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Posts Tagged ‘Great Depression’

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2016

By William Kombol

Kuzaro home, November 18, 1939

Kuzaro home, November 18, 1939

There are a number of resources available to learn about the history of your home or lot. One of the best resources is the Puget Sound Regional Archives (PSRA), located on the campus of Bellevue College near Eastgate.

PSRA’s collection includes property record cards kept between 1937 and 1972. This is the best source of historic photographs for homes and commercial buildings. These old photos were taken by the King County Assessor with the tax parcel, date of the photo, and other notations written on the photo, from which excellent quality prints can be made. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1993

By Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Sunday dinners and holidays were some of the special times at the Olson mansion on 216th, recalled Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and some of his nephews and nieces as they gathered at the mansion on September 20th for the historical society’s monthly program.

Eight Olson children, five boys and three girls, grew up in the home built about 1905. Roosevelt, known as Teddy, is the only son still living. Two daughters, Mrs. Adeline Oien of Kent, and Mrs. Anne Thompson, Seattle, are also still living. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 22, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930, now serves as the Pacific States Condominiums. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

At the end the Kent-Kangley Road east of Maple Valley is the mill town of Selleck, which still exists today; next door was the town of Lavender, or “Jap Town.” The mill is gone, but the school is still there and about 16 of the original houses. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 1995

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Vivian Mathison talked about her school days at the April 17th Hobart get-together sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

My name is Vivian Mathison. I was Vivian Kelley when I lived in Hobart from 1930 to 1939. My family moved to Hobart from Kerriston on March 17, 1930.

Our family consisted of our parents, Will and Maude Kelley, Lois, Vera, Grace, and me. Also Mike, our black and white Spitz dog given to us by the Higgins family when they moved away.

I was 10 years old when we moved to Hobart and I entered Miss Bock’s 4th grade. My special friend right away was Vivian Peterson. We were the two Vivs, and remained best friends all through school, attending Tahoma and graduating in 1938.

From my point of remembrance our family’s special friends were the W.D. Thompsons, the Lonnie Triggs, Norma Purdy, Vivian Peterson, Dave Conard, and Gerald Bartholomew. My sister Lois and Gerald, and Dave and I enjoyed going to the dances at Lake Wilderness. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 12, 1975

Following is the second in a series of interviews with early Maple Valley residents by Tahoma Junior High students in Mrs. Vicci Beck’s history class.

By Teresa Hensley

75 years in Maple Valley: Ruth Knadle. (Photo by Kevin McLellan.)

75 years in Maple Valley: Ruth Knadle. (Photo by Kevin McLellan.)

Ruth Knadle has been living in this area ever since she was born, and because of this she has acquired an insight into this community’s past that few can match. In her cozy house on Sweeney Road, the author had a chance to view a part of Maple Valley’s past through her eyes.

Mrs. Knadle was born in the Maple Valley area on Sept. 16, 1901, the second to the youngest of a family of eight. Out of six children, she was the only girl.

Her parents were homesteaders who settled here in 1885. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 2, 1972

By Don Duncan

Matthew McTurk (left) and Richard H. Parry

Matthew McTurk (left) and Richard H. Parry

Richard H. Parry, stocky Welshman, turned 90 the other day. Parry and Matthew McTurk, 85, a wiry Scot, recalled the days when they almost really owed their souls to the company store.

Not in Appalachia, mind you. But right here in Washington State, where human moles burrowed into the ground at Roslyn, Black Diamond, Ravensdale, Wilkeson and Carbonado and the basement coal bin was as much a part the home as the kitchen icebox.

At times Parry and McTurk disagreed loudly on historical points—“Now you shut up and let me tell it”—but it was all noise and no heat; the disagreement of old, old friends. Afterward they embraced warmly. (more…)

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