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Posts Tagged ‘hotels’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 19, 1925

Tramways and aerial cables are common sights around metal mines, but it’s uncommon to find a coal mine with its entrance 450 feet below the level of the surrounding country. The above view shows the “incline” at Carbonado, a 35-degree pitch, down which all supplies and the daily shifts are lowered and raised.

Carbonado Comments

Carbonado victor in soccer battle

Battling the valiant Newcastle soccer eleven, the Carbonado squad last Sunday put up such a fight that the score ended 4 to 0, with the Carbon lads on the long end. Carbonado played a fast game.

Newcastle put up a fair defense, but with a number of new men, and also handicapped by a recent period of idleness, the Coal Creek team could make little headway against the strong Carbon defense. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 12, 1925

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

Feb. 12, 1809—Apr. 15, 1865

One hundred sixteen years ago the Great Emancipator was born amid humbler surroundings than is the birthright of most Americans today. Yet his memory is hallowed year by year by millions, and the example of his noble ideals is set before every schoolchild; an inspiration to the attainment of the loftiest pinnacle of success, no matter how lowly the start. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, February 5, 1925

Every concern is on the lookout for good men and that is why you seldom hear a good man complaining about not getting enough salary. When the firm he is with fails to pay him all his services are worth someone else is going to come along and do it. — Coleman Cox. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 1, 1925

Few towns in the country can boast as fine a general merchandise store as the new company institution in Burnett. Spacious and modern in every respect, the new store, under the direction of Manager L.W. Foreman is proving its worth to the community, and in turn the citizens of the camp are demonstrating their appreciation of the service by a constantly increasing patronage.

The Burnett store was opened in the new location early in November. Its well displayed stock, attractive windows, and showcases, must be seen to be appreciated. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 19, 1924

Olaf Bodding, of the Bodding Transfer Co., Juneau, Alaska, is here seen with his team, ready to deliver a ton of Black Diamond screened coal, sacked, to a customer who lives half way up the mountain. That the problem of delivering coal in Juneau, especially half way up the mountain, is somewhat different than might be supposed, is seen in the fact that to deliver this ton of coal the cost to the customer for delivery alone is $6, to say nothing of the cost of the coal itself.

Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets are both popular fuels in Juneau, according to H.G. Walmsley, agent for the Pacific Coast Coal Company there. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 5, 1924

This is the portal marking the main entrance to the coal mining camp of Carbonado, recently acquired by the Pacific Coast Coal Company. The camp is beautifully situated on the Carbon River, just off the main road to the Carbon Glacier on the north slope of majestic Mt. Rainier. Carbonado is approximately 50 miles from Seattle, on the Northern Pacific Railway, the tracks of which appear in the foreground. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1924

Though this is Black Diamond’s first soccer team, the boys are attracting considerable attention in the Washington State Football Association this season. Next Sunday they meet the Newcastle eleven on the latter’s field in the elimination playoff for the state cup. (more…)

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