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Posts Tagged ‘Issaquah’

Originally published in the Puget Sound Electric Journal, Month unknown, 1919

By L.R. Grant

Coal Creek Mine bunkers, washers, etc.

What will eventually be one of our most important coal mine contracts was recently signed with the Pacific Coast Coal Company. It provides for all electrical power requirements of the briquetting and coal-crushing plants at Briquetville, near Renton, the mine at Coal Creek, near Newcastle, and the mine at Issaquah. The new contract will supersede the old contract at the briquet plant at once, and later on our existing contract at Issaquah. The rate is our regular rate for coal mines, Schedule C-15, Tariff No. 10.

The briquet plant and the mine at Issaquah have previously been described in the Journal. Coal Creek Mine is about five miles northeast of our Renton substation in a direct line, and about three miles east of Lake Washington, on a branch of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railway. The town of Newcastle, where most of the miners live, is less than a mile northwest of the mine. This coal field was one of the first to be developed in the State of Washington and has been worked almost continuously since its first opening. (more…)

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Originally published in Seattle Daily Times, May 20, 1919

Delegates from the various mining camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company met recently in Black Diamond and formed an athletic and first aid association which promises to become a factor in the community.

The object of the association is to promote clean sport, build and equip clubhouses at the various camps, and to revive interest in healthful outdoor exercise. Two contests will be held in the near future, with prizes offered. The camps represented include Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, Burnett, Franklin, and the Seattle shops.

The following officers were selected to act as an advisory board: Ernest Newsham, honorary president; Stephen H. Green, honorary vice president; N.H. Freeman, president; Frank Rice, vice president; Dr. Mallory, treasurer; G.F. Clancy, secretary; one delegate from each camp.

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 7, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Of all the “lost” towns of King County the mostly thoroughly obliterated probably is Taylor, seven miles east of Maple Valley.

Taylor, once with a population close to 700 persons, was swallowed by the Cedar River watershed. Today a young forest is springing from its streets and gardens, and the sites of the coal bunkers and kilns of its once-prosperous clay industry.

Taylor ceased to exist in 1947. Two years earlier, the Seattle Water Department had obtained a condemnation judgment permitting it to include the town in the watershed. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, February 25, 1923

Medical, military, and industrial units show efficiency in operation

Thrilling rescues and efficient first aid work were demonstrated at The Armory last night, with the Washington National Guard and the King County Medical Society as hosts. 1—Boy Scouts show how to make a stretcher. Left to right, Glen Peterson, Troop 40; Carrol Philips, Troop 41; William Bliss, Troop 40 (on stretcher); Earl Deaner, Troop 40. 2—Maj. George W. Becler examining a trophy. 3—CoIumbus Hospital team, left to right. Miss E. Cassinat. Dr. William C. Speidel, Miss E. Hoover, Mrs. H.H. Ross, Miss K. Bates, Miss P. Campbell. 4—Lieut. Col. Harry Vanderbilt Wurdemann, chief umpire. 5—Lieut. Joseph Salvage, Seattle Fire Department, thinks life-saving is entertaining. The victim is Fireman T. Harden.

Thrilling rescues and efficient first aid work were demonstrated at The Armory last night, with the Washington National Guard and the King County Medical Society as hosts. 1—Boy Scouts show how to make a stretcher. Left to right, Glen Peterson, Troop 40; Carrol Philips, Troop 41; William Bliss, Troop 40 (on stretcher); Earl Deaner, Troop 40. 2—Maj. George W. Beeler examining a trophy. 3—Columbus Hospital team, left to right. Miss E. Cassinat. Dr. William C. Speidel, Miss E. Hoover, Mrs. H.H. Ross, Miss K. Bates, Miss P. Campbell. 4—Lieut. Col. Harry Vanderbilt Wurdemann, chief umpire. 5—Lieut. Joseph Salvage, Seattle Fire Department, thinks life-saving is entertaining. The victim is Fireman T. Harden.

Helmets, miners’ lamps, campaign hats, and nurses’ caps bobbed about in the Armory last night when an interesting exhibit of rescue work and first aid was staged by teams representing medical, military, and industrial organizations. The affair was arranged jointly by the King County Medical Society and the Washington National Guard. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2007

Collected by Barbara Nilson

Christmas lists for Santa were very different 70-80 years ago. They were more wish list that never came because the Depression was rampant and an orange in one’s stocking was a wonderful, glorious discovery on Christmas morn.

The Christmas that June (Corkins) Kuhuski most remembered was in 1930. She was 10 years old and scanned the Sears Wish book and found this wonderful “Patty” doll. She said she knew it would be her last doll because she was getting older. She showed the picture to her mother who responded, “That is too expensive, better pick another one.”It was all of $2.00.

So June picked a less expensive one but really had her heart set on “Patty.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 21, 1924

Thanksgiving Day is distinctly American. If those who established this institution had not been truly grateful to Divine Providence for the meager store of provisions wrung from a barren shore and hostile land, would we today who dwell in abundance have cause to render homage to the Pilgrim’s God?

It is for us, then, not to raise our voices in paeans of praise for the lavish blessings in which we revel today, but rather, to be humbly grateful for the heritage of Thanksgiving. Thus the nation today can sing its grateful praise to Him who guided the footsteps of that freedom-loving band who bequeathed to us America! (more…)

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