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Posts Tagged ‘Green River Gorge’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 12, 1934

Payroll statement is clue that leads to recovery of loot and arrest of 3 Wednesday

Jack’s Place, ca. 1940, was located near the Green River Gorge Resort on the east side of the river.

Jack’s Place, ca. 1940, was located near the Green River Gorge Resort on the east side of the river.

A Pacific Coast Coal Company payroll statement, picked up near the service station operated by George Tethaway, at Green River Gorge proved the “clue” that led to the arrest late Wednesday afternoon of G.M. Smith, Chester Justice, and Glen Braemer, Black Diamond mine workers, and the lodging of the trio in the King County jail, awaiting probable charges of burglary.

The arrests were made by Deputy Sheriff Tom Smith of Enumclaw, Highway Patrolman Bill Ross of Buckley, and Deputy Sheriffs Allingham and Sears, of Seattle—less than twenty-four hours after Tethaway and Jack Rudgers had reported to Enumclaw police the burglary of their respective service stations at Green River Gorge. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 11, 1978

By George and Dianne Wilson

When we initially talked with outgoing mayor Gomer Evans about this article, we asked that he give thought to three basic questions: “When you took office, what problems did you face?”; “What do you feel you accomplished during your term of office?”; and now, “Where do you go from here?” His description of the accomplishments clearly defines the problems faced. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Eagle, August 31, 1988

Annual picnic source of stories of coal, men

By Gordon Koestler

Retired miners John Streepy (left) and George Savicke shared a tale or two. (Eagle photo by Gordon Koestler.)

Retired miners John Streepy (left) and George Savicke shared a tale or two. (Eagle photo by Gordon Koestler.)

Deep within the spine of the Cascade Mountains, on either side of the summit, lie still-large coal reserves. Over the past 100 or so years, men like John Costanich, John Streepy, and George Savicke, supported by women like Mary Mihelich, have pulled the black diamonds out of mines near places like Wilkeson, Palmer, Roslyn, Carbonado, Cle Elum and, yes, Black Diamond.

Saturday, such men and women met to celebrate and remember that lifestyle at the annual Miners’ Picnic, conducted at a private park at the base of the Green River Gorge. Such luminaries as former U.S. Sen. Slade Gordon, now campaigning to return to the Senate, and Renton area state Rep. Mike Patrick thought enough of the Miners’ Picnic to attend the afternoon gathering, and King County Executive Tim Hill, 8th District Congressman Rod Chandler, and 31st District Rep. Ernie Crane were scheduled to put in appearances as well. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 17, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

The latest business enterprise in Black Diamond is this second-hand store and pawn shop located next to the Morganville Tavern. (Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.)

The latest business enterprise in Black Diamond is this second-hand store and pawn shop located next to the Morganville Tavern. (Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 17, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

There are no ships or sealing wax, no cabbages or kings, but shoes plus a multitude of other items are now on display and for sale at “Funky and the Damn Near New.”

Located next to the Morganville Tavern in Black Diamond, Funky is the brainchild of owner Steve Novotny. He describes it as a second-hand store and pawn shop, intended in part to meet the needs of low-income families in the area. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 15, 1920

Seattle motorists afforded opportunity to enjoy big variety of scenery and save on their gasoline

Pretty little resort welcomes all guests

Times’ tours party takes trip and writer describes routes and what may be seen at end of journey

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

These photographs show the beauties of Green River Gorge, within easy reach of motorists from Seattle. 1—Placid Deep Lake on the way to the gorge. 2—The turbulent river far below the steel bridge across the gorge. 3—The swift-moving river, perpetual agent of erosion, works its way in the gorge ever deeper and deeper between the walls of stone.

One of most desirable features of Puget Sound motoring is that within a very short distance of Seattle there are literally dozens of beautiful runs, some long, some short, but all interesting and attractive. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 16, 1975

By D’Ann Pedee

Like the Olympia slogan, maybe “it’s the water.”

Then again, it could be the woods, or the peace, or the pace. Whatever “it” is, there is definitely a “something” which lures Maple Valley people back to Maple Valley.

And so it has been with Kathreen Mechem, an attorney who lives on Lake Sawyer. Although it took her thirty years, she is now back with a home on property which her family has owned for fifty years. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, April 9, 1980

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

The dotted line shows the area to be covered by the communities plan.

TAHOMA-RAVEN HEIGHTS — More than 115 years ago the discovery of vast coal deposits drew settlers to the remote Squak Mountain, Issaquah and Newcastle regions. But now the sprawling reserves of undeveloped land are spawning rapid growth in the 150-square mile area from Issaquah south to Black Diamond.

So last August, King County planners assisting a citizens’ committee began the tremendous task of planning for the future of what is called the Tahoma/Raven Heights Communities Plan area—the largest plan undertaken so far.

A recently prepared profile on Tahoma/Raven Heights shows that between 1970 and 1980, the population has grown from about 19,500 to about 26,000. And forecasts indicate a population of almost 40,000 by 1990. (more…)

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