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Posts Tagged ‘Hobart’

Family recalls his career and life on the farm

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, June 2005

Story by Barbara Nilson
Photos by Sherrie Acker and Nilson

Warren Iverson greets Johnny Lazor’s children: Barbara Donckers, David Lazor, and Raymond Lazor at the dedication of the “Johnny Lazor Hobart Ball Field.” — Photo by Barbara Nilson

The Hobart ball field now bears the name “Johnny Lazor Hobart Ball Field.” A crowd of nearly 100 arrived on Saturday, May 14, to hear Warren Iverson recognize the people who were responsible for the restoration and renaming of the field.

A new flag pole was donated by Terry Seaman, a huge sign graces the back stop, and a plaque honoring Lazor’s baseball career has been placed on a stone at the entrance to the field.

On Sunday more than 150 people were on hand at the Hobart Community Church to hear the three Lazor children, David, Raymond, and Barbara, recall their Dad and life on the farm on SE 208th Street. (more…)

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By JoAnne Matsumura
Maple Valley Historical Society

The elders stated the “U” must mean a labor union and the “M” surely must mean miners, because it was a mining town and there were miners living all around.

It also could not be Maple Valley, because this June 18, 1915, UMHS commencement program was for Union M High School of Black Diamond, Washington and its four graduates. They were Charles Williams, Florence Harries, Ivy Davies, and Anna Davies.

It would not be until 1926, before Hobart, Maple Valley, and Taylor joined forces and qualified to be Union T High School, which then formed TAylor, HObart, and MAple Valley as Tahoma High School. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times Rotogravure, June 4, 1950

One trade that hasn’t changed much since the time of the Pharaohs is the making of hand-sewn gloves. Cutting them is a skill generally handed from father to son. W. Christofferson’s father made gloves in Gloversville, N.Y., and the son got his master cutter’s papers at the age of 17. Then he came West, led a life of adventure in the Army for some years, and finally settled on a piece of stump land several miles east of Maple Valley, where wild deer can come right up to his windows and watch him working with rare doe-skins brought from Africa. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Bugle, May 1997

By Carl Heflinger

Wood and Iverson Mill workers group portrait, Hobart, between 1915 and 1931.

Reading the article in the Maple Valley Bugle by George Sidebotham about the history of Hobart and vicinity reminded me of Henry Sidebotham. I worked with Henry at Wood & Iverson planer mill in 1928. The planer mill planed and finished lumber after it had been sawed into suitable dimensions and kiln dried.

My job was to off-bear the boards as they came out of the planer. I gave one board to Henry and the next board to Stanley Savage. Each of these men had a trim saw. They trimmed the boards and graded them, putting each piece on a table in piles according to their lengths. As I remember, there was only one grade and that was No. 1 clear. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 22, 1926

In a previous issue of the Bulletin there appeared a picture of Black Diamond’s first division soccer team. In recognition of the fine showing made during the last season by the camp’s second division team, known as the Black Diamond Briquets, we herewith present the picture of the booters whose record speaks for itself.

From left to right, front, Chas. Thompson, Art Fowler, Vic White, John Thompson, H. “Shorty” Ogden; second row, Joe Fowler, Vic Roberts, Chas. L. Gallagher; back row, H.J. Wingfield, linesman, Chas. Maroni, H.L. Berry, “Boots” Pierotti, and F.A. Strange. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 27, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The families of Hobart pioneers, Rudolph and Julie (Gradishnick) Grady and Olga (Grady) and Rudy Petchnick, will be featured at the Sunday, April 15th reunion at the Hobart Community Church, at 1:30 p.m. The program is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 20, 2007

The former railroad depot, built in 1886, in Black Diamond now houses the Historical Society Museum. Down Railroad Avenue the current book store is visible. It has also been King’s Tavern. — Photo by Barbara Nilson.

Featured speaker at the Maple Valley Reunion, Sunday, Feb. 25th, will be Mayor Howard Botts of Black Diamond. The 1 p.m. program at the Grange Hall on Highway 169 at 216th is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

Mayor Botts, who was born and raised in Black Diamond, will relate the histories of the two towns and how they have been connected over the years by the highway, the railroad, once upon a time, as well as other similarities. He’ll also discuss, “what is coming down the road; hopefully, new homes and new businesses.”

He said, “It is always interesting to talk about my home town.” Botts has served as mayor for 24 years and before that served several terms on the City Council in the 1960s and then during the 1970s, he was a member of the Planning Community. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Bugle, February 2000

Story and photos by Barb Nilson

William D. Gibbon descendants attend historical society program January 17: grandsons Gary and Ronald Gibbon; great-grandson Lance Gibbon, great-great grandson Noah, granddaughter Dorothy Church and great granddaughter Carol Church.

The pot belly stove was missing but the memories were warm as pioneers gathered in a circle January 17 to recall swapping gossip around the stove at the Gibbon/Mezzavilla store, buying penny candy, selling cascara bark, etc.

Six descendants of W.D. “Billy” Gibbon, including his three grandchildren, brought old-time photos, the actual glass jars that held the coveted penny candy, and a metal carrying box that held cookies.

Present were the offspring of Chester Gibbon, W.D.’s only child: two sons, Ronald of Seattle, and Gareth (Gary) of Edmonds; daughter, Dorothy Church, Renton, and her daughter Carol Church, Arlington; great grandson Lance Gibbon of Maple Valley and his son, Noah. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maple Valley Bugle, December 2015

By D’Ann Tedford

Built in 1891 on Renton-Maple Valley road, the restored W.D. Gibbon General Merchandise store and post office is now located on Witte Road. It is open to the public on the 1st Saturday of each month, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. See also http://www.maplevalleyhistorical.com.

Visiting history at Maple Valley Historical Society’s site on Witte Road, one sees the name “Gibbon” prominently displayed on the 124-year-old restored building, “W.D. Gibbon General Merchandise.” In its years, the store also served as Maple Valley’s post office and it held a barbershop, remnants of which are visible during tours.

Gibbon had studied to be an educator but acquired the store that had been built in 1891 on Renton-Maple Valley road. His wife Lizzie had attended Washington Territorial University (now U of W) and became the first school-teacher in Black Diamond, seven miles south of the general store. (more…)

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By JoAnne Matsumura

As we gather to remember our fallen military heroes who’ve kept us free, let’s also remember our “other veterans” who rest among them—those individuals who had a long service in their profession or occupation.

Many of our community’s veterans are close to home in the Maple Valley–Hobart Cemetery, created in the late 1870s on land donated by Mr. and Mrs. C.O. Russell. (more…)

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