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Posts Tagged ‘Krain’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, December 31, 1925

Every miner at Black Diamond probably knows the three men whose likenesses appear above. If there is one who doesn’t, he should. They represent the three phases of coal mining most vital to the industry; efficiency and economy in operation, safety inspection, and first aid and mine rescue training.

In Supt. Paul Gallagher largely rests the success or failure of the mine’s operation. Closely related is the safety inspection, directed by Deputy State Mine Inspector, Geo. T. Wake, under the able supervision of Wm. R. Reese, Chief Inspector. And last but not least is John G. Schoning, of the United States Bureau of Mines, who patiently drills the men in the principles of first aid and mine rescue work. All three indispensable. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, September 10, 1909

The Labor Day celebration at Black Diamond was a notable event, and all the arrangements were carried out in good style. The crowd in attendance was said to be the largest ever seen at the Diamond.

The parade in the morning showed a full turnout of United Mine Workers, and there were three bands in line. Burnett had some sixty men in line, led by the Enumclaw band, and several hundred came from Seattle, Renton, Ravensdale, and Franklin. The Seattle and Black Diamond bands gave excellent music throughout the day.  (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 28, 1947

Shell Oil Company seismograph crew working in Enumclaw area

Shell Oil Company leasing land in area north and northwest of Enumclaw preparatory to drilling for oil; expect real test of oil possibilities in area if Shell Company drills

Late Wednesday the Shell Oil Company, Inc., issued a press release in which they announced the company had acquired considerable acreage in the Black Diamond area from the Pacific Coast Company, Northern Pacific, and other large land holders. They also stated that drilling would start in a few days with the Crissman Drilling Company engaged to do the drilling. This is the first try for oil that the Shell Oil Company has made in the Pacific Northwest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier, September 22, 1911

A sixteen-foot vein of coal has been found by Anton Gortz on his place north of town. He has dug out several tons, and the coal is said to be of excellent quality, better than most of the coal found in this region. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, January 12, 1934

Payroll statement is clue that leads to recovery of loot and arrest of 3 Wednesday

Jack’s Place, ca. 1940, was located near the Green River Gorge Resort on the east side of the river.

Jack’s Place, ca. 1940, was located near the Green River Gorge Resort on the east side of the river.

A Pacific Coast Coal Company payroll statement, picked up near the service station operated by George Tethaway, at Green River Gorge proved the “clue” that led to the arrest late Wednesday afternoon of G.M. Smith, Chester Justice, and Glen Braemer, Black Diamond mine workers, and the lodging of the trio in the King County jail, awaiting probable charges of burglary.

The arrests were made by Deputy Sheriff Tom Smith of Enumclaw, Highway Patrolman Bill Ross of Buckley, and Deputy Sheriffs Allingham and Sears, of Seattle—less than twenty-four hours after Tethaway and Jack Rudgers had reported to Enumclaw police the burglary of their respective service stations at Green River Gorge. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, May 21, 1953

Jerry Steiert, Black Diamond

Jerry Steiert, Black Diamond

Three weeks of hard but interesting work came to a close last Saturday night at 9 o’clock when the Courier-Herald subscription campaign ended. Three girls and five boys who worked in the campaign received bicycles and the others received cash commissions of 15% of all money they turned in.

The official judges’ count disclosed that five bicycles went to candidates living in the territory outside Enumclaw city, and three went to boys and girls living in Enumclaw city.

Highest of all candidates was Kelly De Marco, who had first choice of prize bicycles and had his favorite bicycle out of the door in less than one minute after he reached the office when he was telephoned at the conclusion of the vote count on Saturday night. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

By Brenda Sexton

krain-cemetery-familiesFor more than 120 years, members of the Catholic Church and community have been gathering at the Holy Family Cemetery in Krain at sunset to recite the Rosary and light candles on the graves of the dearly departed for the Feast of All Saints. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

The original Krain tavern and boarding house, circa 1900. Constructed in the 1890s, the building was torn down in 1907.

By Brenda Sexton

Nearly every day at the Krain Corner Inn, owner Karen Hatch gets a history lesson.

Through the 22 years she’s owned the restaurant at the corner of State Route 169 and Southeast 400th Street, she’s collected newspaper articles, photographs and saved the personal letters folks have written about their visit to the historic building and the area of Krain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 26, 2011

krain-coverBy Brenda Sexton

There was a time when the Plateau was covered with bustling, individual communities.

Most had their own school house, community or dance hall and store. They may have had a church, saloon or specialty shop. Most had a band or baseball team. Some had both.

They were filled with farmers, miners and loggers, most arriving from Europe.

Each community had its own heart and soul.

Those areas still serve as reference points for those who live in the Enumclaw area. Ask many today where they live and chances are they will answer with names like Veazie, Osceola, Wabash, Selleck, Birch, Franklin, Flensted, Cumberland, Boise and Krain. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, October 24, 2001

By Brenda Sexton

The Krain cemetery has been used by Plateau families for generations, but is filled up. That problem is being solved by using space within the cemetery for additional burial plots. The photo above shows the oldest grave marker in the cemetery, dated 1891.

The Krain cemetery has been used by Plateau families for generations, but is filled up. That problem is being solved by using space within the cemetery for additional burial plots. The photo above shows the oldest grave marker in the cemetery, dated 1891.

When Eileen Francis Verhonick died in August at the age of 80, she was buried with her family at Holy Family Cemetery in the Plateau’s Krain area.

Verhonick and a number of families like hers have held burial plots at the Krain cemetery since the 1800s. Just a few steps away from Verhonick’s final resting place lies the oldest marker, that of Mary Kump (born Jan. 4, 1890, died Jan. 15, 1891).

Verhonick, Kump and others like them are buried at Holy Family Cemetery because their ancestors are there. According to Sacred Heart Catholic Church’s faith formation leader Mathew Weisbeck, when the cemetery was first formed it was designed so family groups would stay together. Today, there are about 42 family areas there, each with about eight burial spots.

Getting an accurate count on how many people are buried there now is difficult, but Weisbeck said approximately 267, and, for all practical purposes, the cemetery is full.

Until now. (more…)

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