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Posts Tagged ‘Kennydale’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 25, 1906

James Sampson, a 13-year-old schoolboy at Kennydale, nearly caused the wreck of the Columbia & Puget Sound railway train near that place Tuesday afternoon by placing a hard wooden wedge on one of the curves to see what the passenger train would do when it hit it. When the locomotive hit the wedge it jumped some two feet, but luckily the train did not leave the rails. (more…)

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Originally published in the Renton News Record, July 31, 1952

Negotiations have been opened by the City of Renton to acquire a 15-acre swimming beach site near the Shuffleton plant from the Great Northern Railway, the News Record learned this week.

The Lake Washington property was formerly owned by the Pacific Coast Railroad but is now controlled by the Great Northern. City Attorney Arthur Haugan has contacted the railroad on a price for the property and is awaiting a reply. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS newsletter, Summer 2018

By William Kombol

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

“Rusty Rails” photo by Robert Dobson, April 2018

This spring photographer Bob Dobson stumbled upon a short section of railroad hidden amongst a dense forest near Lake Sawyer. He took a photo that inspired a question: “Who laid these rusty rails?”

Little did he know the answer is the story behind the men who founded Black Diamond. (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1996

Dear Bugle and Maple Valley Historical Society:
I might be able to give a little more history of Maple Valley and Hobart. Hobart was where the Sidebothams finally homesteaded or staked their claim to live.

I am not sure who came into the area first, Sidebothams or Peacocks—a few generations passed before it got to me. I would be the last to carry the Sidebotham name until my sons came along. I married Erma Lissman, graduate of Renton High School and a native of Roundup, Montana. We have four grown kids. I moved from Hobart fourteen miles to Kennydale.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Hobart and Maple Valley were just four miles apart, then (going east) came the town of Taylor. The town of Kerriston was the last little settlement or community in the timber.

Hobart thrived on logging. Wood & Iverson had a sawmill, a company store, and a bunkhouse that housed (board and room) about 100 loggers. There were three rows of company houses for loggers and families to live in. Many people had a little stump ranch with a few livestock, worked at the mill or logging camp, and went to Alaska for the fishing season for salmon. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1919

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road fronting the building is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road in the foreground is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

After a fight with the Board of County Commissioners that has lasted twelve years, the residents of Bartram Junction, three miles northeast of Renton on the Newcastle branch of the Pacific Coast Railroad, are to have a road outlet to the highways of the county.

The county board yesterday received from the State Public Service Commission permission to construct a temporary grade crossing over the railroad and Commissioner Thomas Dobson of the North District said today that one-half of the one-mile road from the Newcastle highway to Bartram will he constructed this year and that it will be finished next spring at an approximate cost of $2,500. (more…)

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