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Posts Tagged ‘Indian Mine’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 17, 1935

The Pacific Coast Coal Co.’s New Black Diamond Mine (aka, Indian Mine), which was located on the Maple Valley Highway, is shown here being dismantled in 1941.

Two hundred pounds of dynamite, 1,000 blasting caps, and 100 feet of fuse were stolen last night by two masked robbers who held up and bound Archie McDonald, night watchman at the New Black Diamond mine, six miles east of Renton, after threatening McDonald’s life.

O.K. Bodia, chief criminal deputy sheriff, began an intensive search for the robbers, fearing the dynamite may be made into bombs or used to blast safes.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 6, 1927

Auburn party visits New Black Diamond Mine

Learn fine points of underground work at new property of Pacific Coast Coal Company

By Ellis Coe

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

Scenes at the New Black Diamond mine of the Pacific Coast Coal Company visited last week by a Seattle Times-Auburn party. The car was supplied by Rowland & Clark, Auburn distributor here. 1—Mine motor and cars at entrance to the main tunnel. 2—Theodore Rouse, mine foreman, employed by Pacific Coast Coal Company for twenty-five years. 3—Partially completed warehouse, shops, power house, and office. 4—The Auburn on the highway leading to New Black Diamond. Andy Emerson is at the wheel. 5—Ben Jones (left) and his brother Tom, who discovered the coal deposits in 1919. 6—View along Cedar River. The Auburn in which the trip was made is in the foreground.

To a novice in the coal mining business, who has never been further underground than the depth of his neighbor’s cellar, a trip of more than one mile into the heart of a mountain of coal is somewhat of an experience. Further than that, when blasting operations begin while this same novice is underground, it heightens the interest in the experience. The question as to whether the stay in the heart of the mountain will be permanent immediately enters the mind of the quasi coal digger, with the odds in favor of permanency. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 13, 1924

With the formal opening last Saturday of the new club house at Black Diamond, each of the three camps was able to boast of this long desired addition to the social facilities of the community. Newcastle’s club was the first to be completed, followed by the Burnett club and lastly the Black Diamond club. The building shown at the top of the picture is the Black Diamond club and that below is Burnett. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 24, 1924

Recently officials of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and representatives of Yakima Valley fruit growers conducted tests to determine the effectiveness of preventing damage to blossoming trees by the installation of Diamond Briquet burners in the orchards. The result was most satisfactory.

At the right in the above cut is shown an orchard scene with a briquet burner in the foreground. To the lower left is a truck load of Diamond Briquets being delivered in the orchard. The man in the driver’s seat is T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department. In the oval, from left to right, is N.D. Moore, vice-president Pacific Coast Coal Co.; Arthur Karr, Yakima Valley orchardist and inventor of the briquet burner; A.F. Marion, chief engineer Pacific Coast Coal Co.; T.M. Reeder of the Sales Department, and Bruce Dower of the John Dower Lumber Co., Yakima dealer for the Pacific Coast Coal Co. (more…)

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