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Posts Tagged ‘Kanaskat’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 2, 1925

William Rose is fatally wounded during battle between citizens and desperadoes in Pierce County

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

They stopped bank bandits. These are photographs of the posse that shot to death two bandits who held up the State Bank of Buckley yesterday afternoon and a section of the main-street in the town where the pistol battle was staged. 1—The building with white pillars on the left is the bank. The pair of bandits were slain a half-block away at a point in the center of the photograph. 2—View of the entrance to the bank, through which one of the bandits and the town marshal exchanged a volley of shots. 3—Marshal Ed. Nelson, left, and Aaron Haydon, former marshal, who fired the shots which mortally wounded the desperadoes when the revolver fight was at its height. 4—The bank officials who narrowly. escaped death at the hands of the excited robbers. Left to right they are: C.A. Stewart, assistant cashier; A.E. Hovey, cashier; C.A. Steberg, president. 5—Marshal Nelson, who headed a speedily organized posse of merchants.

In a revolver duel which followed the first bank robbery in the history of the town of Buckley, forty miles southeast of Seattle, in Pierce County, yesterday afternoon, two unmasked, unidentified desperadoes died “with their boots on,” and William Rose, 54 years old, business man of Buckley, was fatally wounded. Rose died in the Taylor-Lacey Hospital in Auburn at 8:15 o’clock this morning.

One of the bandits was shot from the running board of an automobile speeding away with the loot. The other was killed when he drove back for the body of his dead companion. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 17, 1891

J.C. Dillon crushed to death by a railroad train in a peculiar manner

Palmer, May 16 (Special) — While J.C. Dillon was at work on the track at Palmer station Friday morning the overland train came along unexpectedly.

He jumped out of the way and struck against a tripod which had been left close to the track with point toward it, so that there was only just room for cars to pass. He was crushed to death between the cars and tripod, the pulley block being jammed into his back.


Palmer was originally a telegraph station on the Northern Pacific Railway opened during the construction of the railway’s line across Stampede Pass circa 1886.

Between 1899 and 1900 the Northern Pacific built a cut-off from Palmer Junction (just east of Palmer), crossing the Green River to Kanaskat, and thence westward to Ravensdale, Covington, and finally Auburn.

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 27, 1961

By Lucile McDonald

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

Coal industry surges are an old thing to the town of Ravensdale. One such surge, in the late 1920s, brought reconstruction and modernization of the town, as shown above in a photo taken by Asahel Curtis.

“We’ve lived in coal revivals since 1915. We have spurts and then, they fall off,” observed John Markus, Sr., proprietor of Ravensdale’s principal place of business, a grocery on the Kent-Kangley Road.

The little community with the euphonious name in South King County’s coal belt is about to have another “spurt,” however. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 22, 2006

By Barbara Nilson

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930, now serves as the Pacific States Condominiums. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

The rebuilt Selleck School, completed in 1930. This April 10, 1940, photo is courtesy King County Assessor Property Card collection, Washington State Archives, Puget Sound Branch.

At the end the Kent-Kangley Road east of Maple Valley is the mill town of Selleck, which still exists today; next door was the town of Lavender, or “Jap Town.” The mill is gone, but the school is still there and about 16 of the original houses. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 20, 1902

He may be in the woods near Sawyer Lake or he may be miles away—No one knows

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

Tracy has apparently dropped as completely out of sight as though the earth had opened and swallowed him. Since his disappearance from the cabin on the shores of Lake Sawyer last Wednesday afternoon, or night, no trace of him has been had.

His long silence and failure to appear at some house for food and clothing lends weight to the opinion of Sheriff Cudihee that Tracy is still in hiding in the vicinity of the lake. (more…)

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