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Posts Tagged ‘Kanasket’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 2, 1925

Here may be nothing inspiring about the picture of a box car on the team track at Omak, Washington. But the significance of this scene lies in the fact that approximately seven thousand orchard heaters, designed to burn Diamond Briquets, were unloaded from that car last week.

These heaters are scattered throughout the orchards of the fertile Okanogan Valley, and in conjunction with the almost certain appearance of Jack Frost, will result in the consumption of hundreds of tons of briquets this spring where formerly briquets had never been seen. Similar shipments of orchard heaters have also recently been unloaded in the Yakima and Walla Walla fruit districts. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, December 7, 1941

Matt Starwich, King County jail superintendent and one of King County’s most colorful police officers, died at 11:22 o’clock last night in Swedish Hospital. He had been in the hospital since early last week, suffering from a complication of ailments.

Starwich, known affectionately for years as the “Little Giant,” had been in failing health since March 7, when he fell five feet on the roof of the County-City Building during Seattle’s test blackout.

The 62-year-old officer’s death ended a vigil that had been kept by his wife, son, and daughter at his bedside for more than 24 hours.

Starwich was the Americanized version of the family name. He was born Mateo Starcevis, son of a shoemaker, at Lich, near Flume (then in Austria), 62 years ago. When he was 12 years old he immigrated with a cousin to LaSalle County, Ill., and at an early age became a coal miner.

Starwich later moved to Marshfield, Or., and from there to Ravensdale in 1901, when there was little law in that mining community and less demand for it. Shootings, stabbings, and free-for-all fights were almost a daily occurrence there. The residents of the town used to brag about “riding” law-enforcement officers out on a rail. (more…)

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It’s the U.S. Post Office of Palmer all right, but it’s tucked away at the side of a residence in Kanasket. Puzzling? Perhaps the article will begin to clarify matters. (Staff photo by Lowell Lorenz)

It’s the U.S. Post Office of Palmer all right, but it’s tucked away at the side of a residence in Kanasket. Puzzling? Perhaps the article will begin to clarify matters. (Staff photo by Lowell Lorenz)

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 23, 1972

By Laura Lorenz

Logging trucks now roll along a paved two-lane highway past Palmer, a community that was once the center of railroad activity. Only a few decades before logs, coal, supplies, and passengers all rolled on rails. The dirt road was only passable for horseback. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe News, July 4, 1976

Story by Bill Smull
Photos by Smull, Larry Abele

Arrow-straight Burlington Northern rails streak toward Stampede Pass tunnel.

Arrow-straight Burlington Northern rails streak toward Stampede Pass tunnel.

Call it Palmer if you like—the post office has that name on its sign, and everyone will know that you’re most likely talking about the informal collection of buildings nestled between the north bank of the Green River and the Burlington Northern sidings. (more…)

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This 1908 photo is from Central Washington University’s Brooks Library Digital Collection, http://digital.lib.cwu.edu/.

Green River Hot Springs

Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, January 2010

By Ken Jensen

Being a relative newcomer to Black Diamond and a self-proclaimed history buff, I’m constantly peppering Archivist JoAnne Matsumura, President Keith Watson, and others with questions about the area’s history: Where was Mine No. 7? How did trains turn around in Franklin? Where was the town of McKay? Some of my queries can be resolved simply by checking out an old publication; others by checking in with an old-timer. Some take a little more digging.

Matsumura suggested such a challenge. A little-known town—a town a bit outside the usual Black Diamond Historical Society purview—but one of great interest to Matsumura (she collects postcards from the once remarkable hotel) and Vice President Don Malgarini (he spent summers there whiling away his childhood): Green River Hot Springs.

(more…)

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