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Posts Tagged ‘Green River Gorge’

Originally published in the Maple Valley Reporter, July 8, 2011

By TJ Martinell

Gomer Evans, Sr. spars with an opponent in a match held at the town’s baseball field. The referee is George Avers, who also played on the Black Diamond baseball team.

At the turn of the century in Black Diamond the sport of boxing was a popular form of entertainment.

As a coal mining town, where all of the men worked long hours performing manual labor, it was capable of producing more than a few big, muscular men who could knock someone out with a single punch.

“We were all tough little buggers,” said Jack Thompson, who grew up on Baker Street.

Carl Steiert said as a boy he’d be shining shoes in the barbershop when boxers would put on their trunks in the back end room and warm up. His recollections were published in the book Black Diamond: Mining the Memories. (more…)

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Originally published in the News Tribune, June 6, 1997

By Bart Ripp

This restaurant verifies its first name.

It is famous.

Famous Black Diamond Bakery & Restaurant has been famous in the cozy South King County mining town as a bakery since 1902 and as an eating destination since 1983, when Doug Weiding bought the place.

I cannot think of a Western Washington town so synonymous with a place to eat. Say Black Diamond, and you think of dynamite bread. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 3, 1961

By Frank Lynch

Richard H. Parry and son Elvede with account of mine disaster (Post-Intelligencer photo).

Found (and at long, long last)—

A regional folk song and a regional hero.

Richard H. Parry lives at 4429 Rainier Ave. He was born in Wales, and he is a retired coal miner.

Some several weeks ago one of his sons, Arthur, found a Welsh language Bible at Goodwill. He bought same, presented it to his dad, and the elder Parry was delighted with it—and for several reasons.

The Bible is a handsome one—and well-illustrated. It is certainly very old.

There were several bits of Americana hidden in the pages—a Blue Ribbon Army (Temperance) pledge card, some Christmas cards, and scraps of Welsh verse and copy of a song sung over our own land by one W.D. Reese and entitled—

“The disaster at Franklin.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 29, 1926

Expressing their genuine pleasure at the recent return home of N.D. Moore, vice-president of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, the Black Diamond Band last Saturday evening serenaded Mr. and Mrs. Moore at their home, 618 Fullerton Street, Seattle. The affair was a complete surprise to Mr. Moore, who knew nothing whatever about it until the music started. After a short concert on the lawn the boys were invited in and served with refreshments. Accompanying the band were Supt. Paul Gallagher, A.W. Gray, and Geo. Upton.

Those in the band included Bandmaster Frank Carroll, Earl Manchester, Ray Rosso, Wm. Tretheway, H. Parkinson, VanManchester, Ed Lockridge, Thos. Hughes, G. Lile, F. Heister, Jim Boyd, H. Saarella, B.M. McVicar, Ed. Crossman, Al Winckworth, Fred Carroll, B. McDonald, Theo. Rouse, and Tony Schultz. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 25, 1925

One of the largest and most modern moonshine plants seized this year was raided by federal prohibition agents under Director Roy C. Lyle at 6 o’clock this morning on a ranch a short distance above Enumclaw near the Green River Gorge.

More than 135 gallons of newly run moonshine was seized and four men, Tony Fontello, D. Fontello, father and son; John Pinola and Paul Rocco were arrested.

An elaborate plant had been installed in a barn, according to the federal agents, equipped with running water, pumped by a gasoline engine. Two 100-gallon stills, hooked up in tandem, a new system, the agents say, so that the capacity of the stills was doubled, with a triple set of coolers and coils. Eleven 500-gallon mash tubs, one with a capacity of 1,000 gallons and another with a capacity of 1,500 gallons, were in use.

The plant had been in operation less than six weeks, the agents say.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 15, 1926

One of the institutions in Carbonado of which the camp is justly proud is the splendid Union Sunday School which recently passed the 100 mark in its membership. Mrs. J.W.L. Kaufman is the efficient superintendent of the Sunday School. She is assisted by a loyal corps of teachers and officers, all of whom are striving to make the organization even greater and better than it now is.

The Sunday School is undenominational, and it is unique in that all denominations and creeds represented are working in perfect harmony for the upbuilding of the religious and moral life of the community. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, April 11, 1915

County bridge just opened to traffic. The accompanying picture shows the new steel bridge across Green River at Franklin, which has just opened to traffic. It is 288 feet long and spans a gorge 155 feet deep.

With the completion and opening to traffic of the bridge over Green River at Franklin last week, the most important and most expensive unit of bond road project No. 9 has been completed by County Engineer Arthur P. Denton and his force. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 11, 1926

Not only does the Black Diamond Band appeal to the ear with its melodies and martial airs, but the boys present a striking appearance in their natty new uniforms as well. This picture is published that those who heard the Black Diamond Band over the radio recently may know that they are an attractively garbed organization. Frank Carroll, director of the band, is a musician of years of experience and organizer of the famed Bellingham Elks’ Band. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 7, 1984

Coal mining plan faces opposition

By Louis T. Corsaletti
Times suburban reporter

Bill Kombol, manager of Palmer Coking Coal Co. in Black Diamond, stands amid a stand of Douglas fir trees on reclaimed land that was part of the McKay Surface Mine in 1974-1976. The pit mine was dug as deep as 40 feet in some places to reach coal. Richard S. Hevza/Seattle Times

Douglas firs ranging from a foot to 10 feet high grow branchtip to branchtip along two narrow strips of generally clear land near Black Diamond.

A few short years ago these same corridors, hewn out of second- and third-growth forest, were sliced open to extract black diamonds—coal. The open ugly sores were the Palmer Coking Coal Company’s McKay and Gem Surface Mines. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 2, 2008

By Lauren Vane
Times Southeast bureau

Black Diamond is surrounded by green, with natural treasures—trees, crystal-clear waterways, and the Green River Gorge—that can’t be found in big cities.

As it transitions from a small rural community to one three times its size, city leaders have decided that it will remain green.

If the City Council lets a 12-year building moratorium expire at the end of March, as expected, the city’s population could triple. (more…)

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