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Posts Tagged ‘German’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, November 13, 1996

By Casey Olson
The Courier-Herald

No video tape in the world could hold the rich history of the Black Diamond community.

There is just too much of it.

But give Bob Eaton and Micki Ryan a lot of credit. The pair is undertaking the mission impossible and attempting to put together the first-ever video history of the history-rich town.

They’ve found the task fascinating and time consuming.

The coal mining industry brought immigrants from all around the world to the tiny hamlet nestled in the Cascade foothills during the late 1800s and early 1900s, turning the quiet community into a bustling city. Italians, Greeks, Chinese, Germans, Hungarians, and Irish were blended together every day, a clash of cultures that helped form the modern day community of Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 1, 1889

Attempting to burglarize a cabin, he is mortally shot—betrayed by accomplice

William D. Kelly, alias Frank Murphy, was shot by Special Officer Webber, while making a burglarious entrance to the cabin of Michaely Krause, at Black Diamond, about 10 o’clock Monday night.

Kelly, who was a young man not over 30 years of age, came to Black Diamond from New York City a little over a year ago. Since that time he has been employed, off and on, by Thomas F. Smart, who has the contract for getting out timbers for the Black Diamond mines. He bore a hard name in camp and it was generally believed that he was an ex-convict. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 4, 2016

By Bill Kombol

Proprietors Paul and Hannah Knoernschild, standing to the left of the horse and buggy, in the coal and clay mining town of Taylor.

Proprietors Paul and Hannah Knoernschild, standing to the left of the horse and buggy, in the coal and clay mining town of Taylor.

Taylor was a mining town located about 4 miles east of Hobart on a branch line of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. The area was first homesteaded by Sam Galloway, who discovered both coal and clay deposits in 1892.

Three years later the property was sold to Arthur Denny, who’d founded Seattle in 1852. He formed the Denny Clay Company, which opened the mines with the coal used to fire the clay manufactured into bricks, shingles, and sewer pipe. Over 633,000 tons of coal were mined and millions of clay products shipped. (more…)

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Originally published in The Issaquah Press, November 7, 1990

Paul Knoernschild married Hannah Wilkinson in 1908 in the mining town of Taylor, which was southeast of Issaquah. There is not much left of Taylor today, but there are still many of the couple’s descendants in this area. Photo courtesy of Mary Knoernschild Lewis.

Paul Knoernschild married Hannah Wilkinson in 1908 in the mining town of Taylor, which was southeast of Issaquah. There is not much left of Taylor today, but there are still many of the couple’s descendants in this area. Photo courtesy of Mary Knoernschild Lewis.

Paul Knoernschild, the son of German immigrants, was born in Milwaukee before the turn of the century. He came west to visit a brother in the early 1900s, and somehow ended up working in a grocery store in Taylor. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, October 20, 1989

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Diane and Corey Olson, who edited the history, are shown near the Black Diamond Museum. (Staff photo by Duane Hamamura.)

Diane and Corey Olson, who edited the history, are shown near the Black Diamond Museum. (Staff photo by Duane Hamamura.)

Voices out of Black Diamond’s past tell the story of mine disasters, whispered scandals, sports shenanigans and colorful characters in Black Diamond: Mining the Memories.

Tales spun by the Welsh, Italian, Slavic and other settlers of the town—dependent on the mines for its lifeblood—weave a lively pattern of poignant portraits of hard life and high times in Black Diamond. (more…)

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The King County Office of Cultural Resources has nominated the Black Diamond Cemetery for the National Register of Historic Places.

The King County Office of Cultural Resources has nominated the Black Diamond Cemetery for the National Register of Historic Places.

Originally published in the South County Journal, January 26, 2000

By Mike Archbold

BLACK DIAMOND — The only known historic photograph of the Black Diamond Cemetery dates back to 1920 and shows a pointed picket fence with a hearse entrance and a gate under a wooden archway.

A set of wooden stairs crosses over the fence, which kept the horses and cows from wandering into the community cemetery; the stairs allowed easy access for visitors on foot.

Today, a modern chain link fence has replaced the picket fence. A gravel road allows entrance to the cemetery that still serves the one-time mining community that once lived around it. Family plot enclosure fences are gone for easier maintenance of the lawn.

Except for those few changes, according to Kathryn Krafft, a landmark specialist with the King County Office of Cultural Resources, the cemetery is a well-preserved example of a unique mining-company town and community cemetery. (more…)

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