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Posts Tagged ‘Issaquah’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 29, 1925

Gathered at the face of the rock tunnel in the New Black Diamond Mine, the men responsible for the excellent work of engineering and drilling which recently was completed there, are shown in the accompanying flashlight picture. The scene shows the men at the conclusion of drilling 28 holes in the barrier of 9½ feet of solid sandstone, which the blast broke down and connected the tunnel with the gangway which had been driven from the opposite side.

From left to right, they are; D.C. Botting, Bert Cook, Barney Doyle, F. Van Winkle, T.L. Jones (discoverer of the mine) , E.L. Fortney, foreman, L. Hayden, Jas. E. Ash, Chas. Gallagher, Ben Allen, foreman, R.W. Smith, Chas. Ryan, C. Busti. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 8, 1925

Playing good, consistent ball throughout the entire season, the Black Diamond baseball team ended up with flying colors, the champions of the Pacific Coast Coal League for 1925. Saturday night, October 10, the team will celebrate the close of the season with a banquet at the hotel.

In the picture, left to right, front row—F.C. Bergmann, secretary of the club; Geo. Spencer, Johnny Buck, Pete Gallagher, mascot; Neil Andreson, Mike Naffer, H.J. Babb, manager; back row Geo. Allen, treasurer; Grover Kertis, captain: L. Pierotti, Joe Daley, E. Moon Mullen, S. Paxton, Lou LaFray, Joe Snorski, and Wm. Nicholson, president. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 1, 1925

Judges at the Southeastern Alaska Fair, held at Juneau, September 15 to 19, decided that the booth of the Pacific Coast Coal Company was entitled to first prize among the strictly merchant displays, and second prize out of all the exhibits at the fair. While the picture cannot reproduce the full attractiveness of the booth, it nevertheless shows that H.G. Walmsley, the Juneau manager for the Pacific Coast Coal Company, is an artist in combining an effective display of black and white. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 28, 1947

Shell Oil Company seismograph crew working in Enumclaw area

Shell Oil Company leasing land in area north and northwest of Enumclaw preparatory to drilling for oil; expect real test of oil possibilities in area if Shell Company drills

Late Wednesday the Shell Oil Company, Inc., issued a press release in which they announced the company had acquired considerable acreage in the Black Diamond area from the Pacific Coast Company, Northern Pacific, and other large land holders. They also stated that drilling would start in a few days with the Crissman Drilling Company engaged to do the drilling. This is the first try for oil that the Shell Oil Company has made in the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 30, 1925

No feature of the First Aid and Mine Rescue Meet held last Saturday at Black Diamond attracted more attention than the exhibition in first aid and resuscitation work put on by the midget teams from Newcastle and Black Diamond. So far as is known, these two teams are the youngest First Aid teams in the world.

Fathers of the boys are miners employed by the Pacific Coast Coal Company, and the interest displayed by the youngsters is indicative of the efforts put forth by everyone to make mining safe. Members of the Newcastle team, in the front row, include Ernie Bahr, Howard Cotterill, Donald Gilbert, Clyde Joughlin, John Young, and Wm. Schuirman.

The Black Diamond boys, in the back row, are Elmon Rouse, John Gallagher, Harold Lloyd, Jr., Benny Hughes, Oliver Rouse, Jimmy Nicholson, and Ellis Ash. Harold Lloyd, Sr., trained the Black Diamond team and Wm. Jones was the instructor for the Newcastle lads. (more…)

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Originally published in the Puget Sound Electric Journal, Month unknown, 1919

By L.R. Grant

Coal Creek Mine bunkers, washers, etc.

What will eventually be one of our most important coal mine contracts was recently signed with the Pacific Coast Coal Company. It provides for all electrical power requirements of the briquetting and coal-crushing plants at Briquetville, near Renton, the mine at Coal Creek, near Newcastle, and the mine at Issaquah. The new contract will supersede the old contract at the briquet plant at once, and later on our existing contract at Issaquah. The rate is our regular rate for coal mines, Schedule C-15, Tariff No. 10.

The briquet plant and the mine at Issaquah have previously been described in the Journal. Coal Creek Mine is about five miles northeast of our Renton substation in a direct line, and about three miles east of Lake Washington, on a branch of the Columbia & Puget Sound Railway. The town of Newcastle, where most of the miners live, is less than a mile northwest of the mine. This coal field was one of the first to be developed in the State of Washington and has been worked almost continuously since its first opening. (more…)

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Originally published in Seattle Daily Times, May 20, 1919

Delegates from the various mining camps of the Pacific Coast Coal Company met recently in Black Diamond and formed an athletic and first aid association which promises to become a factor in the community.

The object of the association is to promote clean sport, build and equip clubhouses at the various camps, and to revive interest in healthful outdoor exercise. Two contests will be held in the near future, with prizes offered. The camps represented include Black Diamond, Newcastle, Issaquah, Burnett, Franklin, and the Seattle shops.

The following officers were selected to act as an advisory board: Ernest Newsham, honorary president; Stephen H. Green, honorary vice president; N.H. Freeman, president; Frank Rice, vice president; Dr. Mallory, treasurer; G.F. Clancy, secretary; one delegate from each camp.

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