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Posts Tagged ‘hotels’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 4, 1924

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Hospitality in unbounded measure is the welcome which will be extended all who participate in the Fourth of July celebration at Black Diamond. Particular emphasis is being laid upon the fact that the children are to be given first attention, free ice cream and refreshments having been provided for every child. (more…)

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Respect for the flag is one of the first marks of patriotism. The man who can talk the loudest about the duties of citizenship often forgets to uncover when the flag goes marching by, or sits with a bored expression on his face when the national anthem is played. It is not for the flag itself, but rather for what it stands, that every true American owes due homage and respect to its starry folds.

Salute the flag! Stand at attention to the strains of The Star Spangled Banner! For thus is patriotism fostered in the youth of our land and respect for law and order maintained. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 6, 1913

Ten thousand dollars’ worth of damage resulted from fire in mining town

These buildings were located where the Green River Eagles #1490 is today.

BLACK DIAMOND, Wash., Saturday, June 6—Fire early this morning completely destroyed the Black Diamond Hotel and annex and the Gibbon Hotel, all owned by Frank W. Bishop, the Black Diamond meat market owned by Pete Fredericksen, and the Bowen residence owned by J.H. Bowen. Damage resulted to the post office building owned by Charles McKinnon and the ice cream parlor owned by John E. Davies. The loss is approximately $10,000.

The fire started about 1 o’clock and in less than ten minutes after the fire whistle commenced to blow every man and woman in the little village turned out to fight the flames. After three hours of fierce fighting all danger was past.

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 23, 1924

School days for this year are almost over, which may account for the happy expressions in the above group. At the same time, the photographer intercepted these Newcastle youngsters on the way home after a day in the school room, and perhaps they’re thinking of a cookie jar or something good to eat out of mother’s kitchen when they get home.

The Bulletin photographer was able to identify the following in the order named: George Dunbar, Helen Bergin, Harry Berg, Muriel Morgan, Mary Jones, Verna Howson, George Clay, and Billy Dunbar. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, May 18, 1880

One of the most convincing proofs of the steady growth and prosperity of our territory is to be found in the development and increased capacity of our coal mines. And, for an example we will take one, near at hand—the Newcastle mine—situated near Lake Washington, in the central portion of our county to demonstrate this proposition. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 8, 1924

Not a feminine foot faltered when the guides for this group of King County P.T.A. members led the way into the dark recesses of the Primrose Tunnel at Newcastle. These women, a portion of 300 who recently visited Newcastle Mine as the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company, here saw firsthand the actual processes of coal mining.

The guides for this group were, Dan Carey, Jas. E. Ash, and Phillip Chase, all of the Engineering Department. John Eck, fireboss in charge of the operations at Primrose, is kneeling at the left. (more…)

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