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Posts Tagged ‘labor relations’

Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 14, 1921

On another page of this issue of the Bulletin is a tabulation showing the daily average coal production of our mines last week.

The employees of the company who have been following the figures weekly—and of course each one interested in his work has—will see something significant in the totals presented.

In no week since the mines reopened has the company failed to show a steady gain in tonnage over the preceding week.

Sometimes, it is true, the increase was slight owing to the fact that difficulties were encountered for which neither the company nor its new employees were responsible; but whatever the figures they never failed to exceed those previously printed in the Bulletin. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, November 8, 1923

October was a banner month in the production department, and demonstrated that the mines and the new forces are prepared to do their part at any time the coal market returns to normal.

All previous production per man per day records were exceeded at Black Diamond, Burnett, and Newcastle, and at Burnett the total hoist for the month passed anything in the history of the mine.

These gratifying results were achieved because every man from the highest supervisor to the lowest laborer was on his toes and because everyone took an intense and a sincere interest in doing his particular part in showing what “we” can do. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1904

The Pacific Coast Company has inaugurated an eight-hour day and raised wages of all laborers in its mines.

The changes are made effective October 1.

The increase is voluntary on the part of the company and was made without application by the men. In fact, the first intimation the men had of the changed conditions was given when notices were posted under the direction of Chief Engineer James Anderson announcing the higher scale was effective. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, October 4, 1919

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road fronting the building is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

Hall at Newcastle’s Uniontown—Morganville’s sister “city”—which was constructed during the coal miners’ lockout in 1922. The road in the foreground is May Creek Park Dr, the road described in this article, near its junction with the Renton-Newcastle Rd—now known as Coal Creek Parkway.

After a fight with the Board of County Commissioners that has lasted twelve years, the residents of Bartram Junction, three miles northeast of Renton on the Newcastle branch of the Pacific Coast Railroad, are to have a road outlet to the highways of the county.

The county board yesterday received from the State Public Service Commission permission to construct a temporary grade crossing over the railroad and Commissioner Thomas Dobson of the North District said today that one-half of the one-mile road from the Newcastle highway to Bartram will he constructed this year and that it will be finished next spring at an approximate cost of $2,500. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, September 9, 1900

Want ten cents per car more

Outside or common laborers asked for a raise from S2.25 to $2.50 a day—coal mine owners declare that the property will lie idle if they cannot find men willing to work for the old wages

As a result of the denial of their demand for an increase of wages 150 miners in the employ of the Seattle-San Francisco Railway & Navigation Company, at Leary, this county, went out on a strike Friday. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, August 30, 1923

When Dr. Edward T. Devine, member of the United States Coal Commission, visited the coal mining districts of the West last week, he spent one day on a tour of the mines in King and Pierce counties.

In the group above he is shown at Burnett with a number of Pacific Coast Coal Company employees, who, with Vice President N.D. Moore and Manager of Mines D.C. Botting, accompanied him on his visit to Newcastle, Black Diamond, and Burnett, as well as to Carbonado and Wilkeson. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 11, 1913

Men employed in collieries of Pacific Coast Company quit in sympathy with discharged committeeman

Organization growing about Black Diamond

Seven hundred miners employed in the three collieries of the Pacific Coast Company at Black Diamond walked out this morning because the company had refused to reinstate George Ayers, a member of the “pit committee,” reputed to be an I.W.W. organizer in the Black Diamond district.

Ayers was discharged following a quarrel with a subforman named Mitchell, with whom he had taken up a grievance of a miner who had not been supplied with a “bucker.” Ayers is said to have become abusive when Mitchell told him that he had no authority to regulate employment. (more…)

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