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Posts Tagged ‘Issaquah’

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 18, 1924

July Fourth was a big day for Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets at Sedro-Woolley. On that occasion W.E. Ropes of Ropes Transfer carried off first prize in the patriotic parade with the float shown in the above engraving. Mr. Ropes has been operating in Sedro-Woolley for 14 years and he handles Pacific Coast Coal Company coals exclusively.

Some fine specimens of Black Diamond lump coal were arranged along the top of the float just under the slogan, “Heat That’s Cheap,” while along the sides appeared the word “Briquets,” spelled out with genuine Diamond Briquets themselves.

On the same day in Everett the Pacific Coast Coal Company agency there also won first prize with a beautifully decorated float, a reproduction of which appears elsewhere in this issue of the Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 4, 1924

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Fourth of July celebrations in Black Diamond are always started off with a parade. This picture shows the parade of last year as it left the starting point in front of the hotel for the procession to the Ball Park. The citizens of the camp vie with one another in striving to attain perfection in patriotically decorated floats and cars. This year the usual parade will be a feature of the day.

Hospitality in unbounded measure is the welcome which will be extended all who participate in the Fourth of July celebration at Black Diamond. Particular emphasis is being laid upon the fact that the children are to be given first attention, free ice cream and refreshments having been provided for every child. (more…)

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Respect for the flag is one of the first marks of patriotism. The man who can talk the loudest about the duties of citizenship often forgets to uncover when the flag goes marching by, or sits with a bored expression on his face when the national anthem is played. It is not for the flag itself, but rather for what it stands, that every true American owes due homage and respect to its starry folds.

Salute the flag! Stand at attention to the strains of The Star Spangled Banner! For thus is patriotism fostered in the youth of our land and respect for law and order maintained. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 26, 1966

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

The mountain of coal outside the Rogers No. 3 shaft of the Palmer Coking Coal Co. operation near Black Diamond shows the extent of coal-mining activity that is still being carried on in King County.

At one time, coal mining was a big operation in the Puget Sound area. Before the turn of the century, the black gold was being dug from foothill sites such as Carbonado and Black Diamond, Newcastle and Franklin, Renton and Ravensdale, Coal Creek and Issaquah. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 6, 1924

Pacific Coast coal was used to bunker the vessels of three foreign flags within the past week. First to call was the Nazareno, an Italian freighter under charter to the Bunge Western Grain Corporation. She is shown above to the left just as the big craft was being brought alongside the bunkers for loading. Her destination after leaving Seattle was Europe, though at this writing she is ashore in the Columbia River.

The center picture shows the Wilhelm Hemsoth, a German ship, taking Black Diamond and South Prairie bunker coal. She sails this week for Australia.

At the right the graceful lines of the British freighter, Dramatist, show up to good advantage as she pulls out for Glasgow. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 5, 1919

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Issaquah coal mine, one of the Pacific Coast Company’s many properties

Employing a whole army of 2,500 persons—operating four different companies—and maintaining a payroll of approximately $4,000,000 a year—the Pacific Coast Company is one of the great corporations contributing to the prosperity and growth of Seattle and the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

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