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Posts Tagged ‘Issaquah’

Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 14, 1921

On another page of this issue of the Bulletin is a tabulation showing the daily average coal production of our mines last week.

The employees of the company who have been following the figures weekly—and of course each one interested in his work has—will see something significant in the totals presented.

In no week since the mines reopened has the company failed to show a steady gain in tonnage over the preceding week.

Sometimes, it is true, the increase was slight owing to the fact that difficulties were encountered for which neither the company nor its new employees were responsible; but whatever the figures they never failed to exceed those previously printed in the Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 8, 1923

October was a banner month in the production department, and demonstrated that the mines and the new forces are prepared to do their part at any time the coal market returns to normal.

All previous production per man per day records were exceeded at Black Diamond, Burnett, and Newcastle, and at Burnett the total hoist for the month passed anything in the history of the mine.

These gratifying results were achieved because every man from the highest supervisor to the lowest laborer was on his toes and because everyone took an intense and a sincere interest in doing his particular part in showing what “we” can do. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, October 1993

By Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Gathered on the front porch of the former Olson mansion on September 20 are Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and his wife, Cleo, at far right. In the back row are Ted’s nephews Jim Oien, Issaquah, and Keith Oien, Enumclaw, sons of Adeline Olson Oien; at back right is Vincent Olson, of Bothell, son of Ted. In front of Vincent is Ted’s daughter, Maureen Olson Engbert, of Seattle. In the front row are three nieces and a daughter; Jarine Olson Freeman, Seattle, Ivor’s daughter; Shirley Olson Patterson, Carnation, Olaf’s daughter; Shari Olson Lawrence, Woodinville, Ted’s daughter, and Virginia Oien Phelan, Seattle, Olga’s daughter. —Photo by Barbara Nilson

Sunday dinners and holidays were some of the special times at the Olson mansion on 216th, recalled Roosevelt (Ted) Olson and some of his nephews and nieces as they gathered at the mansion on September 20th for the historical society’s monthly program.

Eight Olson children, five boys and three girls, grew up in the home built about 1905. Roosevelt, known as Teddy, is the only son still living. Two daughters, Mrs. Adeline Oien of Kent, and Mrs. Anne Thompson, Seattle, are also still living. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 26, 1922

By Joe Osier

Fight fans employed in the operating mines of the Pacific Coast Coal Company and the “bugs” in the Seattle office of the concern on last Saturday night, October 21, were guests at a punching party staged at Black Diamond by the Black Diamond Athletic Club.

And, because there were plenty of punches to go around with enough left over for a 45-round World’s Championship go, everyone present enjoyed the fracas to the fullest with the possible exceptions of the a-the-letes who “win” the short end the pokes. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, October 25, 1923

Every afternoon, rain or shine, the men who report at the slope to catch the man trip down at 3:30 are always ready to comply with the photographer’s request to stand for a picture. It is with genuine pleasure that the Bulletin herewith presents a sextet of real fellows, a part of the crew which daily does a shift in Black Diamond.

From left to right they are: C.W. Bland, J. Pohorence, L. Raschka, S.E. Bennett, C.P. Capaci (otherwise known as The Sheik), and T. Strigen. (more…)

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Originally published in The Issaquah Press, October 24, 1990

Victor and Gustava Sandell, at left, brought their young family to Issaquah in 1888, and built one of the first large family homes in the city in 1889. Their daughter Alma and her husband Evan Watkins, right, lived in the house for many years. That home at the corner of Alder and First Avenue NW was a city landmark for a century. It was torn down last year to make way for a new apartment building. Photos courtesy of Walt Watkins.

Victor and Gustava Sandell, at left, brought their young family to Issaquah in 1888, and built one of the first large family homes in the city in 1889. Their daughter Alma and her husband Evan Watkins, right, lived in the house for many years. That home at the corner of Alder and First Avenue NW was a city landmark for a century. It was torn down last year to make way for a new apartment building. Photos courtesy of Walt Watkins.

Victor and Gustava Sandell were both born in Finland. They arrived in Issaquah in 1888 from Michigan with daughter Ethel and son Frank. Another son and daughter, Samuel and Alma, were born within a few years of their arrival here. (more…)

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