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Posts Tagged ‘Fourth of July’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 20, 1924

When the man-trip starts down the slope at Newcastle Mine the men who are going on shift are always ready and waiting. This group was caught by the photographer just before they went on shift. In the front row can be seen H.G. Hagenbush, B.E. Van Alstine, A.C. Marsh, Frank Oriet, Walter Trover, Joe Daler, Otto Sproat, Victor Nelson, Robt. Joughin, and Geo. Brandon. In the back are A.L. Richards, Wm. Eddy, V.J. Ryan, Frank Hollands, and H.S. Syverson. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 6, 1924

Pacific Coast coal was used to bunker the vessels of three foreign flags within the past week. First to call was the Nazareno, an Italian freighter under charter to the Bunge Western Grain Corporation. She is shown above to the left just as the big craft was being brought alongside the bunkers for loading. Her destination after leaving Seattle was Europe, though at this writing she is ashore in the Columbia River.

The center picture shows the Wilhelm Hemsoth, a German ship, taking Black Diamond and South Prairie bunker coal. She sails this week for Australia.

At the right the graceful lines of the British freighter, Dramatist, show up to good advantage as she pulls out for Glasgow. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 30, 1924

One institution of which Burnett is justly proud is the company store, a picture of which is herewith shown. L.W. Foreman is the capable and accommodating manager of the store and with his efficient corps of helpers he is making it an institution of real service to the camp.

A prompt delivery service is maintained, which with the high quality of the merchandise carried, is another one of the reasons for the general appeal of the company store to all residents of Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 26, 1923

Though off to a late start, the aggregation of baseball ability shown above is now winning honors for Black Diamond and before the season ends is confident there will be few teams with a higher figure in the percentage column.

These are the boys who gave Newcastle a close run for their money on the Fourth of July and the line-up which will cross bats with Burnett next Sunday.

The line-up of the team includes: Chambers, ss; Kertis, 2b; Garcey, 3b; Bowen, c; Hydorn p; Wasmund, 1b; Connell, lf; Maroni, cf; Rockey, rf. Jack Kravagna, in front, is the mascot, and the man with the straw hat is Bert Arthur, team manager. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 19, 1923

Another instance of what is being done constantly all over the Northwest to sell the products of the Pacific Coast Coal Company mines is shown in the cut above. This shows a booth arranged by the Pacific Coast Coal agency in Everett at a Household Appliance Show a short time ago.

Note the slogan, “We Can Make It Hot for You,” and below the grate filled with burning Diamond Briquets. In a briquet guessing contest conducted by the company in connection with the exhibit, more than 1,800 contestants entered, most of who made good prospects for business. Charles O. Hilen is the manager of the Everett agency. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 5, 1923

Black Diamond was saddened the past week by the accidental deaths of two of the men employed in the mine, Frank Eltz, inside laborer, who met his death on Wednesday, June 27, and Joe Spinks, inside laborer, who followed Eltz over the Divide two days later, Friday, June 29.

Eltz was 37 years of age, born in Austria, March 20, 1886. He came to the United States in 1913, and has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company since August 1921. He was working in the gangway of the 12th level, north, at 5:30 p.m., when a large piece of rock fell from the roof, killing him instantly. (more…)

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