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Posts Tagged ‘hunting’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 19, 1925

Shortly before the tunnel work was completed in the New Black Diamond Mine last month, Manager of Mines D.C. Botting arranged for the mine superintendents and supervisors from each of the camps to inspect the property.

In addition to going over the New Black Diamond property the party also visited the Briquet Plant, where the process of manufacturing Diamond Briquets was witnessed first hand. The picture shows the group on the trestle leading from the mine entrance to the tipple and bunkers under construction. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 22, 1924

Rendering everything from classic selections and overtures to modern waltzes and jazz numbers, the Newcastle Band provided a musical program of exceptional excellence at the Western Washington Mine Rescue and First Aid Meet in Carbonado.

Under the able direction of Bandmaster Archie Johnson the Newcastle Band is much in demand at all social events in the camp. This picture shows the band playing on the field at Carbonado. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 13, 1923

Constant reference to the Newcastle “Spirit” has made that camp famous among the mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

But while other camps may lay claim to equal or superior reasons for fame, Newcastle boasts one asset which no other camp has as yet put forth.

It is the five generation family shown [to the right].

Reading from left to right, seated: Mrs. M.A. Hayes, great-great-grandmother, and next to her, Mrs. S.F. Curnutt, great-grandmother.

Standing at the left is Mrs. Ula Hyatt, grandmother, and at her side, Mrs. H.W. Rounds, mother, with her daughter, Ellen. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS newsletter, The Bugle, October 1991

(Some of the old-timers of Maple Valley have been asked to write down recollections of earlier days. Most of what I recall is family history and there are times I cannot trust my memory. Also, much of it reflects a child’s point of view. Even my sister Ruth and I have entirely different recollections.)Inez (Williams) Merritt

1927 Tahoma High School. Inez Williams is in the second row, fourteenth from the left. (Courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society.)

1927 Tahoma High School. Inez Williams is in the second row, fourteenth from the left. (Courtesy Maple Valley Historical Society.)

My father, Roger Williams, became disabled in the summer of 1925 with what was diagnosed as inflammatory rheumatism. He was staying with relatives in Renton and mother had to cope with running the farm and an infant daughter born April 8th (Ruth).

Jean was 15 years old and I was 10 years old. We were able to do the everyday chores but the haying was beyond our capabilities.

One warm day in July, a parade of teams (horses) and wagons of all sizes and description came through the front gate and up to the barn.

These were neighbors who cheerfully gave up a day’s work on their own farms to give us a hand. There was even a team of mules among the others. It is the hardest job anyone would want to do and the hot, dry days of summer make it even worse. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 16 and 23, 1977

By Jalo Lahtinen

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the East Fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

Self-styled stump jumper Jalo Lahtinen of Hobart, standing here along the modern version of the east fork of Issaquah Creek, reminisces about Hobart 59 years ago in the following article and offers some reflections on the present as well as sage advice for the future. He calls his piece, “Musings of a not-to-smart stump rancher,” but we’ll leave it to the reader as to whether or not this should be taken literally. — Ed. (Photo by Bob Gerbing.)

When you tell someone you’re from Hobart, “Where is Hobart?” they ask.

It is at the headwaters of Issaquah Creek, the two forks known to us old stump jumpers by the following names—north fork as Holder’s Creek, east fork as Carry’s Creek.

It’s part of Cedar River Valley, nestled in the foothills of the Cascades with an eastern view of the Stampede Pass area and Mount Rainier to the south.

Once a sawmill town and farming area with self-sustaining farms and part-time stump farmers it was a paradise, a boy’s dream. Our mountains—Tiger, Taylor, and Sherwood were covered with the forest primeval, a cathedral of the Gods, an emerald jewel that God dropped in the right location, only a three-to-four mile area.

Near the summit of Sherwood is a beautiful spring two to three feet across, a trickle of the most beautiful blue water you could lay your eyes on running out of it—cold, refreshing, and thirst quenching.

Our streams were full of spawning salmon and land-locked sockeye in the fall, spawning by the hundreds. We called them red fish, cut-throat, and steelhead—no trick to catch a mess at any time. (more…)

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