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Posts Tagged ‘hotels’

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 29, 1923

These men are not singing the old nursery rhyme of “Rub-a-dub-dub, three men in a tub,” even though the picture does call to mind the childhood jingle. They are eight full-sized he-men with safety lamps, full lunch buckets, and skilled hands, aboard a man trip ready to start down the slope to the lower levels of Black Diamond Mine for an eight-hour shift.

Among those in the car recognized by the Bulletin photographer were: Frank Eddy, George Hoadley, Joe Marquis, Serge Head, and Robt. Ogden. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 22, 1923

One week from today, Thanksgiving Day, there is promised a royal feed at each of the camps when the dinner gong sounds at the hotels.

In common with all Americans the custom of dining on the toothsome turkey will hold full sway. Judging from the array of savory viands listed on the Thanksgiving menu there is going to be plenty to go round with a second helping for everybody.

At Newcastle plans are already well under way by Chef Geo. W. Blake and his corps of able assistants, and when the big day arrives there is certain to be a crowd of hungry diners ready to start the chorus of “Please pass the turkey.”

Chef Emil Bernhard at Burnett believes not only in preparing a feast for the inner man but he invariably accompanies it with a feast of beauty for the eye, and his tables promise to be groaning with the weight of good things.

At Black Diamond the hotel diners are anxiously awaiting the spread which Chef J.P. Whelan has in store, which all agree will be complete from soup to nuts. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 4, 1923

Indication of the wide-spreading use of Diamond Briquets is seen in the growing demand for this fuel for consumption in the smudge pots of Yakima Valley orchards. Each spring, during the budding and blossoming season, Yakima orchardists strive to save their crops from the ravages of late frosts by the use of smudge pots placed beneath the flower-laden trees. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 20, 1923

Several months ago a considerable shipment of Black Diamond coal was dispatched to points in Alaska and even to scattered government stations up beyond the Arctic Circle. Now the other extreme is reached, with three whalers in this week for bunkers to take them to the Antarctic.

Each of the whalers goes by the name of Star, being also numbered 1, 2, and 3. They loaded Black Diamond and South Prairie steam coal, and will sail from Seattle, via Honolulu and Australia, for the South Polar regions. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 23, 1923

Three teams, representing Newcastle, Burnett, and Black Diamond, respectively, contested for honors at the Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet held in Newcastle last Saturday, August 18.

Above, the personnel of all three teams is shown, just prior to beginning the first aid problems. Below, the victorious Black Diamond team and the Du Pont and William M. Barnum cups which they won. Black Diamond’s score in the first aid events was 96.4, and in the mine rescue events, 95, making a combined score of 95.7.

Members of the winning team are: Edw. Hale, D.D. Jones, Capt. B.F. Snook, A.G. Wallace, Jack Nichols and Richard Evered. They leave for Salt Lake City, Friday at 3:30 p.m., to compete in the International First Aid Meet on August 26, 27, and 28. (more…)

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