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Posts Tagged ‘Japanese’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 6, 1926

Thirteen years ago, in the year 1913, Black Diamond boasted a juvenile First Aid Team of which Al McBlaine, now master mechanic at Burnett, was the coach. The halftone shown herewith was made from a rather faded photograph in the possession of Supt. Paul Gallagher, of Black Diamond. But one member of this team, Paul J. Gallagher, is now in the employ of the company. Edwin Swanson, another member of the team, is a brother of Mrs. Elsie Upton, of the Accounting Department.

These First Aid boys, in Boy Scout uniforms, are still remembered for their participation in the famous Preparedness Day parade in Seattle before this country entered the World War. Those in the picture, from left to right, are; Jack Mitchell, Laurence Plano, Edwin Swanson, Donald Weston, Paul J. Gallagher, and Wm. Morgan. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 8, 1926

Orchardists throughout the fruit districts of Eastern Washington depend upon Diamond Briquets to protect their blossoming trees from damage by frost. Consequently, this spring the Pacific Coast Coal Company conducted an extensive advertising campaign in the Yakima, Walla Walla, and Wenatchee districts, featuring Diamond Briquets as the ideal fuel for orchard heating.

This picture shows a window display arranged in Yakima, through the courtesy of the Yakima Daily Republic and the Yakima Morning Herald. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 6, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The original depot at Kanaskat built in 1912 and destroyed by fire in 1943. — From the Museum of History and Industry and loaned by Ruth Eckes.

The old railroad towns of Palmer and Kanaskat once thrived across the Green River from each other, Palmer on the north and Kanaskat on the south; eight miles southeast of Enumclaw. Somewhere along the line the two lost their identities. Apparently, the post office located in Palmer burned and the authorities moved it to Kanaskat but left the name of Palmer. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 27, 1991

Open-pit excavations may take county refuse

By Charles Aweeka
Times South bureau

Trucks at the Pacific Coast Coal Co. wait to haul fine coal to Ravensdale where it will be loaded onto railroad cars and shipped to various locations locally and abroad. (Chien-Chi Chang/Seattle Times)

BLACK DIAMOND — One hundred and fifty feet below the earth’s surface, the coal in John Henry No. 1 Mine crunched beneath our mud-caked boots and shimmered in the sunshine.

“The blacker and shinier it is, the better it is,” said Mark Abernathy, business manager for the Pacific Coast Coal Co., which started the open-pit coal mine in 1986.

We were standing on what Abernathy calls a humpback because it resembles the back of a whale but what actually was the base of a 50-foot-wide seam of coal.

The mine may take on a new purpose soon.

Once the excavation reaches a depth of 250 feet, the Pacific Coast Coal Co. and John Henry Reclamation Inc. have proposed to use the pit as a landfill for King County construction, demolition and land-clearing debris.

The mining will go on simultaneously in another area of the pit, say the owners. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, January 23, 2007

By Barbara Nilson

The town of Fairfax, declared the “prettiest mining town around,” showing the turn-table at the extreme right above center. Mine buildings are in front and the school is on the left. Carbon River runs through the trees at the top or the photo. (Original copy from Mr. and Mrs. Tony Basselli.) Photo courtesy of Steve Meitzler, Heritage Quest Press, Orting, WA., publisher of the book, Carbon River Coal Country.

Riding the Northern Pacific Railroad to the upper end of the Carbon River Canyon or tooling along to Mount Rainier in a Model T, tourists would pass close to three mining towns: Melmont, Fairfax, and Montezuma.

First, beyond Carbonado, was Melmont, situated between the Carbon River and the NPR line. A bridge spanning the Carbon River ran between the company hotel and the saloon with the depot and school on the hillside above. On the left end of the bridge was the road connecting to Fairfax. This bridge was nearly a little beyond the high bridge which spans the canyon today. (more…)

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Originally published in Northwest Nikkei, May 1994

By Ed Suguro

A 1924 photo of the Selleck Japanese community. T.Z.Maekawa is the man in the striped tie with hand in pocket, third row from top; Heiji Sakakibara is the man standing next to him. The Rev. U.G. Murphy is sitting far right third row from bottom. Mr. Abo, the foreman, is sitting in the middle with the baby.

Before World War II there were a number of company sawmill towns like Mukilteo, Snoqualmie, Selleck, Eatonville, National, Onalaska, Walvill, and Longview in which the Issei worked and the Nisei grew up.

Selleck was about 10 miles east of Maple Valley and was recognized by the King County Landmarks Commission as a historical landmark and by the National Register as a historic district. It was a company town in which the Pacific States Lumber Company, one of the largest on the West Coast, employed a number of Issei.

Among those who lived there were T.Z. Maekawa, who worked at the mill, and the Rev. Joseph Sakakibara, who grew up there until high school. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March/June 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 29, 1924

Making hay while the sun shines is a motto which J.F. Torrence, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company depot at Tacoma, believes in putting into practice.

Consequently, when coal orders slumped during the hot weather of July he fitted up the office with extra typewriters and employed ten young ladies to operate them until a total of 15,000 letters had been written, addressed and mailed, admonishing an equal number of Tacomans to follow the example of the thrifty and and lay in a winter’s supply of fuel before the chill winds of winter found them with empty coal bins.

The influx of orders which followed necessitated the putting on of another truck to make deliveries. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

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