensdale Reflections, baseball games were played every Sunday at a rough field on the Landsburg Road just across from the Markus store, now known as the Ravensdale Market. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 28, 2015

By Bill Kombol

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

Photo # PI-24764 comes courtesy of Museum of History & Industry and shows a 1925 Chrysler Phaeton Six at the park’s entrance.

In September 1925 the Seattle Post-Intelligencer published an article about Flaming Geyser Park and its unique gas-bubbling spring. At that time it was a privately-owned facility providing campsites, stoves, restrooms, a swimming pool fed by the Green River, fish hatchery, and round picnic tables cut from six-foot sections of fir trees. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 28, 1983

By John Owen

They stood around in a wide circle, nudging the ball casually with their feet. Then it rolled toward Charley Minaglia, he executed a nifty two-step, and the ball exploded off the ground and slammed against a picnic table 20 yards away.

“Goal!” Pep Peery proclaimed and Charley Minaglia chuckled. “I guess that’s not too bad for an old guy 78 years old.”

The disclosure didn’t raise any eyebrows at the annual Soccer Oldtimers Picnic at Flaming Geyser Park. Minutes before, Chick Thompson had recited the names of every player on the 1929 Black Diamond team.

“But they’re all gone,” Chick said. “Rufe Weston and I are the only ones left and Rufe is 82.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 17, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

The latest business enterprise in Black Diamond is this second-hand store and pawn shop located next to the Morganville Tavern. (Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.)

The latest business enterprise in Black Diamond is this second-hand store and pawn shop located next to the Morganville Tavern. (Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 17, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

There are no ships or sealing wax, no cabbages or kings, but shoes plus a multitude of other items are now on display and for sale at “Funky and the Damn Near New.”

Located next to the Morganville Tavern in Black Diamond, Funky is the brainchild of owner Steve Novotny. He describes it as a second-hand store and pawn shop, intended in part to meet the needs of low-income families in the area. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 8, 2014

By Bill Kombol

The Green River Gorge is gorgeous to behold and a beautiful oasis on idyllic summer days. This June 1977 photo was taken by Vic Condiotty.

The Green River Gorge is gorgeous to behold and a beautiful oasis on idyllic summer days. This June 1977 photo was taken by Vic Condiotty.

The single-lane bridge over the Green River Gorge is a vista to behold as you cross 150 feet above the river; and even more remarkable when looking up. The bridge was built in 1915 to replace earlier wooden crossings that served the nearby coal mining town of Franklin founded in 1885 by the Oregon Improvement Company. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 10, 2016

By Bill Kombol

The Kummer Bridge spans 688 feet, is 28 feet wide, and stands 155 feet above the river. For that reason, it’s sometimes called the high bridge.

The Kummer Bridge spans 688 feet, is 28 feet wide, and stands 155 feet above the river. For that reason, it’s sometimes called the high bridge.

This view of the Kummer Bridge over the Green River was taken October 1, 1939, by a Seattle Times photographer. The steel truss bridge was constructed in 1932-1933, to provide a more direct route between Black Diamond and Enumclaw. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »