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Posts Tagged ‘hospital’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 5, 1924

Getting the best results at the lowest cost from the proper burning of coal was the theme of the appeal made by the Washington Coal Producers’ Association in its exhibit at the recent Merchants’ Convention in Seattle. Using the slogan, “There’s a Washington Coal for Every Purpose,” the exhibit attracted wide attention.

Pacific Coast coals and Diamond Briquets occupied prominent positions in the exhibit. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 29, 1913

Joe Klansnik, of Black Diamond, and four-year-old child, receive serious injuries when car turns over

BLACK DIAMOND, Wash., Tuesday, July 29. – Three persons are in the hospital of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Black Diamond and two may die as the result of injuries sustained in an automobile accident Sunday afternoon on the road between here and Auburn. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, July 11, 1968

John Sherwood, 16-year-old Enumclaw youth, was pronounced dead on arrival at Community Memorial Hospital about 2:04 a.m. Tuesday after his father found him slumped over in the front seat of his car which was parked at the family residence, 1305 Davis Avenue.

According to the King County Coroner Leo Sowers, death was attributed to acute pulmonary congestion and cerebral edema. Laboratory tests are presently being run to determine the causes.

The report further stated that the youth was last seen by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Sherwood, about 9 p.m. Monday when he told them he was driving to a friend’s house.

About 1 a.m. Tuesday, Earl Sherwood was notified by neighbors that a disturbance was taking place in or around the boy’s car. The elder Sherwood investigated and found his son.

Funeral services for the youth are pending at the Enumclaw Funeral Home.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 8, 1934

Woodsmen and deputy sheriffs join in search; 5 aboard Spokane-Seattle craft escape uninjured

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Woodsmen, forest rangers, watershed patrolmen, and Seattle deputy sheriffs today searched through the rain-soaked undergrowth of the Snoqualmie National Forest, thirty miles southeast of Seattle, for Daisy A. Mooney of Winthrop, missing after a United Air Lines plane in which she was a passenger crashed six miles east of Selleck last evening.

She disappeared last evening after a United Air Lines planes, carrying her and five other passengers and a crew of three, crashed in the fog and rain on a mountainside of the high Cascades.

Four persons were injured in the smash, which might have been fatal had it not been for the quick thinking of the pilots and the sturdy construction of the Spokane-to-Seattle plane.

Co-pilot staggers out of wilds

First word of the mishap reached Seattle about 8 o’clock last night when Copilot Dwight Hansen of Spokane, badly injured, staggered out of the wilderness and obtained a rescue party at Selleck. Hansen was taken to Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle.

In addition to Hansen, who is suffering from a probable broken nose, shock, a deep wound in one leg, and many minor cuts and bruises, the injured include:

Pilot Ben Redfield, Spokane, compound fracture of the left arm.

Robert Clarke, Tacoma state liquor inspector, wrenched back.

Miss Helen Curren, cashier for the Great West Life Assurance Company in Seattle, leg injured but believed unbroken. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 30, 1924

One institution of which Burnett is justly proud is the company store, a picture of which is herewith shown. L.W. Foreman is the capable and accommodating manager of the store and with his efficient corps of helpers he is making it an institution of real service to the camp.

A prompt delivery service is maintained, which with the high quality of the merchandise carried, is another one of the reasons for the general appeal of the company store to all residents of Burnett. (more…)

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