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Posts Tagged ‘Indian Mine’

Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 24, 1924

Recently officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and representatives of Yakima Valley fruit growers conducted tests to determine the effectiveness of preventing damage to blossoming trees by the installation of Diamond Briquet burners in the orchards. The result was most satisfactory.

At the right in the above cut is shown an orchard scene with a briquet burner in the foreground. To the lower left is a truck load of Diamond Briquets being delivered in the orchard. The man in the driver’s seat is T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department. In the oval, from left to right, is N.D. Moore, vice-president Pacific Coast Coal Co.; Arthur Karr, Yakima Valley orchardist and inventor of the briquet burner; A.F. Marion, chief engineer Pacific Coast Coal Co.; T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department, and Bruce Dower of the John Dower Lumber Co., Yakima dealer for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. (more…)

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Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 10, 1924

Not all gangs which go underground at Black Diamond are bent upon breaking all known hoist records. Evidence of this is seen in the group above which one Sunday recently explored the depths of the mine, guided by Mine Foreman Theo. Rouse.

The party was arranged by Frank Bergman, mine storekeeper, who was also the photographer, which explains his absence from the group. Those in the picture are: J.E. Clarkin, Joe Malo, Mrs. J.E. Clarkin, Miss Margaret Malo, Al A. Bergman, Theo. Rouse, Miss Gilbert Malo, N S. Bergman, and Miss Theresa Malo. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, November 29, 1978

Building, center left, is part of the remains of the New Black Diamond Mine. It is now part of the King County Maintenance Shops.

Building, center left, is part of the remains of the New Black Diamond Mine. It is now part of the King County Maintenance Shops.

Holidays seem to bring visitors, and visitors to our area frequently have questions. There are often questions about coal and its history here.

There are many “old-timers” who can share their experiences but they are not always available when “Cousin Harry” asks, “Where were the coal mines?” or “How much coal did they get?”

The pictures on this page will help tell the story of one of the mines in the area. The New Black Diamond Mine was located between Maple Valley and Renton on what is now Highway 169. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Northwest Post Card Club newsletter; July, August, September 2017

By Ken Jensen

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

Black Diamond depot, circa 1910. The train was pulled by engine No. 18 of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, which served several mining towns in King County.

For the miners and their families in turn-of-the-century Black Diamond—an isolated company town near the Cascade foothills of South King County, Washington—the 33-mile trip to Seattle was an all-day journey. The company’s railroad and circa 1885 depot, along with its general store, were the townspeople’s only real connection to the outside world.

In 1904 the Pacific Coast Co. owned all of Black Diamond—its mines, its land, its stores, pretty much everything—as well as neighboring Franklin and a handful of other King and Pierce county towns. (more…)

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