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Posts Tagged ‘Green River Gorge’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 11, 1926

Not only does the Black Diamond Band appeal to the ear with its melodies and martial airs, but the boys present a striking appearance in their natty new uniforms as well. This picture is published that those who heard the Black Diamond Band over the radio recently may know that they are an attractively garbed organization. Frank Carroll, director of the band, is a musician of years of experience and organizer of the famed Bellingham Elks’ Band. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 7, 1984

Coal mining plan faces opposition

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

Bill Kombol, manager of Palmer Coking Coal Co. in Black Diamond, stands amid a stand of Douglas fir trees on reclaimed land that was part of the McKay Surface Mine in 1974-1976. The pit mine was dug as deep as 40 feet in some places to reach coal. Richard S. Hevza/Seattle Times

Douglas firs ranging from a foot to 10 feet high grow branchtip to branchtip along two narrow strips of generally clear land near Black Diamond.

A few short years ago these same corridors, hewn out of second- and third-growth forest, were sliced open to extract black diamonds—coal. The open ugly sores were the Palmer Coking Coal Company’s McKay and Gem Surface Mines. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 2, 2008

By Lauren Vane
Times Southeast bureau

Black Diamond is surrounded by green, with natural treasures—trees, crystal-clear waterways, and the Green River Gorge—that can’t be found in big cities.

As it transitions from a small rural community to one three times its size, city leaders have decided that it will remain green.

If the City Council lets a 12-year building moratorium expire at the end of March, as expected, the city’s population could triple. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, February 18, 1998

Pending rate increase would provide funds for much-needed improvements, say city officials

By Paul Schmidt
The Courier-Herald

Dan DalSanto scans the surrounding landscape after returning from a trip across the Green River over a suspension bridge that carries Black Diamond’s water supply. (Photo by Paul Schmidt)

For years Black Diamond officials have postponed most major improvements to the city’s water system, firm in their hope they would eventually tap into a new, high-capacity, Tacoma-owned water line.

Money spent for a larger reservoir and related components would be redundant, especially with the long-planned Pipeline 5 in the future, its route designed to cut through the middle of town.

So went the thinking, says Public Works Director Dan DalSanto.

Pipeline 5’s future is now in some doubt with the endangered species listing of Puget Sound Chinook salmon. But having waited all these years for the pipeline to arrive, Black Diamond finds itself with a water system fast needing improvements and expanded capacity. (more…)

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5-year project to put life back into Franklin

Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 11, 1994

By Keith Ervin
Seattle Times South bureau

Lindsay Larson leads a group of students through the old cemetery they are cleaning up. Many of the deaths were caused by mining accidents. (Jimi Lott, Seattle Times)

HISTORIC FRANKLIN—Hidden beneath the maples and cottonwoods of the Green River Gorge are secrets unseen by the casual visitor.

Some of those secrets are a little more visible today than they were yesterday, thanks to eighth-graders from Cedar Heights Junior High School in Covington. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 28, 1926

New Black Diamond Mine was visited by the representatives of the Sales Department as a part of the two-day program last week. In the mine the salesmen saw visual evidence of the company’s confidence in the future of the coal industry. The picture of the group was taken at the face of the gangway after they had walked in from the main entrance. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 25, 1989

Fire Chief John Bukoskey provided the Black Diamond City Council with a blueprint peek at Fire District 17’s planned support fire station in the Lake Sawyer area at its regular council meeting Thursday.

The 3,700-square-foot support station, which will be built with a $500,000 bond issue voters approved in September, is scheduled for ground breaking in February and completion sometime in the fall.

The 22-man joint volunteer fire department—Black Diamond and King County District 17—covers an 18-square-mile radius and responds to the Black Diamond, Green River Gorge, Flaming Geyser, and Lake Sawyer areas. The planned low-maintenance, brick building will provide facilities for firefighters the current small station in Black Diamond cannot supply, like a classroom, kitchen, hose tower, and living space for a resident firefighter. (more…)

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