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Posts Tagged ‘Knights of Pythias’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 4, 1926

Editors and publishers of approximately 100 newspapers in the State of Washington were the guests of the Pacific Coast Coal Company at Newcastle and the Briquet Plant, last Saturday. This excursion was the closing feature of the Fourteenth Annual Newspaper Institute of the Washington Press Association.

The picture shows the group ready to board the special train after having made a trip into the Primrose Seam, a mile and a quarter into the heart of the mountain, from whence comes the famous Newcastle coal. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 10, 1925

That all men who ride coal trips are not coal miners is proven by this picture. The Bulletin photographer caught this trip just before it started for the twelfth level of Black Diamond Mine, where more than 1,500 feet below sea level, an attempt was made by radio experts to log some of the programs with which the air above the surface is charged. But the mine was too deep for the radio waves.

Cager Victor McDonald and Supt. Paul Gallagher are shown on the rear end, with Manager of Mines D.C. Botting in the car. Joe Bennett and Maj. S.E. Hutton are in the lower car. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 5, 1925

Before sailing from Seattle for the United Kingdom and the Continent this week, the S.S. Oklahoma of the French Line, Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, managed on the Pacific Coast by the General Steamship Corporation, filled her bunkers for the long voyage with steam coal from the Pacific Coast Coal Company. This vessel is one of a fleet of fine steamers owned by the French Line, including the Mississippi, Georgia, and Arizona, all of which ply in the Puget Sound service. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1914

Solid gold decorations conferred upon five men who have been members twenty-five years

FRANKLIN, Monday, June 1—Veteran jewels of solid gold, handsomely decorated and inscribed, were conferred with special ceremony here Saturday night upon five Knights, who have been twenty-five years in the Pythian order.

The recipients were: Charles McKinnon, Black Diamond; David Nellis and David Daniels, of Vancouver B.C., members of Green River Lodge No. 33, Franklin; and Watkin Evans, of Rainier Lodge No. 17, Black Diamond. The last named is the father of former Deputy County Engineer George Evans, and now an Alaskan mining expert of note. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 21, 1913

Postmaster & Postmistress Fred H. & Antoinette Tonkin with little Jim in their home #105 on 3rd Ave.

Postmaster & Postmistress Fred H. & Antoinette Tonkin with little Jim in their home #105 on 3rd Ave.

Black Diamond man is practically certain of becoming grand chancellor of Washington Knights

Few contests for officers are apparent: Approximately 1,000 men and 200 women members of auxiliary order are attending sessions in Tacoma

TACOMA, Wednesday, May 21 — When the Washington Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, now meeting here in the order’s thirtieth annual state convention, went into session this afternoon behind closed doors for the annual election of officers, the elevation of Fred H. Tonkin, of Black Diamond, to the position of grand chancellor was regarded as a foregone conclusion. (more…)

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Extracted from Carbonado: The History of a Coal Mining Town in the Foothills of Mount Rainier, 1880-1937, by John Hamilton Streepy, May 1999

Row of tombstones from the December 9, 1899 catastrophe at Carbonado.

Row of tombstones from the December 9, 1899 catastrophe at Carbonado.

Rees Jones, the fireboss, declared mine number seven clear of gas on 9 December 1899, and allowed the morning shift to enter the mine to begin their workday. With his pipe and tobacco firmly in his pocket, Ben Zedler and seventy-two others started their long march into the depths of the earth to mine coal on the shift from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.1 (more…)

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