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Posts Tagged ‘Kangley’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 28, 1925

Smashing a stolen bandit car stalled on railway tracks near Kanaskat, a Northern Pacific train scattered loot for several hundred feet along the right of way last night. Joe Bertelli, grocer of Kangley, identified ham, hominy, and other articles as his property, taken from his store a few hours before.

Deputy Sheriff Tom Smith of Enumclaw, who investigated the burglary, reported the bandits’ automobile was a stolen car taken from Seattle nearly a month ago. Search is being made for the fugitive.

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Originally published in the North Kittitas County Tribune, September 26, 2019

By Sue Litchfield

General Mine Manager John Kangley was a self-made man, an Irish orphan who made his way to the United States In the mid-1800s. At 45 years old, he was appointed general mine manager of the Northern Pacific Coal Company in Roslyn and served from 1888 to 1896. During that same time he also managed the Star Coal Company in Streator, Illinois, and owned the Kangley Mine near Ravensdale, Washington. Photo courtesy of Streator Times Press.

ROSLYN—This marks the fourth in the series of articles about early Roslyn history based on research at Northern Pacific archives in St. Paul, Minnesota. In the early years, Roslyn’s coal mining company was the Northern Pacific Coal Company (NPCC), owned and operated by the railroad. Following a major restructuring of the company in 1896, NPCC became the Northwestern Improvement Company (NWI), a subsidiary of the railroad.

John Kangley, who simultaneously served as general manager of two different coal companies, had two company towns named for him, owned coal mines in Western Washington, and invented one of the first ever coal mining machines.

Mob rule in Roslyn

The Dec. 30, 1888, telegram sent from Tacoma had a note of urgency to it.

“In taking the new drivers to Roslyn this afternoon [No. 3 Mine Superintendent] Ronald and Williamson were surrounded and knocked senseless by strikers…”

Roslyn had been a hotbed of contention since the Knights of Labor had gone on strike August 11, 1888. Ten days later, the Northern Pacific Railroad had brought in African American coal miners to finish development of their No. 3 Mine in Ronald.

Then on Christmas Day, 100 mule drivers went on strike, which effectively shut down their Roslyn operations, In response, Superintendent Ronald brought 10 African American mule drivers from Ronald to Roslyn, and all hell broke loose.

“…several new men badly used up,” continued the telegram addressed to Kangley, “and mob rule reigns in Roslyn tonight.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 4, 2002

By Barbara Nilson

The Tahoma baseball team of 1940 was largely made up of Ravensdale residents. They are: (front row) Gino Tedesco, Frank Primozich, Bob Lang, Gene Collins, Wally Habenicht, unknown, and Larry Krall; (second row) Otto Moore, coach; Frank Pooleskie and Louie Wallace; (back row) Frank Pichinini, Walt Olsen, Charles Fore, Kal Tantari, Bill Sweeney, Ed Kuhuski, and Tommy Lee — Photo compliments of the Maple Valley Historical Society

Memories will be flying fast and furious, Sunday, Sept. 15, as folks gather for the annual Ravensdale Reunion, 1 p.m., at the Maple Valley Community Center, corner of Witte Road S.E. and S.E. 248th St. The reunion is sponsored by the Maple Valley Historical Society.

No program is planned for the afternoon, just a chance to get-together over a cup of coffee and visit, share introductions and a tale or two over the open mic. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, March 30, 1988

Hang a sharp right at the Cooper Tire sign outside the Bremmeyer Logging Co. shop, breeze through a shady patch of Douglas firs, and there it squats on a distant back corner of King County’s park at Ravensdale: the Gracie Hansen Building.

She was quite a gal, this Gracie, whose bare-breasted “Girlie Revue” both wowed and outraged Seattleites at the 1962 World’s Fair.

In those days the building was known as the Paradise International Nightclub. It was the hottest thing in town.

Now it’s as desolate as an abandoned farmhouse. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1969

Before the Pacific States Lumber Co. closed its mill in 1939, Selleck was a neat little town with a school, meeting hall, water system, and post office.

The mill superintendent lived in house number 1, the company doctor and supervisors lived in the 300 row, and mill hands lived in the 200 and 500 rows. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, February 7, 1979

Maple Valley Tavern: Maxwell Rd. behind telephone company.

Maple Valley Tavern: Maxwell Rd. behind telephone company.

The expansion of Four Corners into a large shopping center has long been predicted. This week ground will be broken at the northwest corner at Four Corners in the first phase of a building complex for retail stores. The first tenant will be the Coast to Coast store which will move from Wilderness Village to the new site at Four Corners this spring on completion of a 12,000 square foot structure.

The portion occupied by Coast to Coast is part of the six-acre parcel of land which has been planned for development into grocery, drug, small retail shops, and other services or offices. Four Corners is actually the apex of State Highways 516 and 169 and two county roads. Locally they are known as Kent-Kangley Road, Maple Valley-Black Diamond Road, Ravensdale Road, and the Landsburg Road. (more…)

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