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Posts Tagged ‘Kent’

Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, June 12, 1986

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

Black Diamond Store (left) and Saloon.

The Black Diamond city council Thursday unanimously granted a cabaret license to one tavern in the city, and in a split vote denied a license to another tavern.

The action came at the regular council meeting at city hall which was preceded by a public hearing on the licensing.

The council gave Jay Lewis of Black Diamond, who owns the Boots Tavern, a license to operate based on a police department report on the tavern located at 31119 3rd Street.

Councilmen Ben Gingrich and Rich Palmer voted against a license requested by the Black Diamond Saloon, however, located at 32707 Railroad Avenue. The vote was 3-2. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, June 4, 1925

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

More than million briquets made daily

In 1914 the Briquet Plant was opened and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that more than one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 23, 1925

Years ago, the railroad depot was the most popular place in every small city or town, and the daily arrival of the limited was an event seldom missed by the population. Automobiles and motor stages have changed all this, however, and today the highway is more popular than the railway. Nevertheless, the Pacific Coast depot at Black Diamond is still an important place in the camp, and the daily dispatching of long train loads of coal is a sight most pleasing to everyone. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Star, April 14, 1908

One is found with bullet hole through his leg

Both confess participation in the shooting that led to the death of Kent marshal—Star staff correspondent with the posse when the men were captured—Prisoners give description of fourth man, who escaped

By G. Stuart Costello
Special Staff Correspondent

G. Stuart Costello, a member of The Star’s local staff, was the only newspaper correspondent actually with Deputy Sheriff Starwich’s posse during the hard tramp over the mountains on the trail of the murderer of Marshal Frank Miller. Other correspondents were some distance in the rear. This information does not come to The Star from Mr. Costello, who is a modest young gentleman, but comes from Deputy Sheriffs Joe Hill and Chet Belding, who reached Seattle this morning.

MARTIN, Wash., April 14—After a dramatic chase extending over 20 miles, over the crest of the Cascade mountains through Snoqualmie Pass, the posse headed by Deputy Sheriffs Matt Starwich and John Liner yesterday captured Yoven S. Borsvich, aged 23, and Nick Pettrich, aged 28, the remaining members of the gang, which on last Thursday night, shot and fatally wounded Marshal Frank Miller at Kent, and later wounded Deputy Sheriff Jack Storey in the Snoqualmie Valley.

Pettrich has a bullet hole through the lower part of his left leg and will either lose his leg or his life from blood poisoning. The man spent two days and nights barefooted in the snow of the mountains, and the wound is suppurating badly.

The wound was received in the battle with Deputies Starwich and Storey Saturday. One of Starwich’s bullets also passed through the lapel and back of the man’s coat. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, March 27, 1930

Contract extending the paving of the Enumclaw-Black Diamond road for a distance of 1.14 miles has been let to Anderson and Liljebeck for the sum of $25,164.69.

Thomas D. Hunt, county engineer, has set the date for completion June 1, 1930.

Other south district projects to be awarded Monday, March 25, were Auburn-Black Diamond paving extension for a distance of 1.06 miles and the repaving of the Kent-Meredith Old Brick road for a distance of .86 miles, both to be completed June 1, 1930. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, December 16, 1921

Farmers living in the White River Valley were obliged to drive their cattle to the hills for safety.

Renton, Tukwila, and Riverton are under water and people traveling about the towns are obliged to wear hip boots or go on a raft.

Here in Enumclaw many basements were flooded by surface water but little serious damage has been done. Travel between here and Seattle on the highway was stopped by high water near Kent. That city suffered considerable from inundation.

Estimated cost of damage to roads and other losses in King County may run over $400,000.

The flood conditions have been worse than in any season for many years.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, October 10, 1979

By D’Ann Pedee

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

The event above is past history, but Tahoma High School’s new reader board is very much up-to-date, being installed only last week.

A dream became a reality last week as a blue and gold Tahoma reader board was erected.

For years, students and school personnel have wanted a means to advertise school sports and other events. With student monetary support, parental donations and labor, and the blessing of administrators, the sign stood in place advertising a recent home game.

The board is located on SE 240th at the south edge of Tahoma’s campus and can be read from both the Kent and Maple Valley entrances to the school.

“This sign has been years in planning,” said Pete Ryan, athletic director who is currently in charge of the sign’s upkeep. (more…)

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