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Posts Tagged ‘football’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 12, 1925

During the summer months H.H. Boyd, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s agency in Wenatchee, prepared for a big season this winter. He had the storage bins of the Wenatchee yard remodeled to permit a quicker and more economical handling of the coal. This view is from the east side, showing how the railroad cars are unloaded. Trucks can drive directly over the tracks and into the bins. Mr. Boyd is a popular citizen of Wenatchee, prominent in lodge and civic affairs. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 1915

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922We have not had a Bulletin lately, because the editor has been so busy he could not find time to write for one. Furthermore, the necessity for appeals to the reason of our employees is not now nearly so great as it was about this time a year ago, when the first Bulletin was issued.

Since then the agitators and disturbance-makers have gone away, or have subsided, so that peace and harmony now prevails between the company and its employees.

This is as it should be. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe-News, October 20, 1978

By Jim Blubaugh

John Malgarini is still playing soccer at the age of 54.

John Malgarini still playing soccer at 54.

Over 35 years ago, when John Malgarini was a youngster in Black Diamond, a soccer ball was a major part of his life.

While kids at a lot of other schools tossed around a football at recess, youngsters in Black Diamond played with a soccer ball. “There weren’t enough kids in school to field a football team, so they gave us a soccer ball at recess,” Malgarini recalls.

Today, at 54, Malgarini still plays soccer. He’s the oldest player on the Renton Division A Senior (over 30) team entered in the Washington State Soccer League.

Soccer big before

If you happen to think that the history of soccer in Washington started with the boom of 1965, Malgarini is living proof that the sport was big in some Valley towns many years ago. It was big in places such as Black Diamond, Ravensdale, Issaquah, Carbonado and parts of Seattle before the turn of the century. (more…)

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Originally published in The Washington Teamster, date unknown [most likely 1984]

“Tilting the Windmill,” a newspaper column by Ed Donohoe, appeared in The Washington Teamster from 1950 until 1984.

By Ed Donohoe

“My dad was self-educated and insisted that all the kids received the best education possible. He was a voracious reader—read everything he could lay his hands on. Mom, God rest her soul, was just the opposite. She was old-fashioned in her ways. She really fractured the king’s English. She called sugar diabetes ‘sugar-by-Jesus.’ They were great people.”

This was Diamond Joe Paglia talking, always to a small cluster of friends, in a bistro maybe noted for its good Italian food and passable grape; with that perpetual smile on his face, daring you to top him on any subject. Joe could go all night and never miss a beat. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, May 1986

By Jack Reeves

If baseball scouts had visited Black Diamond during the heyday of our local baseball teams, how many boys might have made the big leagues? Pictured here is our 1928 team. Back: Frank Grgurich, John Buck, Joe Paglia, Joe Malachnick, Meg Pierotti, Bill Cushing, Lou La Fray, Unknown, Rufe Weston. Front: Unknown, Unknown, John Buck, Jr., Gordon Gray, Joe Spencer, Tom Meredith.

If baseball scouts had visited Black Diamond during the heyday of our local baseball teams, how many boys might have made the big leagues? Pictured here is our 1928 team. Back: Frank Grgurich, John Buck, Joe Paglia, Joe Malachnick, Meg Pierotti, Bill Cushing, Lou La Fray, Unknown, Rufe Weston. Front: Unknown, Unknown, John Buck, Jr., Gordon Gray, Joe Spencer, Tom Meredith.

Although I have never lived in Black Diamond, I do have many pleasant memories of Black Diamond during my high school days at Vashon High School.

We were in the same athletic league as Black Diamond and we journeyed to your interesting town several times to play basketball and baseball. I also remember the fine athletes and the enthusiastic supporters that came to back their favorite team.

The most outstanding athlete who I remember was a young man named Joe Paglia. He seemed to be the one who sparked the team and spoiled our chances of winning. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, April 2002

By Gordon and Conrad “Coke” Roberts

[As we looked back on our “growing up” in Black Diamond, here are our thoughts about the people and events who we felt had an effect on our lives.]

People Who Made A Difference

Louis Carnino, janitor at the grade school from 1933 to 1952. Always friendly and interested in people, it is said that in the early days he would visit the local hospital and soothe uneasy patients by singing to them (BDHS calendar series, 1988).

Louis Carnino, janitor at the grade school from 1933 to 1952. Always friendly and interested in people, it is said that in the early days he would visit the local hospital and soothe uneasy patients by singing to them (BDHS calendar series, 1988).

First in our thoughts was Mr. Babb, who worked for the Pacific Coast Coal Company as the town maintenance manager. He was a real organizer who was friendly and caring with a special interest in helping kids. He had an enthusiasm that was contagious. Obviously the school system and its teachers were along with our parents, a strong guiding force in our young lives. We remember very well Mr. Nelson, who was the superintendent. He set the tone not only for the kids but also his staff of teachers. He was always firm but fair. After leaving our school District in 1942, he went on to become superintendent of the Mount Vernon School system.

Mr. Hogle was vice principal from 1938-1939 and Mr. Watson took over as vice principal in 1940-1941. Both men taught science and math plus being our basketball and baseball coach. Mr. Watson, who was son of the President of Seattle Pacific College, went from Black Diamond to the University of California at Berkley to become a professor of Nuclear Science. (more…)

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