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Posts Tagged ‘Kerriston’

Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 2, 1908

By “W.T.P.”

Suppose you were a policeman with a beat of 700 square miles.

Suppose this included sixteen coal mining towns, where the rough element predominated, and fights, murders, and all sorts of crimes succeeded each other so rapidly that you hardly had a breathing space between.

Suppose you were the only officer of the law in all this district, and that your hours were from 8 o’clock every morning, including Sunday, to 8 o’clock the next.

Suppose your duties had thrown you into desperate fights, open revolver battles, chases that lasted for days at a time through the seemingly trackless woods, and that a dozen times you had been within an inch of your life.

If you could meet all these conditions you would be the counterpart of Matt Starwich, deputy sheriff for the district of Ravensdale, and you would be an “every-day hero.” There are few people in the county who have more deeds of heroism to their credit than this same Matt Starwich. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1996

Dear Bugle and Maple Valley Historical Society:
I might be able to give a little more history of Maple Valley and Hobart. Hobart was where the Sidebothams finally homesteaded or staked their claim to live.

I am not sure who came into the area first, Sidebothams or Peacocks—a few generations passed before it got to me. I would be the last to carry the Sidebotham name until my sons came along. I married Erma Lissman, graduate of Renton High School and a native of Roundup, Montana. We have four grown kids. I moved from Hobart fourteen miles to Kennydale.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Pacific Coast Railroad No. 12 leads eastbound freight at Hobart, ca. 1942.

Hobart and Maple Valley were just four miles apart, then (going east) came the town of Taylor. The town of Kerriston was the last little settlement or community in the timber.

Hobart thrived on logging. Wood & Iverson had a sawmill, a company store, and a bunkhouse that housed (board and room) about 100 loggers. There were three rows of company houses for loggers and families to live in. Many people had a little stump ranch with a few livestock, worked at the mill or logging camp, and went to Alaska for the fishing season for salmon. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 13, 1908

Men who held up saloon and killed Samuel Johnson baffle efforts of dogs and sheriff’s posses

Officers express belief that fugitives have succeeded in boarding a train and are out of country

Although numerous messages were received at the sheriff’s office today from those searching the woods in the vicinity of Kangley, where two highwaymen, while holding up the saloon of Joe Lacerdo Saturday night, shot and killed Samuel Johnson, none contained any definite information as to the hiding place of the two desperadoes. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, December 17, 1986

By Jim Simon

You load sixteen tons and what do you get,
Another day older and deeper in debt,
Saint Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’’t go,
I owe my soul to the company store.

“Sixteen Tons,” by Merle Travis

It has become part of our folklore: the brutal, indentured existence of miners and millworkers eking out a living in sooty company towns. We all know it was a life of oppression.

But don’t tell that to Edna Crews. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS’s The Bugle, November 1997

By Eva Litras

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

Dale Coal Company in Ravensdale, a typical small mine of this area early in the century. Photo supplied by Maple Valley Historical Society Museum.

This is a story about the Elkcoal Mine—located off the Kangley-Kanasket Road. We moved there in 1929 and lived in a small house on Sugarloaf Mountain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Maplevalley Messenger, October 27, 1921

Burglars, believed to be operating with an automobile or light truck, broke into Gibbon’s store late Friday night or early Saturday morning and stole about $500 worth of merchandise of all description.

Tobacco, in the amount of $300, was the major portion of their loot. Other articles stolen include two sacks of sugar, all the hams and bacon, six pairs of shoes, socks, shirts, inner tubes, etc. Entrance was effected through a warehouse window. Deputy sheriffs are investigating. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, July 1994

By Barbara Nilson
Based on taped interview by Bill McDermand in November 1993 and interview by Barbara and Edward Nilson in June 1994.

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

“I’m the only boy from the Valley that made it to the big leagues,” said Johnny Lazor as he displayed his 1946 championship ring, “and I’m proud of it.”

But the road to the outfield of the Boston Red Sox in the World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals wasn’t easy.

He was born in Taylor in 1912 to Veronica and Michael Lazor (pronounced Lawser in the Valley but known as Laser like the beam in baseball circles) who had immigrated from Czechoslovakia. His folks met in New York in the 1890s and went to Franklin around 1908 for his Dad to work in the mines dumping cars. They then moved to Taylor where the first of four children were born.

The oldest was Mary, born in 1908, then Mike, 1910, and Johnny was next. In 1914 the family moved onto their 20-acre farm in Hobart and the youngest boy, Vincent was born.

His folks paid $10 an acre for the farm, which they sold in 1969 to the Bill McDermand family. It is located on the old road to Taylor (S.E. 208th St.) on the north side. When his folks moved here it had all been logged off, but huge stumps remained. Lazor said it took a box and a half of powder just to blow them open. (more…)

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