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Posts Tagged ‘Jones Lake (Lake #14)’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, December 24, 1913

Blast in Black Diamond Mine, of unknown origin, kills workman—his fellows in serious condition

Violation of rules suspected as cause: Required precautions observed by Pacific Coast Co., exposed lamp or match thought to blame

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

The superintendent’s office and the workings of Mine No. 14, circa 1905. This coal mine was located just east of Highway 169 as it starts downhill toward Jones Lake. Lawson Hill and Mine No. 2 are in the background. Photo courtesy of Frank Guidetti.

Jack Jackson was killed and Ned Rossi and Eugene Pelline, miners, were seriously burned in an explosion this morning on the tenth level of No. 14 mine at Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, April 15, 1992

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

Black Diamond’s new waste-water flushing tank is near the entrance to the city cemetery and is constructed of concrete. (Photo by Brenda Berube.)

It’s not pretty, but it’s functional.

At least that’s what Bill Lee, Black Diamond’s waste water project construction manager and city consultant, says of the city’s flushing tank recently erected at the Black Diamond Cemetery.

When operational, the concrete box will provide 20,000 gallons of water to flush a siphon in the waste water system along Roberts Drive.

According to Lee, there’s a drop in the pipe at Roberts Drive, and waste water has to go up a 24-foot hill before it flows out of the city. The flushing tank will send a rush of water through the system, pushing stray solids through the system.

The building is a tall, square concrete box at the entrance of the cemetery.

“Of all the options we looked at,” Lee said, “this was the least obnoxious.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 18, 1972

By John J. Reddin

A group of Black Diamond old-timers held a “little get-together” in the Black Diamond Eagles’ Hall Saturday for their old buddy, “Catfish.”

To thousands of Seattleites “Catfish” is better known as Ed Banchero, popular owner of E & E Meats, 1007 Olive Way, one of the city’s biggest meat wholesalers and restaurant suppliers as well as shipper of frozen meat to customers throughout Alaska.

But to those who have known Banchero ever since he was born in a log cabin near what is now the center of Black Diamond and later almost drowned in nearby Lake 14, he forever after was known as “Catfish.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Coast, August 1906

By J.W. Bussy, Black Diamond

Jones Lake 14 - Oct 1909 - photo 578 - BDHS 2003.87It was a delightful afternoon the early part of June. A fresh breeze ruffled the waters of Lake Jones into tiny waves, as we rowed out to the middle of the stream, our destination being the inlet at the farther end of that body of water which the sinking sun was rapidly transforming into a sheet of quivering gold.

A hasty glace revealed the unwelcome fact that we were not the only “pebbles on the beach.” Indeed in the shadows of the tall firs on the opposite shore were dimly outlined no less than three other boats, each with its eager angler. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, February 24, 1959

Cracker-barrel confab: Three town officials elected when Black Diamond incorporated as a fourth-class city last Tuesday, held a post-election conference in the town grocery store. From left, Mrs. Gertrude Botts, council member; Frank Costi, city treasurer and ex-officio city clerk, and Gomers Evans, Jr., councilman. Two of Mrs. Botts’ six children, David, 3, and Connie, 5, were in the foreground. The incorporation was a major step in efforts to rejuvenate the town, once a coal-mining center. —Times staff photo by John T. Closs.

Cracker-barrel confab: Three town officials elected when Black Diamond incorporated as a fourth-class city last Tuesday, held a post-election conference in the town grocery store. From left, Mrs. Gertrude Botts, council member; Frank Costi, city treasurer and ex-officio city clerk, and Gomers Evans, Jr., councilman. Two of Mrs. Botts’ six children, David, 3, and Connie, 5, were in the foreground. The incorporation was a major step in efforts to rejuvenate the town, once a coal-mining center.
—Times staff photo by John T. Closs.

By John J. Reddin, Times Staff Reporter

BLACK DIAMOND, Jan. 24 — This once booming coal-mining town, now “just another wide spot in the road,” is being given a taste of “Operation Bootstrap” by a group of spirited residents and merchants.

And, like a sick patient responding to a shot of adrenalin, the sleepy town is feeling the effects of its unexpected awakening.

Black Diamond virtually has stood still since the mid-1920s, when a strike closed several of the larger coal mines. A decrease in the demand for coal also has contributed to the “economic bust.” (more…)

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