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Posts Tagged ‘hospital’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 1, 1926

Black Diamond has always maintained a reputation for turning out championship teams in baseball, but in the season which just closed, the camp held the distinction of honoring two soccer football teams, both of whom made splendid records.

In the group shown above are gathered the following players: Front row, left to right, “Chick” Thompson, Chas. “Red” Towers, A. Maroni, R. Durnac, John Ogden; second row, Chas. Maroni, Jas. Strang, Vic Roberts; back row, P.J. Gallagher, J.T. Hollow, and “Boots” Pierotti. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 29, 1911

Dynamiters try to kill family, wrecking home

Whole town aroused by loud detonation

Their lives the object of a vengeful attempt to blow them into eternity, Mrs. and Mrs. Rasmus Christiansen, of Black Diamond, early this morning escaped the death planned for them only because the five or more sticks of giant powder planted alongside their home by the unidentified assassin was beneath a section of the house far removed from that where they were sleeping.

Although the partitions of the house were blown out, and it was left an entire wreck, none of the Christiansens was hurt. Their escape was due to the fact they slept in a room that received the least of the shock, and that its force was broken by the springs and mattress of the bed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 25, 1926

When the inventor of the Jones system of lubrication for mine car wheels recently visited Burnett, Master Mechanic A.L. McBlaine was able to show him just how the system worked on the cars used in the haulage. This picture shows McBlaine pointing out the features of the Jones bearing to the inventor. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 18, 1926

Though the men who dig the coal seldom see it after it leaves the mine, they know that the product of their labor will go to warm the homes of many cities and towns. This picture shows one of the Ford delivery trucks of the Pacific Coast Coal Company from which is being delivered a load of Newcastle Lump. This truck is designed for quick and light deliveries and is able to haul its load anywhere that a car can be driven. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 11, 1926

Not only does the Black Diamond Band appeal to the ear with its melodies and martial airs, but the boys present a striking appearance in their natty new uniforms as well. This picture is published that those who heard the Black Diamond Band over the radio recently may know that they are an attractively garbed organization. Frank Carroll, director of the band, is a musician of years of experience and organizer of the famed Bellingham Elks’ Band. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 4, 1926

Editors and publishers of approximately 100 newspapers in the State of Washington were the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle and the Briquet Plant, last Saturday. This excursion was the closing feature of the Fourteenth Annual Newspaper Institute of the Washington Press Association.

The picture shows the group ready to board the special train after having made a trip into the Primrose Seam, a mile and a quarter into the heart of the mountain, from whence comes the famous Newcastle coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 25, 1926

Members of the Washington State Press Association, in their fourteenth Annual Institute in Seattle, are to be the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company on Saturday, February 27. They will visit Newcastle, where they will make a trip into Primrose Tunnel, after which they will inspect the Briquet Plant on their return to Seattle. The Pacific Coast Coal Company welcomes this opportunity to greet the representatives of the press.

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