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Posts Tagged ‘Green River Gorge’

Originally published in the South County Journal, January 14, 2001

By Mike Archbold
Journal Reporter

Dan O’Brien/Journal

BLACK DIAMOND — There is a dancing light in the woods that offers a respite from the deep damp of winter.

Nestled beneath a snag forest of trunks and branches covered with moss, a rock pit glimmers in the late afternoon at the state park south of here. Not far away, the Green River rushes; Christy Creek gurgles closer.

The flaming geyser of Flaming Geyser State Park is a sprightly flame of methane gas 8 to 12 inches high that undulates atop a concrete pad. The wind sometimes blows it out, but the methane keeps on coming from deep underground, where fractured rivers of coal millions of years old still lie. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 14, 1926

This Link-Belt moveable crane is used at the Briquet Plant not only to load Diamond Briquets from the storage platform into the cars, but also to load coal from the storage piles into cars preparatory to sending it through the plant. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 24, 1925

Though these men are not on jury duty no court could find a more impartial nor fair-minded group than the Black Diamond supervisors shown in the accompanying halftone. For confirmation of this statement just ask any miner or workman employed at the mine. The group, from left to right, includes, Jack Emmanuel, Richard Parry, Tom Edwards, E.D. Rockey, and Robt. Cruickshank. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, May 26,1902

Franklin coal mines

Franklin coal mines

W.G. Hartanft, county superintendent of schools, has made arrangements for the teachers to spend a day at the Franklin and Black Diamond coal mines. These mines are situated just at the entrance of Green River Canyon, among delightfully interesting scenes of the Cascades.

The excursion train will leave from the Ocean dock at the foot of Washington Street, Saturday at 8:30 a.m., and all the teachers and their friends are invited. The fare is $1 a round trip. This is one-half the regular fare. Mr. Hartanft suggests that rubbers and a mackintosh will be necessary in going through the mines.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 21, 1925

When Portland, Oregon, recently held its Home Beautiful Exposition, Ralph C. Dean, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Portland Depot, lost no time in demonstrating to the citizens of the Columbia River metropolis that Diamond Briquets were the ideal fuel to make beautiful homes comfortable as well.

This picture shows the booth which was arranged by R.R. English, city salesman, and which carried the message of Diamond Briquets to many Portland homes. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 30, 1925

Josephine Corliss Preston

Josephine Corliss Preston

Following a three-day convention of the County School Superintendents of the state at Olympia, at which were present a number of prominent national and state educational leaders, the delegates have been invited to visit Carbonado Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Mrs. Josephine Corliss Preston, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Mrs. Clare Ketchum Tripp, Director of the Washington Industries Educational Bureau, have arranged for those attending the convention to visit a number of industrial plants in Tacoma on Thursday morning, April 30.

Immediately following lunch, the party will be conducted by auto to Carbonado, via South Prairie and Wilkeson. Details of the program will be found on the last page of the Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, August 1999

By Lynda Maks

My father, Joseph Dal Santo, was born in 1885 in Sehio, Italy, and came to the U.S. around 1911. My mother, Anna Respleux, was born in 1896, in Wilkeson, Washington. They met at a boarding house in Black Diamond, which was run by my mother’s aunt and uncle, Joe and Mary Favro. They were married in August of 1914.

They had 8 children: Jules was born in 1916 in BD, Angeline (1917) in Cle Elum, and Alice (1918) in BD, who passed away with the flu in 1919. They then moved to Renton where they had Lynda (1920), Leo (1922), John (1924), and Joe (1925). They moved back to Black Diamond in 1930 so my dad could work for Pacific Coast Coal Company—you had to live in Black Diamond and live in their houses to work for them. You all know the song, “You Owe Your Soul to the Company Store”—that’s the way it was. My brother Roy was born in 1931. (more…)

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