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Posts Tagged ‘Kittitas County’

Originally published in the North Kittitas County Tribune, September 26, 2019

By Sue Litchfield

General Mine Manager John Kangley was a self-made man, an Irish orphan who made his way to the United States In the mid-1800s. At 45 years old, he was appointed general mine manager of the Northern Pacific Coal Company in Roslyn and served from 1888 to 1896. During that same time he also managed the Star Coal Company in Streator, Illinois, and owned the Kangley Mine near Ravensdale, Washington. Photo courtesy of Streator Times Press.

ROSLYN—This marks the fourth in the series of articles about early Roslyn history based on research at Northern Pacific archives in St. Paul, Minnesota. In the early years, Roslyn’s coal mining company was the Northern Pacific Coal Company (NPCC), owned and operated by the railroad. Following a major restructuring of the company in 1896, NPCC became the Northwestern Improvement Company (NWI), a subsidiary of the railroad.

John Kangley, who simultaneously served as general manager of two different coal companies, had two company towns named for him, owned coal mines in Western Washington, and invented one of the first ever coal mining machines.

Mob rule in Roslyn

The Dec. 30, 1888, telegram sent from Tacoma had a note of urgency to it.

“In taking the new drivers to Roslyn this afternoon [No. 3 Mine Superintendent] Ronald and Williamson were surrounded and knocked senseless by strikers…”

Roslyn had been a hotbed of contention since the Knights of Labor had gone on strike August 11, 1888. Ten days later, the Northern Pacific Railroad had brought in African American coal miners to finish development of their No. 3 Mine in Ronald.

Then on Christmas Day, 100 mule drivers went on strike, which effectively shut down their Roslyn operations, In response, Superintendent Ronald brought 10 African American mule drivers from Ronald to Roslyn, and all hell broke loose.

“…several new men badly used up,” continued the telegram addressed to Kangley, “and mob rule reigns in Roslyn tonight.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, September 20, 1908

Track-laying rushed in five different places on Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul in Pacific Northwest

New towns spring up along route

Rich agricultural and fruit districts heretofore remote from traffic opened up to development

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

1—Columbia River bridge, under construction. 2—Steamboat St. Paul, used in construction of Columbia River bridge. 3—Completed piers of Columbia River bridge. 4—Water wheel furnishing power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley. 5—Scene in the timber, Snoqualmie Valley. 6—Flume carrying water to wheel to furnish power for sluicing, Snoqualmie Valley.

Records for fast work in the construction of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway in the Pacific Northwestern states, when the line is finished next year, may, and doubtless will, be found to establish a new mark in the “winning of the West,” to use the phrase employed as the title of one of his most interesting works, by the President of the United States.

A summary of present day conditions on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul may be gained from the following. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Times, July 26, 1920

Will compete for state honors in rescue and first aid work

About 350 heroes, worthy of a Tennyson but now only everyday heroes, will assemble at Roslyn Saturday, August 14, to compete for state honors in mine rescue and first aid contests. British Columbia also has been invited to send teams, and the 15 first aid ten mine rescue teams from mines throughout Washington may be augmented. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, July 5, 1923

Black Diamond was saddened the past week by the accidental deaths of two of the men employed in the mine, Frank Eltz, inside laborer, who met his death on Wednesday, June 27, and Joe Spinks, inside laborer, who followed Eltz over the Divide two days later, Friday, June 29.

Eltz was 37 years of age, born in Austria, March 20, 1886. He came to the United States in 1913, and has been with the Pacific Coast Coal Company since August 1921. He was working in the gangway of the 12th level, north, at 5:30 p.m., when a large piece of rock fell from the roof, killing him instantly. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, April 5, 1907

New construction in King County this year will call for thousands of laborers to hasten building

Harriman system must wait for franchise, but St. Paul will start out crews as soon as weather improves

More men will be engaged in new railroad work in King County this year than at any time since the county was organized. The pending railroad construction will be more important than any that has been attempted since James J. Hill brought a competing line into Seattle, for the new lines to engage in construction work this summer are real competitors of the systems already here.

As soon as the snow goes off in the mountains every man that can be picked up for railroad work will be hurried into the foothills to push the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul grades up toward the summit of Snoqualmie Pass.

The St. Paul will have thousands of men scattered from the King-Pierce line on the south, working toward Black River; taking up the work again at Maple Valley, where the road leaves the Columbia & Puget Sound tracks, and carrying it on to the Kittitas County line in Snoqualmie Pass. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 28, 1921

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

George Watkin Evans (1876-1951), 1924 Courtesy Seattle and Environs

George Watkin Evans, 1924

The purpose of this preliminary sketch is to give the readers of the Bulletin a general view of the coal fields of the state, this to be followed by more detailed articles covering each of the counties in which coal occurs in commercial quantities.

Near the northern boundary line of the state, on the northwest slope of Mt. Baker, there is a small area containing anthracite and anthracitic coal. So far no commercial mines have been developed within this field.

Westward and near the shore of Bellingham Bay, is an area containing a coal bed that is being developed by the Bellingham Mines Company. It is not known at present what the full extent of this area is, but it is probable that additional discoveries will be made in Whatcom County. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 31, 1922

Three chicken eaters: Waylie Hemphill, Gen. Sales Mgr., on left; A.F. Marion, Chief Engineer Pacific Coast Company, in center; and N.D. Moore, Vice-President, at far end, are here shown smiling in anticipation of that big chicken feed at Burnett, on Labor Day.

Three chicken eaters: Waylie Hemphill, Gen. Sales Mgr., on left; A.F. Marion, Chief Engineer Pacific Coast Company, in center; and N.D. Moore, Vice-President, at far end, are here shown smiling in anticipation of that big chicken feed at Burnett, on Labor Day.

We are all going to have a good time at Burnett on next Monday, when the Western Washington First Aid and Mine Rescue meet is to be held at that camp.

Burnett, apparently out to make a record in hospitality, has increased the list of sports to be given on that day, until about everything that could possibly go with such an outing has been included.

Games for everybody, old and young, large or small, chicken dinner, music, a grand ball, problems in relief and rescue for which picked teams have been training for weeks, special events calculated to keep the fun going all day, and most of the night, free ice cream and candies for the youngsters, races for cash prizes, special motion picture show, and contests designed to stir the mirth of the most sad—these are only a few of the good things down on the bill of fare.

The program, as amplified, includes at least a dozen sports not originally included, and will keep things moving at least until 1 a.m., when the Grand Ball, given at the hotel, will close. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 26, 1957

By Lucile McDonald

Washington has plenty of the black mineral but its production has fallen tremendously

A truck loaded coal at the tipple of the Cougar Mountain mine for hauling to the Newcastle storage bunkers. – Photos by Parker McAllister.

Washington’s coal industry is in a state of suspended animation. Once a heavy contributor to the prosperity of the region, it is represented now by only a few scattered operations. Diesel oil, electricity and, lately, natural gas have cut off the markets.

Coal production in the state declined from a peak in 1918 of 4,128,424 tons to an average of 600,000 tons annually.

In King County, which owes its early economic development largely to its bituminous-coal beds, only five mines are active.

Refuse dumps and sealed tunnels south and east of Lake Washington, south of Lake Sammamish and in the Cedar and upper Green River Valleys attest the once-wide extent of mining within a few miles of Seattle. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, January 25, 1922

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922The articles written thus far describing the coal fields of the State of Washington have dealt with fields which, with the exception of the Bellingham coal mines in Whatcom County, do not contain coal mines of very great commercial importance.

King County, next in order of discussion, is one of the three important bituminous coal areas of the state, the other two being Pierce and Kittitas counties. King County contains coal areas of such importance that it will be advisable to divide them under subdivisions, as follows:

Newcastle–Issaquah–Grand Ridge area; Cedar River area; Raging River–Upper Cedar River area; Ravensdale–Black Diamond area; Pacosco–Hyde area; Kummer–Krain area; National–Navy area; Bayne–Pocahontas area; Durham–Kangley area.

By subdividing the field into the above groups, the geological structure of the fields and the types of coal contained in them can be handled to best advantage. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 12, 1921

By Geo. Watkin Evans, consulting coal mining engineer, Seattle

Pacific Coast Coal Co. Logo 1922Before proceeding with the details of the several coal fields in the state, describing their geology and also the coal mines operating within these fields, it will be well to explain, briefly, some of the important terms to be used in this series of papers, so we will have a standard to work by.

It is the intention of the writer to make these articles as non-technical and simple as possible, but in dealing with a subject of this nature, certain technical terms must necessarily be used. (more…)

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