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Posts Tagged ‘Kent’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 7, 1937

The pig squealed and the chickens laid eggs.

And so Charles O’Shea, 29 years old, a glazier, was in the city jail today, accused of the theft off fifteen chickens and a pig from a farm near Lake Lucerne early yesterday.

Police here were notified of the theft by Kent police, who said the thief made off with the assorted livestock in an automobile. Detective Lieuts. A.T. Greathouse and M.J. Lowery, noticed a machine in Minor Avenue at Pike Street yesterday afternoon, with feathers strewn about the upholstery and eggs scattered on the back seat. They arrested O’Shea, who was the wheel. But the livestock was gone.

“The pig squealed so much he made me nervous, and the chickens laid eggs on the seats, and I released the whole outfit,” O’Shea told the officers.

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 22, 1913

1913 Buick touring car

Last Sunday morning Phillip Smyly, sales manager of the Buick Automobile Company in Seattle, started out in the general direction of Green River Valley. The trip lasted two and a one-half days and resulted in Smyly’s landing orders for four Buicks. He covered close to 400 miles on his jaunt, which took him through Kent, Auburn, Black Diamond, and other towns in that vicinity.

In Black Diamond he met a prospective buyer who said his order depended on whether the car could take a capacity load over Brooks Hill, a long, steep grade near the town that is notorious for its immunity from attacks by motor vehicles.

Smyly acquiesced, and to make the bargain good he added a sixth passenger. The manner in which the powerful little Buick ascended the grade made the Black Diamond man gasp. He remarked that “no car had done it before,” and then drew forth his checkbook. The notations he made on the paper made him the owner of a new touring car and Salesman Smyly smiled sweetly.

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Originally published in the Seattle Times, June 16, 1982

By Cathy Reiner
Times South bureau

King County Police Capt. James O’Brien would like to move his Precinct 3 (Southeast King County) police operations to the soon-to-be-vacated Fire District 43 fire station in Maple Valley.

Fire District 43 Chief Dwight Van Zanen would like to sell the fire station.

If the county and fire district commissioners agree, the move could solve some thorny problems for both police and fire operations. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 12, 1986

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

The Black Diamond city council Thursday unanimously granted a cabaret license to one tavern in the city, and in a split vote denied a license to another tavern.

The action came at the regular council meeting at city hall which was preceded by a public hearing on the licensing.

The council gave Jay Lewis of Black Diamond, who owns the Boots Tavern, a license to operate based on a police department report on the tavern located at 31119 3rd Street.

Councilmen Ben Gingrich and Rich Palmer voted against a license requested by the Black Diamond Saloon, however, located at 32707 Railroad Avenue. The vote was 3-2. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, April 14, 1908

One is found with bullet hole through his leg

Both confess participation in the shooting that led to the death of Kent marshal—Star staff correspondent with the posse when the men were captured—Prisoners give description of fourth man, who escaped

By G. Stuart Costello
Special Staff Correspondent

G. Stuart Costello, a member of The Star’s local staff, was the only newspaper correspondent actually with Deputy Sheriff Starwich’s posse during the hard tramp over the mountains on the trail of the murderer of Marshal Frank Miller. Other correspondents were some distance in the rear. This information does not come to The Star from Mr. Costello, who is a modest young gentleman, but comes from Deputy Sheriffs Joe Hill and Chet Belding, who reached Seattle this morning.

MARTIN, Wash., April 14—After a dramatic chase extending over 20 miles, over the crest of the Cascade mountains through Snoqualmie Pass, the posse headed by Deputy Sheriffs Matt Starwich and John Liner yesterday captured Yoven S. Borsvich, aged 23, and Nick Pettrich, aged 28, the remaining members of the gang, which on last Thursday night, shot and fatally wounded Marshal Frank Miller at Kent, and later wounded Deputy Sheriff Jack Storey in the Snoqualmie Valley.

Pettrich has a bullet hole through the lower part of his left leg and will either lose his leg or his life from blood poisoning. The man spent two days and nights barefooted in the snow of the mountains, and the wound is suppurating badly.

The wound was received in the battle with Deputies Starwich and Storey Saturday. One of Starwich’s bullets also passed through the lapel and back of the man’s coat. (more…)

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