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Posts Tagged ‘Knights of Pythias’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 19, 1924

Steamships of the Nippon Yusen Kaisha line have been coming into Seattle for more than twenty-five years, in fact, this famous line was the first to establish regular service between Puget Sound ports and the Orient. Recognizing the superior qualities of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal for bunkering purposes, the vessels of the N.Y.K. fleet have frequently coaled at the Pacific Coast Coal Company bunkers.

The accompanying half-tone is a reproduction of a photograph taken of the Shidzuoka Maru while loading 1,000 tons of Black Diamond and South Prairie coal at the company bunkers last week. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 1, 1914

Solid gold decorations conferred upon five men who have been members twenty-five years

FRANKLIN, Monday, June 1—Veteran jewels of solid gold, handsomely decorated and inscribed, were conferred with special ceremony here Saturday night upon five Knights, who have been twenty-five years in the Pythian order.

The recipients were: Charles McKinnon, Black Diamond; David Nellis and David Daniels, of Vancouver B.C., members of Green River Lodge No. 33, Franklin; and Watkin Evans, of Rainier Lodge No. 17, Black Diamond. The last named is the father of former Deputy County Engineer George Evans, and now an Alaskan mining expert of note. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 21, 1913

Postmaster & Postmistress Fred H. & Antoinette Tonkin with little Jim in their home #105 on 3rd Ave.

Postmaster & Postmistress Fred H. & Antoinette Tonkin with little Jim in their home #105 on 3rd Ave.

Black Diamond man is practically certain of becoming grand chancellor of Washington Knights

Few contests for officers are apparent: Approximately 1,000 men and 200 women members of auxiliary order are attending sessions in Tacoma

TACOMA, Wednesday, May 21 — When the Washington Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias, now meeting here in the order’s thirtieth annual state convention, went into session this afternoon behind closed doors for the annual election of officers, the elevation of Fred H. Tonkin, of Black Diamond, to the position of grand chancellor was regarded as a foregone conclusion. (more…)

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Extracted from Carbonado: The History of a Coal Mining Town in the Foothills of Mount Rainier, 1880-1937, by John Hamilton Streepy, May 1999

Row of tombstones from the December 9, 1899 catastrophe at Carbonado.

Row of tombstones from the December 9, 1899 catastrophe at Carbonado.

Rees Jones, the fireboss, declared mine number seven clear of gas on 9 December 1899, and allowed the morning shift to enter the mine to begin their workday. With his pipe and tobacco firmly in his pocket, Ben Zedler and seventy-two others started their long march into the depths of the earth to mine coal on the shift from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.1 (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 12, 1888

A community where constables and officers of the law are not needed—Remarkable progress and substantial prosperity

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Probably the majority of the readers of the Post-Intelligencer have never inspected a coal mine or visited a town where coal mining was the exclusive industry. They have, therefore, necessarily but an imperfect knowledge of a large and very excellent class of the working population of this territory, and especially of King County.

A representative of this paper visited Franklin, in this county, a day or two ago and made some observations which may be of general interest. (more…)

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Originally published in the BDHS Bulletin, Winter 2016

By William Kombol

PCC228

Loaded train in Franklin, 1902

The town of Franklin was developed for coal mining and operated as a company town from around 1885 to 1922. At its peak there were approximately 1,100 people living and working in Franklin. The town’s beginning and purpose were linked to 50-million-year-old coal seams exposed along the deep gorge cut through bedrock.

Explorers discovered the coal while traveling through the Green River Gorge in the early 1880s leading to the founding of nearby Black Diamond. The Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad was extended from Renton to Franklin in 1885 allowing coal production to commence and the town to develop. The town was named for the famed American patriot, Benjamin Franklin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, December 9, 1999

Cindy Calton looks at the headstone of Howell Meredith, killed when he went into the mine to look for his son. In foreground is a photograph of her great-grandfather Alfonso Anzelini, who called in sick on Dec. 9, 1899, and lived to work another day.

Cindy Calton looks at the headstone of Howell Meredith, killed when he went into the mine to look for his son. In foreground is a photograph of her great-grandfather Alfonso Anzelini, who called in sick on Dec. 9, 1899, and lived to work another day.

By Bart Ripp

On a dark, dank December Saturday in a coal mine town above the Carbon River, a steam whistle, shrill and loud, pierced the mist.

Some 2,500 people lived in Carbonado. They knew the whistle meant something had happened down below. But they never felt a rumble. And the men and boys working in Carbon Hill Coal Corporation mine No. 7 never had a chance.

Thirty-three died that day when the mine exploded in fire and fumes. Welsh and Finns, Belgians and French, husbands, fathers, sons and brothers. It was 100 years ago today [1999].

Pierce County’s worst mining disaster happened Dec. 9, 1899 in a town with the smudged but symphonic name of Carbonado. Call it “Car-bun-AAA-doe.” (more…)

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