Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Japanese’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 29, 1924

Making hay while the sun shines is a motto which J.F. Torrence, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company depot at Tacoma, believes in putting into practice.

Consequently, when coal orders slumped during the hot weather of July he fitted up the office with extra typewriters and employed ten young ladies to operate them until a total of 15,000 letters had been written, addressed and mailed, admonishing an equal number of Tacomans to follow the example of the thrifty and and lay in a winter’s supply of fuel before the chill winds of winter found them with empty coal bins.

The influx of orders which followed necessitated the putting on of another truck to make deliveries. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 1, 1924

What more could a girl want than to enjoy the privileges of membership in the Ta-Ta-Pochon Camp Fire of Burnett? Ask any of the young ladies who appear in the group shown herewith and you’ll get an emphatic answer. California’s press agents couldn’t muster a finer bevy of feminine pulchritude in all of Mack Sennett’s legions than Burnett can boast.

From left to right they are: Ida Ellis, Audrey Parry, Margaret Murnan, Alma Johnson, Lee Dora Bumgarner, Mary Jackson, June Vernon, Hazel Miller, and Lee Miller. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 25, 1924

Though it may have been considered futile and useless to talk of shipping coal to Newcastle—we mean the Newcastle of Merrie England—it is an accomplished fact that the Pacific Coast Coal Company ships coal to Vancouver, British Columbia.

Evidence of this is seen in the two scows here shown loading at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers. Each scow takes approximately 475 tons of Newcastle buckwheat coal, which is then towed to Vancouver for delivery to the British Columbia Sugar Refinery.

Approximately sixteen hours is required to tow the loaded scows to their destination. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 18, 1924

July Fourth was a big day for Black Diamond coal and Diamond Briquets at Sedro-Woolley. On that occasion W.E. Ropes of Ropes Transfer carried off first prize in the patriotic parade with the float shown in the above engraving. Mr. Ropes has been operating in Sedro-Woolley for 14 years and he handles Pacific Coast Coal Company coals exclusively.

Some fine specimens of Black Diamond lump coal were arranged along the top of the float just under the slogan, “Heat That’s Cheap,” while along the sides appeared the word “Briquets,” spelled out with genuine Diamond Briquets themselves.

On the same day in Everett the Pacific Coast Coal Company agency there also won first prize with a beautifully decorated float, a reproduction of which appears elsewhere in this issue of the Bulletin. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »