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Posts Tagged ‘hospital’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 8, 1934

Woodsmen and deputy sheriffs join in search; 5 aboard Spokane-Seattle craft escape uninjured

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Miss Helen Curren, Seattle insurance firm cashier, upper left, suffered a leg injury when a United Air Lines planes, in which she was returning from a Wenatchee wedding, crashed in the fog east of Selleck yesterday. Upper right—Miss Marian Bennett, Spokane, plane stewardess, gave first aid to Miss Curran, Pilot Ben Redfield and Robert C. Clarke, Wenatchee passenger, also hurt. Lower—Copilot Dwight Hansen, photographed in Virginia Mason Hospital.—(Miss Curran’s photo by Hartsook.)

Woodsmen, forest rangers, watershed patrolmen, and Seattle deputy sheriffs today searched through the rain-soaked undergrowth of the Snoqualmie National Forest, thirty miles southeast of Seattle, for Daisy A. Mooney of Winthrop, missing after a United Air Lines plane in which she was a passenger crashed six miles east of Selleck last evening.

She disappeared last evening after a United Air Lines planes, carrying her and five other passengers and a crew of three, crashed in the fog and rain on a mountainside of the high Cascades.

Four persons were injured in the smash, which might have been fatal had it not been for the quick thinking of the pilots and the sturdy construction of the Spokane-to-Seattle plane.

Co-pilot staggers out of wilds

First word of the mishap reached Seattle about 8 o’clock last night when Copilot Dwight Hansen of Spokane, badly injured, staggered out of the wilderness and obtained a rescue party at Selleck. Hansen was taken to Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle.

In addition to Hansen, who is suffering from a probable broken nose, shock, a deep wound in one leg, and many minor cuts and bruises, the injured include:

Pilot Ben Redfield, Spokane, compound fracture of the left arm.

Robert Clarke, Tacoma state liquor inspector, wrenched back.

Miss Helen Curren, cashier for the Great West Life Assurance Company in Seattle, leg injured but believed unbroken. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 30, 1924

One institution of which Burnett is justly proud is the company store, a picture of which is herewith shown. L.W. Foreman is the capable and accommodating manager of the store and with his efficient corps of helpers he is making it an institution of real service to the camp.

A prompt delivery service is maintained, which with the high quality of the merchandise carried, is another one of the reasons for the general appeal of the company store to all residents of Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 8, 1924

Not a feminine foot faltered when the guides for this group of King County P.T.A. members led the way into the dark recesses of the Primrose Tunnel at Newcastle. These women, a portion of 300 who recently visited Newcastle Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, here saw firsthand the actual processes of coal mining.

The guides for this group were, Dan Carey, Jas. E. Ash, and Phillip Chase, all of the Engineering Department. John Eck, fireboss in charge of the operations at Primrose, is kneeling at the left. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 10, 1924

Not all gangs which go underground at Black Diamond are bent upon breaking all known hoist records. Evidence of this is seen in the group above which one Sunday recently explored the depths of the mine, guided by Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse.

The party was arranged by Frank Bergman, mine storekeeper, who was also the photographer, which explains his absence from the group. Those in the picture are: J.E. Clarkin, Joe Malo, Mrs. J.E. Clarkin, Miss Margaret Malo, Al A. Bergman, Theo. Rouse, Miss Gilbert Malo, N S. Bergman, and Miss Theresa Malo. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 3, 1924

Because of the steep pitch of the main slopes in some of the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company it is necessary to use covers on the cars in which the coal is hoisted to prevent it being scattered along the slope on the way to the tipple.

In the picture above is shown a new type of cover invented and patented by W.B. Walker of Newcastle. This cover is so designed that it telescopes along the side of the car when not in use. The picture shows the cover folded back and also covering the loaded coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 27, 1924

Burnett may be a long way from Glasgow, but you’d never know it when the Scotch of the camp start out to celebrate the birthday of the immortal bard, “Bobby Burns.” The picture reproduced above shows a quintet that helped make the welkin ring at the last celebration.

From left to right they are: Mrs. Thos. Taylor, Mrs. Fred Hobson, James Blair, Mrs. James Blair, and Mrs. Robt. Wallace. Two others, Mrs. H.A. Doddrell and Mrs. John Burt, also participated in the program but were unable to be in the picture. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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