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Posts Tagged ‘labor relations’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, March 2007

Howard Botts

Howard Botts

Black Diamond is my favorite subject since I’ve lived there all my life. I think these two towns, Maple Valley and Black Diamond, have some things in common; a couple of them are Highway 169 and railroads.

People in Seattle heard that the Northern Pacific was coming to this area and going to Tacoma.

They felt if they couldn’t have that they were going to build their own railroad from Seattle to Walla Walla over the pass. So they started in 1873, got as far as Renton in 1876; then extended it to Newcastle. In 1880 Henry Villard, of the Northern Pacific, bought it from the Black Diamond Coal Company and renamed it the Columbia & Puget Sound Railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 18, 2014

By Bill Kombol

The United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) were first organized on January 25, 1890. At one time this union was the most powerful in America.

From 1920 through 1960 the UMWA coal miners were led by John L. Lewis, a persuasive labor leader who founded, the Congress of Industrial Organizations, better known as the second half of the acronym AFL-CIO. Coal mine union membership peaked in 1946 at 500,000 but has since dipped to under to under 75,000, only 20,000 of whom are active coal miners. (more…)

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Originally published in Valley Living, October 9, 1987

By Peggy Ziebarth
Valley Living Editor

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

Neely Mansion in Auburn is high on Palmer’s list of favorite local landmarks.

“Every time an old house goes, a part of me goes with it,” says Dan Palmer, shuffling through a stack of photographs of historic landmarks scattered over the Valley.

“I can take it when nature takes them, but when it’s the bulldozers…,” Palmer’s voice softens in regret.

Palmer, a folk musician and craftsman by trade, really started getting serious about Valley history when he moved to Black Diamond. And as his interest grew, he started accumulating articles and books on the area’s roots and mounting his own collection of photographs of buildings still standing and the overgrown remnants of a boisterous coal mining past. (more…)

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Originally published in the Enumclaw Courier-Herald, September 27, 1935

Coal mines in the Enumclaw district were stilled this week with the announcement of the nationwide soft coal miners strike. The local union members joined in the nationwide strike and about 2,000 miners in this state are now on strike. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, September 26, 1924

Diamond Briquets were recently given wide and favorable publicity in Juneau, Alaska, when Harold Lloyd appeared in the film feature, Why Worry, at one of the Juneau theatres. H.G. Walmsley, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s depot at the Alaskan capital, arranged with the exhibitors of this picture to place fifteen of these 16-foot signs about the city.

Dealers handling Diamond Briquets, from Skagway, Alaska, in the north, to Hornbrook, California, in the south, all report no worries with this popular fuel. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, September 9, 1914

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

Pete Frederickson, Black Diamond butcher, won the prize for the most handsomely decorated auto.

That the team entered by the local miners’ union was victorious in the mine rescue and first aid meet held in Black Diamond on Labor Day, defeating the fire bosses’ team organized by the mine operators, is the report to Seattle by William Short, state district secretary of the United Mine Workers, who served as master of ceremonies at Black Diamond’s celebration of the holiday. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, September 2, 1958

A plaque was placed on a cement-encased stump in a field near Black Diamond yesterday, commemorating it as the rallying point where 200 miners met May 15, 1907, and organized Local 2257, United Mine Workers of America. Albert Donati, president of Local 6487, placed the plaque. Standing on the stump were, from left, Fred Roberts, Sam Nicholls, and William C. Lewis. Roberts and Lewis signed their names to the charter on the stump the day the local was founded. Nicholls is president of District 10, United Mine Workers.

A plaque was placed on a cement-encased stump in a field near Black Diamond yesterday, commemorating it as the rallying point where 200 miners met May 15, 1907, and organized Local 2257, United Mine Workers of America. Albert Donati, president of Local 6487, placed the plaque. Standing on the stump were, from left, Fred Roberts, Sam Nicholls, and William C. Lewis. Roberts and Lewis signed their names to the charter on the stump the day the local was founded. Nicholls is president of District 10, United Mine Workers.

A decaying tree stump in a field near Black Diamond was the rallying point for miners of the area yesterday during the annual Labor Day celebration.

The old stump, now encased in cement, was the spot where 200 miners met on May 15, 1907, to organize Local 2257, United Mine Workers of America. (more…)

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