Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘jail’

Originally published in the Globe-News, March 19, 1976

Can you believe this is what our present museum building looked like in 1976 when our original “work parties” began? Left to right: Louis Zumek, Chuck Holtz, Carl Steiert, and Archie Eltz. (BDHS calendar series, 1986)

Can you believe this is what our present museum building looked like in 1976 when our original “work parties” began? Left to right: Louis Zumek, Chuck Holtz, Carl Steiert, and Archie Eltz. (BDHS calendar series, 1986)

Restoration of the circa 1885 train depot on Railroad Avenue in Black Diamond slowed down during cold weather, said Ann Steiert, member of Black Diamond Historical Society.

“Volunteers have been working on shoring up the foundation and as soon as the weather breaks they will finish jacking it up, put in some new timbers, and a concrete footing.

“We have applied for a grant from Washington Historical Society to make the depot into a museum, but the bulk of our working funds have come from the sale of our 13-month historical calendar. We have $1,500 to go toward furnishing and framing the interior.”

Ms. Steiert said the museum depot was most likely the first structure in Black Diamond when the Welsh miners from Nortonville, Calif., came to mine in Black Diamond.

“They probably pitched their tents around the depot before they built cabins,” she said. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 16, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban reporter

An aerial view of the Black Diamond Museum, ca. 2005. The building was constructed in 1885-1886 as a train depot. Next to it is the only jail Black Diamond has ever had. (BDHS calendar series, 2009.)

An aerial view of the Black Diamond Museum, ca. 2005. The building was constructed in 1885-1886 as a train depot. Next to it is the only jail Black Diamond has ever had. (BDHS calendar series, 2009.)

Six buildings of historical value in King County may be in line for a $65,000 grant for restoration work.

The county Landmarks Commission recently made the recommendation; it needs an OK from the County Council.

The money would benefit the old former Snoqualmie Falls Electric Co. substation in Renton, $10,000; Company House 75 also in Renton, $6,500; the Bothell Historical Museum, $2,800; the Black Diamond railroad depot, $6,000; Hotel Skykomish in Skykomish, $25,000, and the Carnegie Library in Auburn, $15,000. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 4, 1984

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban reporter

Issaquah’s train depot was built in 1889, and now holds a museum with exhibits that explore the industrial revolution, travel, communication, and the early economic development of the city.

Issaquah’s train depot was built in 1889, and now holds a museum with exhibits that explore the industrial revolution, travel, communication, and the early economic development of the city.

Railroad depots, important to transportation and commerce in many communities throughout King County for many years, have been given a new role in recent times.

Relegated to obscurity as deteriorating warehouses or unused buildings beside seldom-used railroad tracks, some of them are now gateways into the past.

Depots at Snoqualmie and Black Diamond already have been turned into museums and monuments to community history. Those in Issaquah and Lester could be given the same roles if individuals concerned about preserving them have their way. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, February 8, 1993

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Black Diamond got its name from the Black Diamond Mining Company of Nortonville, Calif., which in 1880 was looking for high-quality coal for its customers.

The company found Valley-area coal to be soft and low in sulphur, so tent towns were pitched and Black Diamond became king of the coal industry. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 23, 1981

By Diane Olson

Shown above is the old Black Diamond City Jail, built in 1910. The Black Diamond Historical Society recently restored it. – VOICE photo by Diane Olson.

Shown above is the old Black Diamond City Jail, built in 1910. The Black Diamond Historical Society recently restored it. – VOICE photo by Diane Olson.

Black Diamond’s jail house is open! It even has an inmate. In fact the inmate has resided there for nearly two weeks now, and hasn’t even had a hearing, according to Carl Steiert, chairman of the Black Diamond Historical Society.

“The dummy” was created by Ann Steiert as a finishing touch to the historical society’s restoration of the old city jail.

The project began in 1979, when Steiert and others contacted Mrs. Harp, who owned the property where the jail had been siting for at least 40 years and arranged to purchase it for $150. (more…)

Read Full Post »

From left, Ted Barner, Bob Eaton and Frank Guidetti, members of the Black Diamond Historical Society, stand In front of the old railroad depot they and other members of the society have been refurbishing to serve as a museum of Black Diamond’s early days.

From left, Ted Barner, Bob Eaton and Frank Guidetti, members of the Black Diamond Historical Society, stand in front of the old railroad depot they and other members of the society have been refurbishing to serve as a museum of Black Diamond’s early days.

Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 3, 1980

By Herb Belanger

BLACK DIAMOND — Hang in there, King County. Black Diamond might be able to give you a hand with your overcrowded-jail problems.

Members of the Black Diamond Historical Society just might be persuaded to let the county use the long-empty city jail they’ve been rehabilitating along with the city’s long-unused railroad depot. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Valley Daily News, October 23, 1994

By Nathalie Overland

Voters in new city will pick name, with a look back at historic roots

Pam Lee, elected to the city council in the new city, has a number of historic buildings from historic Newcastle on her land. (Valley Daily News photo by Matt Hagen.)

Pam Lee, elected to the city council in the new city, has a number of historic buildings from historic Newcastle on her land. (Valley Daily News photo by Matt Hagen.)

A walk around Pam Lee’s historic “Newcastle” home is like treading on history.

A century-old house stands as silent testimony to a time when men were proud to burrow out coal—the black gold—from the bowels of the earth.

Across the street is the final resting place of a collapsed tipple, a monstrous wooden structure that once served as a terminal to unload and clean coal.

Down another path is the gaping mouth of a mine shaft. Rendered off limits by a massive grate, the shaft now serves as a backup water supply for neighbors.

“We’ve tried to keep this valley intact so that its integrity is protected,” said Pam Lee. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »