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Posts Tagged ‘golf’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 14, 1976

By D’Ann Pedee

Bicentennial quilt: Thirty Maple Valley women are now putting the finishing touches on a handcrafted quilt as part of their Bicentennial year activities. The thirty patches, some of which are shown above, will depict this area historically, spotlighting some of its past and present. — Voice photo by Bob Gerbing

How do you place a value on a handcrafted quilt?

Perhaps by the amount of money it can be sold for or by averaging the time and services spent in completing it.

When finished, the Maple Valley Arts Committee could possibly have a three-thousand-dollar product on its hands. That’s the amount of money it is hoped will raised by raffling be of the Bicentennial quilt that thirty local women are in the process of completing. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, April 25, 1979

This picture, taken during the fire which destroyed the old clubhouse at the Lake Wilderness Golf Course, shows firemen battling the blaze. The upper story has already burned down, but the two chimney stacks are still standing. Before it was over, the whole building, for all practical purposes, was completely destroyed, says Ray Colman, owner. (Photo courtesy Pat Simone.)

This picture, taken during the fire which destroyed the old clubhouse at the Lake Wilderness Golf Course, shows firemen battling the blaze. The upper story has already burned down, but the two chimney stacks are still standing. Before it was over, the whole building, for all practical purposes, was completely destroyed, says Ray Colman, owner. (Photo courtesy Pat Simone.)

The old clubhouse at the Lake Wilderness Golf Course was destroyed in a spectacular fire on Sunday, April 8.

According to Ray Colman, owner of the well-known Maple Valley landmark, the fire started when two young boys set papers on fire inside the building. They were spotted leaving the building and were apprehended later when they returned to view the blaze.

The clubhouse dates back to 1929, Colman says. “It was where the Chamber of Commerce held their first meetings. The Lions Club also held their first meetings there, and for many years it was a social center for numerous other parties and groups in the area.”

The building was originally constructed by Kain Gaffney and Ed Long. They started out by serving chicken dinners there. Gaffney and Long at one time also owned the Lake Wilderness Golf Course and later Gaffney’s Resort on the lake. They were both well-known musicians in the area. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 7, 1979

(This is the second in a series of feature articles written by students in Tahoma’s Beginning Journalism class. Steve Eichelberger, a senior, lives in Hobart where he became acquainted with Dorothy Iverson. She remembers when her small community housed the largest lumber mill in the Northwest.)

By Steve Eichelberger

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

For many years, Dorothy Iverson was a homemaker.

“Women didn’t work in those days,” she said about her early life in Hobart. Mrs. Iverson was born in Seattle where she lived with her three older brothers and three younger sisters before moving to Hobart while in the seventh grade.

She remains there today where she still helps operate the Hobart store.

Mrs. Iverson attended school in what is now the Hobart Grange and graduated from Tahoma, where she had been editor of the high school newspaper and class valedictorian.

She attended Wilson Business College in Seattle and after graduation was a secretary in Seattle for four years.

She married the late Iver Iverson in 1933 and they set up housekeeping in Hobart. Iver was employed at his father’s grocery store, the “Wood and Iverson Grocery Store,” where he continued to work until it burned in 1939. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 24, 1974

With Mount Rainier in the background Frank Sayers of Maple Valley approaches the sixth green of what will be known far and wide next spring as the Wilderness Ridge Country Club Golf Course. Big things are anticipated in the way of improvements for this Maple Valley landmark. (Picture by Lowell Lorenz.)

With Mount Rainier in the background Frank Sayers of Maple Valley approaches the sixth green of what will be known far and wide next spring as the Wilderness Ridge Country Club Golf Course. Big things are anticipated in the way of improvements for this Maple Valley landmark. (Picture by Lowell Lorenz.)

Lake Wilderness Golf Course and Country Club will move fully to new quarters by the end of July. The newly completed pro shop is already operating in the unfinished Wilderness Ridge Country Club, serving the many users of the nine hole fairways that were opened a few weeks ago.

Owner Ron Coleman anticipates that by spring golfers will have a choice between the then completed 18 hole regulation championship course or the older shorter executive course of the lower level offering nine holes of play.

The new scenic course is going over big. In 18 days it collected a club membership of 450 men and over 100 women. The old club had a membership of only 137.

Coleman has owned the Lake Wilderness Club since 1946, first in partnership, then in 1950 as sole owner. Wife Gwen has worked with him as well as son Ron, a recognized. pro.

Building golf courses is nothing new for Coleman. This is his thirteenth, having built such courses as Alderbrook in South Hood Canal, Golf Land in Tacoma, and Tam O’ Shanter, and having completed the Fairwood course. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 19, 1927

Delightful spot, only 28 miles distant, is called a bit of Switzerland at door of Seattle

By Ellis Coe

1—Stretch of pavement through Maple Valley—the Reo Wolverine with Fred Lamping at the wheel. The tall maples towering overhead offer shade and hazards as well for the new Maple Valley Golf and Country Club seen in the background. 2—Rustic wood bridge dividing Lake Lucerne from the upper lake, formerly Pipe Lake. Both lakes are generally known now as Lake Lucerne. The clearing in the foreground is to be landscaped and on it will be built a summer home for W.T. Burwell. 3—Placid Lake Lucerne from the north shore looking toward the picnic groves with the hostess house and the canoe house in view. Fred Lamping and Miss Times Representative are seen contentedly paddling about in the canoe. 4—Entrance to Lucerne fashioned from the giant firs. The pillars present an imposing appearance that impresses one with the rustic beauty that awaits as one continues on through the gateway.

1—Stretch of pavement through Maple Valley—the Reo Wolverine with Fred Lamping at the wheel. The tall maples towering overhead offer shade and hazards as well for the new Maple Valley Golf and Country Club seen in the background. 2—Rustic wood bridge dividing Lake Lucerne from the upper lake, formerly Pipe Lake. Both lakes are generally known now as Lake Lucerne. The clearing in the foreground is to be landscaped and on it will be built a summer home for W.T. Burwell. 3—Placid Lake Lucerne from the north shore looking toward the picnic groves with the hostess house and the canoe house in view. Fred Lamping and Miss Times Representative are seen contentedly paddling about in the canoe. 4—Entrance to Lucerne fashioned from the giant firs. The pillars present an imposing appearance that impresses one with the rustic beauty that awaits as one continues on through the gateway.

Beautiful Lake Lucerne—and after one visits it the adjective seems to become a passion. The more often it is repeated the more beautiful it seems. It is often said of Lucerne that it is a bit of Switzerland almost at the side door of Seattle.

Thousands of motorists of the Northwest clamber for a bit of nature’s rare beauty. They drive miles upon miles to seek it. By following the map on this page, within less than an hour of easy driving, as one goes through the rustic way to Lucerne there will be unfolded one of the real gems of scenic grandeur in the Northwest. (more…)

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Golf

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 1, 1929

Kacer and Cooney. Barnyard Golf Champions of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Kacer and Cooney. Barnyard Golf Champions of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Golf is a form of physical and mental exertion made attractive by the fact that you have to dress for it in a $200,000 club house.

Golf is what letter-carrying, ditch-digging, and carpet-beating would be if those three tasks had to be performed in the same hot afternoon in short pants and colored socks.

Golf is the simplest looking game in the world when you decide to take it up, and the toughest after you have been at it ten or twelve years.

The game is played on carefully selected grass with little white balls and as many clubs as the player can afford. These little balls cost from 75¢ to $25 and it is possible to support a family of ten people (all adults) for five months on the money represented by the balls lost by some golfers in a single afternoon. (more…)

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