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Posts Tagged ‘Howard Hanson Dam’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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A ritzy development cuts a deal to take water from Puget Sound cities and endangered salmon

Originally published in Seattle Weekly, March 5, 1998

By Chris Carrel

The DOE insists taking more of the Green River’s scarce water for a golf course won’t hurt its struggling salmon.

The endangered-species listing proposed last week for Puget Sound chinook salmon served official notice that Pugetopolis’ sprawl-as-usual is incompatible with healthy salmon runs. In response, legislators pledged serious salmon-recovery legislation for next session.

A proposal in the current session to divert water from salmon streams to luxury homes in southeast King County has highlighted the difficult politics of balancing development with salmon. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 3, 1959

HANSON DAMSITE: At Eagle Gorge, on the Green River, 30 miles southeast of Seattle, work started today on the long-planned Howard A. Hanson Dam. The broken line indicates where the crest of the dam will cross the narrow valley, creating a lake eight miles long and impounding 106,000 acre-feet of flood waters. Poring over maps indicating the area to be covered in excavation and subsequent construction were, from left, James J. Grafton, resident engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, and two surveyors, Louis Zumek for the Army Engineers and Andrew McDermott for the Henry J. Kaiser Co. and Raymond International, joint contractors.

HANSON DAMSITE: At Eagle Gorge, on the Green River, 30 miles southeast of Seattle, work started today on the long-planned Howard A. Hanson Dam. The broken line indicates where the crest of the dam will cross the narrow valley, creating a lake eight miles long and impounding 106,000 acre-feet of flood waters. Poring over maps indicating the area to be covered in excavation and subsequent construction were, from left, James J. Grafton, resident engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, and two surveyors, Louis Zumek for the Army Engineers and Andrew McDermott for the Henry J. Kaiser Co. and Raymond International, joint contractors.

The final step in a long-deferred flood-control project, construction of the Howard A. Hanson Dam on Green River, got under way today.

Dean H. Eastman, president of the Seattle Chamber of Commerce and vice president of the Northern Pacific Railway Co., threw a switch setting off a blast of dynamite. L. Costello, member of a civic committee organized by the late Mr. Hanson to urge dam construction, moved the first shovelful of earth. (more…)

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Text and photos from the Howard A. Hanson Dam dedication program, May 12, 1962

Eagle Gorge Dam was renamed Howard A. Hanson by an act of Congress 28 July 1958, introduced by Congressman Thomas M. Pelly, and signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower 6 August 1958.

Many people worked long and hard to establish a flood-control project on the Green River in King County of Western Washington. One of these was Howard A. Hanson.

In addition to his many prior years of personal effort, he was, from 1947 until his death on 4 November 1957, a leader of civic and government groups actively seeking construction of the project. He organized and directed effective action leading to contributions by the state and King County totaling $2,000.000. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS Bulletin, Summer 2015

By William Kombol

Cover photo of Franklin Hot Springs by R. Curnow, circa 1984 cropped from the cover page of “Everyone’s Guide to Hot Springs of Western Washington: A complete guide to over 250 Hot Springs and Soda Pop Springs” by Jesse W. Love, copyright 1985 by Jesse W. Love, published by Kaleidoscope Publications, Inc. Bellevue, WA 98005.

Cover photo of Franklin Hot Springs by R. Curnow, circa 1984, cropped from the cover page of “Everyone’s Guide to Hot Springs of Western Washington: A complete guide to over 250 Hot Springs and Soda Pop Springs,” by Jesse W. Love, copyright 1985 by Jesse W. Love, published by Kaleidoscope Publications, Inc. Bellevue, WA 98005.

The Franklin #12 underground coal mine began operations in the mid-1950s. It operated on the Franklin No. 12 coal seam, sometimes known as the Fulton seam. There are seventeen coal seams in the Franklin series, the most famous of which was the No. 14, better known as the McKay. Another heavily mined seam was the No. 14 known as the Gem.

Most of the mining at Franklin was done on the Black Diamond west side of the Green River. However, the eastern extension of the Franklin #12 mine was accessed from a log bridge across the Green River then driven southeast all the way under the Enumclaw-Franklin Road, a total of about 4,000 feet. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 19, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times South bureau

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

In 1964, people were still waiting for the train in Lester. Now Burlington Northern wants to get rid of the old railroad station deep in the Cascade Mountains.

Ever had a hankering to own a railroad station? This might be the time to pick one up cheap.

But there’s a slight catch. You’d have to move the two-story building from Lester, the isolated town southwest of Stampede Pass, deep in the Cascade Mountains.

The Lester train depot has got to go. That’s the word from its owner, Burlington Northern.

BN wants to demolish it, sell it or possibly give it away, according to Mike Cook, BN environmental engineer. In any case, the company wants the building off the railroad right-of-way, Cook told members of the King County Landmarks Commission last week. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe News, July 4, 1976

Story by Bill Smull
Photos by Smull, Larry Abele

Arrow-straight Burlington Northern rails streak toward Stampede Pass tunnel.

Arrow-straight Burlington Northern rails streak toward Stampede Pass tunnel.

Call it Palmer if you like—the post office has that name on its sign, and everyone will know that you’re most likely talking about the informal collection of buildings nestled between the north bank of the Green River and the Burlington Northern sidings. (more…)

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