Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘hotels’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 4, 1923

Indication of the wide-spreading use of Diamond Briquets is seen in the growing demand for this fuel for consumption in the smudge pots of Yakima Valley orchards. Each spring, during the budding and blossoming season, Yakima orchardists strive to save their crops from the ravages of late frosts by the use of smudge pots placed beneath the flower-laden trees. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 20, 1923

Several months ago a considerable shipment of Black Diamond coal was dispatched to points in Alaska and even to scattered government stations up beyond the Arctic Circle. Now the other extreme is reached, with three whalers in this week for bunkers to take them to the Antarctic.

Each of the whalers goes by the name of Star, being also numbered 1, 2, and 3. They loaded Black Diamond and South Prairie steam coal, and will sail from Seattle, via Honolulu and Australia, for the South Polar regions. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 23, 1923

Three teams, representing Newcastle, Burnett, and Black Diamond, respectively, contested for honors at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet held in Newcastle last Saturday, August 18.

Above, the personnel of all three teams is shown, just prior to beginning the first aid problems. Below, the victorious Black Diamond team and the Du Pont and William M. Barnum cups which they won. Black Diamond’s score in the first aid events was 96.4, and in the mine rescue events, 95, making a combined score of 95.7.

Members of the winning team are: Edw. Hale, D.D. Jones, Capt. B.F. Snook, A.G. Wallace, Jack Nichols and Richard Evered. They leave for Salt Lake City, Friday at 3:30 p.m., to compete in the International First Aid Meet on August 26, 27, and 28. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 22, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930, now serves as the Pacific States Condominiums. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

At the end the Kent-Kangley Road east of Maple Valley is the mill town of Selleck, which still exists today; next door was the town of Lavender, or “Jap Town.” The mill is gone, but the school is still there and about 16 of the original houses. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 16, 1923

Holiday declared and mine will close for day

All roads lead to Newcastle next Saturday, August 15, where on that occasion the first aid and mine rescue teams of Black Diamond, Burnett, and Newcastle will contest for honors, the wining team to have the privilege of representing the Pacific Coast Coal Company at the International First Aid Meet in Salt Lake City on August 26, 27, and 28.

To give everyone an opportunity to take part in the festivities in connection with the meet, the company has declared the day a holiday, and the mines, company stores, and other activities will be closed all day. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 3, 1913

iwwMembers of the United Mine Workers of America, having unionized practically all the collieries in this state, may have to clash with the I.W.W. [Industrial Workers of the World] to retain control of the west side camps.

According to mine employees and operators the I.W.W. is attempting to force its way into the mining camps, but thus far has made no marked headway. The union officials believe that the I.W.W. will be no more popular in the mining camps than it has been among loggers, and during the past year I.W.W. organizers have been chased out of the logging camps by the men themselves. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »