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Posts Tagged ‘Fourth of July’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 21, 1923

Just to indicate where some of the coal goes which the mines at Black Diamond, Newcastle, and Burnett are constantly producing, the Bulletin this week presents a few scenes recently taken at the coal bunkers of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

In the upper corner to the left is shown long rows of sacked Black Diamond lump, waiting to be loaded on the naval vessel, Gold Star, the steamer to the right in the oval just below. This coal, 36,378 sacks, was shipped to various Government schools and radio stations in Alaska. The center view shows the ship’s sling loading coal into the hold. On the right, upper view, is another scene showing the sacked coal ready for shipment, while below is the steamer Birmingham City taking steam coal for her own boilers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1923

If working a shift in Black Diamond Mine was no harder for the four men shown above than it was for them to pose for this picture, there would always be a mad scramble among the men to see who could get the first man-trip down.

At the left we introduce to you, George Belt, and next to him, Fred Cunningham, a former Issaquah miner. The man next in line is R.E. “Curly” Campbell and the young Hercules at the extreme right is Darwin Walton. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 7, 1923

In keeping with the Bulletin’s policy of acquainting its readers with all phases of the company’s activities, we take pleasure this week in introducing the efficient force of the Everett agency of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. Here, as in Wenatchee, Portland, Tacoma, and Juneau, the agency force is constantly exerting every effort to increase the sales of briquets and Black Diamond, South Prairie, Newcastle, and Issaquah coals.

The picture shown above was taken on the occasion of a banquet on Saturday, May 26, at which Manager Charles O. Hilen presided. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 31, 1923

While the miner digs the coal and the men at the bunkers see that it is properly prepared for shipment, there are some very important men mid-way between these two, without whom it would be almost impossible to keep the coal moving.

In the picture shown above the Bulletin presents three representatives of the men we refer to, namely: Harold Cooper, sprager; Ralph Walker, oiler; and Wm. Himes, motorman. The fact that each of them has just received the latest Bulletin is not the sole reason they are smiling, for in about five more minutes the whistle will blow, the signal for a dash to the “dry,” a shower and then everything will be ready for supper.


No plans for Fourth of July celebration

No definite plans for the celebration of the Fourth of July at any of the camps have yet been announced.

The magnitude of the celebration which is to be staged in Seattle, including the visit of President Harding, is expected to be such a drawing card that there is not much sentiment apparent in favor of a big inter-camp picnic. The matter of celebrating the day is now up to the camps and decision for a joint or individual celebration will shortly be made.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 24, 1923

Every mine has its firebosses, but Newcastle is willing to stack its supervisory force against that of any other mine in the world, confident of winning first honors anywhere. To back up their boasts they present herewith the photograph of a group taken recently, most of whom had just come off shift. From left to right they are:

A. Elmer Anderson, Dick Richards, Mine Foreman Chas. Lumley, John Eck, Joe Daler, Wm. Bowie, and W.E. Jones. (more…)

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Republished in the Voice of the Valley, July 17, 1974

Edited by Dorothy Church

From the Maplevalley Messenger, July 14, 1921

Way Back WhenA double defeat at the hands of the Lester and Nagrom teams greeted Maplevalley on their journey into the mountains last Sunday.

Evidently the long train ride, high attitude, and rough grounds were too much of a handicap for the valley boys, and although they put up a good fight against Lester, the final score stood 10-9 against them. Numerous errors, due to the condition of the grounds which had just been cleared of stumps, were largely to blame for their defeat.


The Fourth of July picnic and dance proved a huge success and drew the largest crowd ever gathered together in Maplevalley on any occasion.

The races were interesting and created lots of excitement, the young ladies’ race being won by Miss Holt; the fat ladies’ race by Mrs. Berrisford; the ladies’ race by Mrs. Davies; boys’ race, Johnny Vickery; men’s race, Russell Vickery; girls’ race, Eva Vickery; pie-eating contest, August Hedin; three-legged race, Ethel Maxwell and Elvita Edgman.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 13, 1922

By Mrs. A.M. Ireland

G.M. MacMillan: When they wanted someone who could make a real speech to deliver the Fourth of July oration at Black Diamond they unanimously selected Mac, who, in addition to being a regular miner, is one of the Bulletin’s correspondents at Issaquah. They don’t make ‘em much better than Mac. Here he is, badge and all, just as he looked after telling the folks at the picnic how the Liberators came to write the Declaration of Independence.

G.M. MacMillan: When they wanted someone who could make a real speech to deliver the Fourth of July oration at Black Diamond they unanimously selected Mac, who, in addition to being a regular miner, is one of the Bulletin’s correspondents at Issaquah. They don’t make ‘em much better than Mac. Here he is, badge and all, just as he looked after telling the folks at the picnic how the Liberators came to write the Declaration of Independence.

Although the Bulletin had its entire staff at the Fourth of July picnic at Black Diamond, there were a few items he overlooked. I can understand this, and even sympathize, seeing the staff is a man who had his eyes full of dust and his shoes filled with sand, at that.

A man has a way of not being able to see things, even without the dust and sand, and I know of some married men who can’t even find a collar button or a tie without help. They’ll yell like murder, even though the tie and button are right on the dresser before them, and their wives will have to drop what they are doing to show them where the things are.

Men seem to suffer strange loss of vision at times and it always takes us women to open their eyes for them.

So I am not surprised at the oversight of the Bulletin staff, being as he is a male, and I am only contributing this information because there were some who helped in the picnic who deserve mention. Notably those who took part in the parade, those who worked so hard decorating the floats, and the men and women who helped generally.

The dear little children who rode in the parade, were the nearest things to angels I’ve seen, and I know the Bulletin wants to make friendly mention of some of them. They looked so sweet in their finery, I am certain everyone who saw them, even those not related to them, I mean, were proud they were part of a company celebration.

You got an idea of the kind of people that work for the company, or are friendly to it, by looking at the children. (more…)

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