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Posts Tagged ‘Issaquah’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 21, 1923

Just to indicate where some of the coal goes which the mines at Black Diamond, Newcastle, and Burnett are constantly producing, the Bulletin this week presents a few scenes recently taken at the coal bunkers of the Pacific Coast Coal Company.

In the upper corner to the left is shown long rows of sacked Black Diamond lump, waiting to be loaded on the naval vessel, Gold Star, the steamer to the right in the oval just below. This coal, 36,378 sacks, was shipped to various Government schools and radio stations in Alaska. The center view shows the ship’s sling loading coal into the hold. On the right, upper view, is another scene showing the sacked coal ready for shipment, while below is the steamer Birmingham City taking steam coal for her own boilers. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 14, 1923

If working a shift in Black Diamond Mine was no harder for the four men shown above than it was for them to pose for this picture, there would always be a mad scramble among the men to see who could get the first man-trip down.

At the left we introduce to you, George Belt, and next to him, Fred Cunningham, a former Issaquah miner. The man next in line is R.E. “Curly” Campbell and the young Hercules at the extreme right is Darwin Walton. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 7, 1923

In keeping with the Bulletin’s policy of acquainting its readers with all phases of the company’s activities, we take pleasure this week in introducing the efficient force of the Everett agency of the Pacific Coast Coal Company. Here, as in Wenatchee, Portland, Tacoma, and Juneau, the agency force is constantly exerting every effort to increase the sales of briquets and Black Diamond, South Prairie, Newcastle, and Issaquah coals.

The picture shown above was taken on the occasion of a banquet on Saturday, May 26, at which Manager Charles O. Hilen presided. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 4, 1975

(This is the third in a series of articles on historical personages written by students in Mrs. Vicci Beck’s history class at Tahoma Junior High School.)

By Bruce Jensen

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

Edith Johnson Wright at Peacock Station on the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad, Hobart, 1911.

The following article is from an interview with Edith Wright who has lived in Hobart since 1909. The interview proved very fruitful, with Mrs. Wright being a veritable storehouse of facts about Hobart in the early 1900s. I had no trouble in obtaining the information from her and enjoyed the interview very much.

Edith Wright

Mrs. Wright’s father was one of the most colorful and influential figures in Hobart’s history, Oscar “Strawberry” Johnson. He was a leader by nature, and did much to improve the Hobart area.

In 1907 he bought the remaining 80 acres of the Clifford homestead and began raising strawberries. The first year, he planted two or three acres, but later he planted more. Penny Clifford peddled the berries in Taylor, Ravensdale, Black Diamond, and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 3, 1927

Carbon monoxide fumes fatal as Hobart lads change shoes in closet; Race to don clothes saves third playmate

Diplomas presented graduates while pair was trapped; absence overlooked in excitement

Hobart school students and teachers outside school entrance, 1927-1928.

Hobart school students and teachers outside school entrance, 1927-1928.

Death followed the fall of the curtain at the graduation entertainment of the grade school at Hobart, fifteen miles east of Renton, last night, when two 10-year-old school boys were overcome by carbon monoxide gas in a small closet where they were changing to their street clothes after the performance.

The dead boys are Donald Knutson, son of Mort Knutson, and Stillman Swanson, son of Mrs. John L. Swanson, a widow. The Knutson boy has been living at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Christina Colton, since the death of his mother some years ago. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 24, 1923

Every mine has its firebosses, but Newcastle is willing to stack its supervisory force against that of any other mine in the world, confident of winning first honors anywhere. To back up their boasts they present herewith the photograph of a group taken recently, most of whom had just come off shift. From left to right they are:

A. Elmer Anderson, Dick Richards, Mine Foreman Chas. Lumley, John Eck, Joe Daler, Wm. Bowie, and W.E. Jones. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 10, 1923

When the time came to finally stop the wheels and lock up the place for the temporary shutdown which stopped operations at Issaquah Mine, it was the group shown herewith who did the job.

From left to right, back row, they are Philip N. Chase, L.W. Foreman, Jas. E. Ash, Richard Bowman, Nick Oster, M.E. Potter; front row, Supt. M.A. Morgan, J.R. Hardie, J.H. O’Reilly, Wm. Cunningham. (more…)

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