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Posts Tagged ‘jail’

Originally published in The Tacoma News Tribune, April 5, 1995

By Lisa Kremer
The News Tribune

Bob Eaton, president of the Black Diamond Historical Society, and his granddaughter Kelley Sauskojus are trying to get a miners’ cabin built in 1910 near Black Diamond designated a local historic landmark. (Peter Haley/The News Tribune.)

In 1910, two Italian men built a tiny house—barely big enough for beds, a stove, and a sink—to live in as they worked in the nearby mines of Black Diamond.

There’s not much to distinguish the house from hundreds of other small miner’s cabins that dotted the hillsides. Except that this house is still there, almost in its original condition.

Bob Eaton, president of the Black Diamond Historical Society, wants to preserve the house and designate it a local historic landmark. That would mean his granddaughter Kelley Sauskojus, who owns the cabin, could apply for state grants to repair and restore it.

But like all other South King County cities, Black Diamond doesn’t have a process to officially designate its local landmarks.

It’s so difficult to designate city landmarks that only two cities in King County—Seattle and Bothell—have done so, said Charlie Sundberg, a preservation planner with the King County Historic Preservation program. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, March 30, 1911

Deputy sheriffs forced to beat back ominous mob which surrounds shack used as jail

Dynamiting outrage followed by demonstration in which citizens take part as peace officers

1—The wrecked Christiansen home. 2—Where dynamite was exploded. 3—Interior of home after explosion. 4—Rasmus Christiansen. 5—Deputy Hill, at left, jailing a suspect at Black Diamond.

One hundred and fifty Italians, displaying all the voluble excitability of their race when in a dangerous mood, formed an ominous cordon about the little wooden shack that serves as a jail at Black Diamond yesterday afternoon when deputy sheriffs, after scouring the mining town all day, took into custody seven of their countrymen among whose number the authorities believe will be found one or more responsible for the dynamite outrage perpetrated on the home of Rasmus Christiansen early yesterday morning. (more…)

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Originally published in the Orting Oracle, May 26, 1916

Friday, May 26, 1916—Superior Judge Easterday last Tuesday sentenced Mayor Joseph McCaskey of Wilkeson $100 and costs of the trial and ten days in the county jail, he having been convicted of selling intoxicating liquors at his drug store in Wilkeson.

The total costs of the prosecution was $386.75, and the law provides that druggist convicted of violating the statutes cannot sell intoxicating liquors for any purpose for a period of two years unless they post a heavy bond to observe the law in making sales.

The $486.75 McCaskey was ordered to pay may be a small matter when compared with what he may have to yield up to the county. It is admitted that there is a strong grounds for the suspicion that A.A. Battiste, McCaskey’s pharmacist, who is out of jail on heavy bail for his alleged part in the selling of booze, has skipped the country. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe-News, March 19, 1976

Can you believe this is what our present museum building looked like in 1976 when our original “work parties” began? Left to right: Louis Zumek, Chuck Holtz, Carl Steiert, and Archie Eltz. (BDHS calendar series, 1986)

Can you believe this is what our present museum building looked like in 1976 when our original “work parties” began? Left to right: Louis Zumek, Chuck Holtz, Carl Steiert, and Archie Eltz. (BDHS calendar series, 1986)

Restoration of the circa 1885 train depot on Railroad Avenue in Black Diamond slowed down during cold weather, said Ann Steiert, member of Black Diamond Historical Society.

“Volunteers have been working on shoring up the foundation and as soon as the weather breaks they will finish jacking it up, put in some new timbers, and a concrete footing.

“We have applied for a grant from Washington Historical Society to make the depot into a museum, but the bulk of our working funds have come from the sale of our 13-month historical calendar. We have $1,500 to go toward furnishing and framing the interior.”

Ms. Steiert said the museum depot was most likely the first structure in Black Diamond when the Welsh miners from Nortonville, Calif., came to mine in Black Diamond.

“They probably pitched their tents around the depot before they built cabins,” she said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 16, 1983

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban reporter

An aerial view of the Black Diamond Museum, ca. 2005. The building was constructed in 1885-1886 as a train depot. Next to it is the only jail Black Diamond has ever had. (BDHS calendar series, 2009.)

An aerial view of the Black Diamond Museum, ca. 2005. The building was constructed in 1885-1886 as a train depot. Next to it is the only jail Black Diamond has ever had. (BDHS calendar series, 2009.)

Six buildings of historical value in King County may be in line for a $65,000 grant for restoration work.

The county Landmarks Commission recently made the recommendation; it needs an OK from the County Council.

The money would benefit the old former Snoqualmie Falls Electric Co. substation in Renton, $10,000; Company House 75 also in Renton, $6,500; the Bothell Historical Museum, $2,800; the Black Diamond railroad depot, $6,000; Hotel Skykomish in Skykomish, $25,000, and the Carnegie Library in Auburn, $15,000. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, January 4, 1984

By Herb Belanger
Times suburban reporter

Issaquah’s train depot was built in 1889, and now holds a museum with exhibits that explore the industrial revolution, travel, communication, and the early economic development of the city.

Issaquah’s train depot was built in 1889, and now holds a museum with exhibits that explore the industrial revolution, travel, communication, and the early economic development of the city.

Railroad depots, important to transportation and commerce in many communities throughout King County for many years, have been given a new role in recent times.

Relegated to obscurity as deteriorating warehouses or unused buildings beside seldom-used railroad tracks, some of them are now gateways into the past.

Depots at Snoqualmie and Black Diamond already have been turned into museums and monuments to community history. Those in Issaquah and Lester could be given the same roles if individuals concerned about preserving them have their way. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, February 8, 1993

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Photo courtesy of Black Diamond Museum

Black Diamond got its name from the Black Diamond Mining Company of Nortonville, Calif., which in 1880 was looking for high-quality coal for its customers.

The company found Valley-area coal to be soft and low in sulphur, so tent towns were pitched and Black Diamond became king of the coal industry. (more…)

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