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Posts Tagged ‘hoist’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 28, 1924

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

Briquet Plant data of interest to you

This plant was opened in 1914 and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that over one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

Camp welcomes you

Through Mrs. Julius Johnson, president Newcastle Circle of the Parent-Teacher Association, its membership numbering 51, joins with the entire camp and the company officials in welcoming the visiting P.T.A. members of King County today. We want you to see the mine and the camp of which we are so proud, and when you leave us, above all, we want you to remember your trip to Newcastle and that your return will be welcomed.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars.

First, will be seen the unloading hoppers through which the fresh coal will be flowing from the railroad cars. From here the coal goes to the top of the high timber structure known as the “Raw coal bunker.” Through this it is fed down by gravity and in the exact proportion required into the two steel box conveyors which run from this bunker into the steel building ahead, known as the “Dryer Building.”

Before leaving the raw coal bunker, by stepping up the first flight of steps may be seen the “measuring” conveyors which portion out the two grades of coal as the housewife measures the ingredients of a cake. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 10, 1924

Not all gangs which go underground at Black Diamond are bent upon breaking all known hoist records. Evidence of this is seen in the group above which one Sunday recently explored the depths of the mine, guided by Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse.

The party was arranged by Frank Bergman, mine storekeeper, who was also the photographer, which explains his absence from the group. Those in the picture are: J.E. Clarkin, Joe Malo, Mrs. J.E. Clarkin, Miss Margaret Malo, Al A. Bergman, Theo. Rouse, Miss Gilbert Malo, N S. Bergman, and Miss Theresa Malo. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 13, 1924

Quality first, whether it be Holstein dairy cattle or Black Diamond coal, is the policy pursued in Everett by C.O. Hilen, district sales manager for the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

Everett is the metropolis for the rich dairy country of Snohomish County, and in the attractive window display shown above, Mr. Hilen stresses very graphically the importance of quality. Though hardly distinguishable in the above halftone, the scene depicts a diminutive milker seated on a Diamond Briquet by the side of the life-like cow at the left. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 17, 1923

Toonerville trolley

Toonerville trolley

Guided by the accommodating hand of Supt. J.J. Jones, the editor of the Bulletin was conducted through Black Diamond Mine last Friday, May 11, and initiated into the mysteries of digging coal.

Down on the 12th Level, in Chute No. 1, on the South Side, J.D. Walton gave a demonstration of how a pick is used in digging, while up at the face in the gangway some of the boys were busy with a jack hammer, driving the gangway still further along the seam.

At the 11th Level Pete Kurth, cager, was found on the job, busy with the constant string of trips coming and going. Going on up to the 9th, the trip was made on the “Toonerville Trolley”—the auxiliary hoist between the 12th and 7th Levels used until the 12th Level is developed extensively enough to permit the switching of the main trip. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1888

A community where constables and officers of the law are not needed—Remarkable progress and substantial prosperity

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Probably the majority of the readers of the Post-Intelligencer have never inspected a coal mine or visited a town where coal mining was the exclusive industry. They have, therefore, necessarily but an imperfect knowledge of a large and very excellent class of the working population of this territory, and especially of King County.

A representative of this paper visited Franklin, in this county, a day or two ago and made some observations which may be of general interest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 18, 1923

charlie-gallagherCharley Gallagher, occupying the place of honor in the picture herewith, began his career with the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle when he was 13 years old. Charley was then an oiler, but through the years he mastered the intricacies of the machinery of the hoist room and today finds him operating the company’s big electric hoist at Black Diamond. (more…)

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