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Posts Tagged ‘Labor Day buttons’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, September 1994

By Heather Larson

Left to right: Jennifer Simmons, Danny Simmons, and Ashley Petersen prepare to enter the parade route in their horse-drawn wagon representing Four Corners Safeway.

Black Diamond celebrated Labor Day weekend with a fever this year. After having last year’s event cancelled for lack of volunteers, no holds were barred. Something for everyone was offered during the 4 days from a fish dinner on Friday night to a bed race on Sunday and a parade down the Maple Valley Highway on Monday.

On Saturday amid torrential downpours the Black Diamond Police challenged the Black Diamond Fire Department to a softball game. Since the police, who chose to be called the DARE Devils, didn’t have the manpower to field a team, other police officers who live in Black Diamond were asked to help out. So King County, Bellevue, and Seattle Police Departments were also represented on the team.

According to Black Diamond officer Glenn Dickson, the highlight of the game was the 8-foot mud pit behind first base.

It was really wet and muddy, but a good time was had by all, said Dickson.

The DARE Devils beat the Hosers 13 to 9 at the first annual baseball game. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, August 31, 1994

Wally’s World by W.J. DuChateau

You may recall the time Evelyn pelted her husband, Joe, with eggs. It happened at one of the Black Diamond’s “egg contests,” in which couples try to softly catch eggs that are lofted back and forth between partners. But toward the end of this particular contest, things disintegrated into a general free-for-all; to paraphrase Ken Kesey’s popular observation, the game turned into a first-class egg-storm. Just ask Joe. (If you’re so inclined, it’s a wonderful way to garner revenge on your spouse.)

Or maybe you recall scrambling about in a pile of straw or shavings, anxiously searching for a few pennies, nickels, or dimes—the exact denomination depending upon the year and inflation rate at the time. But no matter how valuable the coins, you literally beamed with the joy and excitement of finding them.

It was called, perhaps inaccurately, a “penny hunt.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 28, 1977

By George and Dianne Wilson

Planning has begun to offer Black Diamond, and especially its children and young people, a traditional Labor Days celebration. At a well-attended first meeting last week, eighteen interested persons began to draw the plans that will make the celebration possible.

Sid Bergestrom and Steve (Home Smith) Gustin are acting as temporary co-chairmen. Sue Capponi will be in charge of the Finance Committee which involves soliciting donations for prizes, etc. Chuck Capponi will handle the Soap Box Derby, George and Dianne Wilson will do the promotions.

There was a general consensus among those attending that the event was mainly intended to be for Black Diamond and the smaller Valley cities rather than for large numbers of Seattle area people who unfortunately have viewed it as opportunity to come into this area to drink and “tear up the town.” (more…)

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Originally published in The News Tribune, April 23, 1995

By Lisa Kremer
The News Tribune

For 47 years, Black Diamond’s Labor Day celebration has displayed the essence of a close-knit small town.

There were three-legged races. A greased-pole climb. A shoe-kicking contest. And a parade everyone in the community could join—and did.

But this year, organizers are afraid there might be no three-day Labor Day celebration. Only three people came to the last organizational meeting, said Lorianne Taff, who was there.

Taff moved to Black Diamond less than two years ago.

“I fell in love with the town and the charm of the town, and I want to see it preserved,” Taff said. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, August 24, 1958

A bullfrog-jumping contest will be a highlight of Black Diamond’s annual Labor Day weekend celebration.

The number of entries still is undetermined, said John Crivello, a Black Diamond businessman.

“It all depends on the number of frogs the kids can find in lakes and ponds between now and post time,” Crivello said.

The weekend of celebration will begin at 10 o’clock Saturday night with a dance in the town Masonic Hall. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, September 1, 1968

Georgia Paletta will reign as queen of the annual Black Diamond Labor Day festival today and Monday.

The 18-year-old Lake Sawyer girl is the daughter of Mrs. Robert Paust of 29807 232nd Ave. S.E. Miss Paletta will be crowned at ceremonies today at 1 p.m. in the city park.

Her court includes Princesses Jodine Dal Santo and Pauline Bunker, both of Black Diamond.

After the ceremonies, the day’s activities include a four-mile walking race with contestants from Oregon, Montana, California, Idaho, and Washington competing; a frog-jumping contest; boys’ bicycle race, and entertainment.

Monday’s program starts with a parade at 10 a.m. and judging of floats and participating marching groups. A fast-pitch softball game will highlight the afternoon activities.

Vic Weston, long-time sports figure in the Puget Sound area, is festival chairman.

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Originally published in the Renton News Record, August 25, 1960

Black Diamond’s Labor Day celebration will be held Monday, September 5. The day’s activities begin with the parade at 10.

Judging of the parade will take place in the ball park as will the rest of the day’s activities. The queen and princesses will be introduced and presented their gifts. There will be races of all kinds, for all ages, with prizes awarded each group.

A baseball game between the old Black Diamond soccer team and baseball team will be a feature of the afternoon. A greased pole climbing contest will be held for the 14 year-olds and under.

These activities are supported by donations from the people of Black Diamond and vicinity.

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