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Posts Tagged ‘hotels’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, June 13, 1913

These buildings were located where the Green River Eagles #1490 is today.

Fire broke out in the Black Diamond Hotel last Friday morning at about 2 o’clock, said to be caused by a man’s carelessness in smoking in one of the rooms. The building and contents were entirely destroyed, and the flames spread to Pete Fredericksen’s meat market adjoining, and a nearby residence, both being consumed.

A small safe containing considerable money, a cash register, and some books were saved from the market. Some meat was also carried out, but much of it was stolen after being placed beyond the reach of the flames. The insurance on all the property was small and the loss consequently was considerable.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 26, 1923

On the front cover of the Pacific Coast Bulletin this week is reproduced a remarkable photograph of a man trip, just as it starts down the slope of Black Diamond Mine with a crew going on the graveyard shift. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 19, 1923

Photo by James & Merryhew

Photo by James & Merryhew

No mention of Black Diamond would be complete without reference to Mr. and Mrs. C.C. Christensen, whose likenesses are shown above.

“Dad” Christensen, as he is familiarly known, is the Justice of the Peace in Black Diamond and is generally regarded as the father of the camp. Under his paternal care every operation of the camp’s varied activities, from the distribution of the Bulletin to the distribution of the mine’s output, is constantly watched and safeguarded. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 5, 1923

burnett-firebossesAnyone having an idea that the firebosses and other supervisory officials at Burnett Mine are a bunch of lounge lizards and pink tea hounds with nothing to do but check in on the job and stick around until the whistle blows each day, should be on hand when the day shift comes off.

With the help of Supt. Bob Simpson, the Bulletin photographer last week rounded up the firebosses and foremen as they came off the day shift from underground, and the photograph shown above is proof positive that they’re a bunch of hard hitters. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 2, 1913

Lawless malcontents fire into company hotel and attempt to tear down stockade at open camp

Corporation employee gets bullet in foot

Bayne hotel

Bayne hotel

One non-union employee was shot, a rifle bullet shattering his foot, and an attempt was made to tear down the stockade gate and fence at the open-shop Bayne mine of the Carbon Coal & Clay Company, forty miles southeast of Seattle, last night.

It was the climax to a day of demonstration during which more than 1,000 members of the United Mine Workers of America had assembled outside the stockade to register a protest against the non-union status of the employees on the other side of the fence. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 29, 1923

Mouth of the drift entrance to the Superior Mine located west of Issaquah near Tibbetts Creek, circa 1911-1912. The mine properties were subsequently purchased by Pacific Coast Coal Co.

Mouth of the drift entrance to the Superior Mine located west of Issaquah near Tibbetts Creek, circa 1911-1912. The mine properties were subsequently purchased by Pacific Coast Coal Co.

Before a special meeting of the Mine Council at Issaquah Wednesday, March 21, announcement was made of the company’s decision to temporarily suspend operations at Issaquah Mine. Plans were also outlined for the keeping intact of the Issaquah organization, so that when the mine reopens later in the summer, practically the entire crew may be available.

Following the council session, the council adjourned to the lobby of the hotel where all employees had been invited to an open meeting, and there the situation was explained to the camp as a whole. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 29, 1923

coal-dealersComing from Medford, Oregon, on the south and from the Canadian line on the north and from Spokane and the towns of the Big Bend and Palouse country to the east, some 150 coal dealers of Oregon and Washington, gathered in Seattle as guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company last Thursday, visiting the mines at Newcastle, Black Diamond, and Burnett and the Briquet Plant as well. (more…)

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