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Posts Tagged ‘Lake Lucerne’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 7, 1937

The pig squealed and the chickens laid eggs.

And so Charles O’Shea, 29 years old, a glazier, was in the city jail today, accused of the theft off fifteen chickens and a pig from a farm near Lake Lucerne early yesterday.

Police here were notified of the theft by Kent police, who said the thief made off with the assorted livestock in an automobile. Detective Lieuts. A.T. Greathouse and M.J. Lowery, noticed a machine in Minor Avenue at Pike Street yesterday afternoon, with feathers strewn about the upholstery and eggs scattered on the back seat. They arrested O’Shea, who was the wheel. But the livestock was gone.

“The pig squealed so much he made me nervous, and the chickens laid eggs on the seats, and I released the whole outfit,” O’Shea told the officers.

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 2000

By Barbara Nilson

Photos by Sherrie Acker

The “action” in the 1920s to 1950s, from Seattle south, was at the lake resorts in the Valley. Memories of those glory days were shared at the March program with Dolores Gaffney and Janet Bertagni talking about Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness resort, and Gloria Foss remembering the family’s resort on Shadow Lake.

Lake Wilderness resorts

Attending the historical society program on resorts were, from left, Janet Bertagni, Dolores Gaffney Judge, and Bernadine Gaffney Gebenini.

Dolores Gaffney, daughter of Tom Gaffney, reported her father and his brother Kain purchased the property on Lake Wilderness in 1926 from Abraham and Sam Cohen. The family moved to the lake and the resort opened in the spring of 1927 as Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness.

At that time there were three small family resorts on the lake. Dieckman with his two sons, Jeff and Don, had just started one, and across the lake was McKinney’s. McKinney’s also had a dance hall that was two stories high that they eventually turned into a skating rink. In April 1939 McKinneys sold their place to Gaffneys.

One of the older buildings was used for a dance hall, said Dolores, and they used kerosene lamps. In 1936 they built a new dance hall after the old one burned down. They had a 30-foot-high diving board as well as cabins, tennis courts, picnic areas, ball fields, and playgrounds.

In 1949 Diekmans and Gaffneys were combined and the Gaffneys decided to build a lodge. The design was developed by Young, Richardson and Carlson and won the grand prize from the Washington Chapter of Architects in 1951 and the top award from the American Institute in New York in 1952. The center column totem pole was carved by the famous Doug McCarter. It is 35 feet tall and weighs ten tons. (more…)

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Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, December 2007

Collected by Barbara Nilson

Christmas lists for Santa were very different 70-80 years ago. They were more wish list that never came because the Depression was rampant and an orange in one’s stocking was a wonderful, glorious discovery on Christmas morn.

The Christmas that June (Corkins) Kuhuski most remembered was in 1930. She was 10 years old and scanned the Sears Wish book and found this wonderful “Patty” doll. She said she knew it would be her last doll because she was getting older. She showed the picture to her mother who responded, “That is too expensive, better pick another one.”It was all of $2.00.

So June picked a less expensive one but really had her heart set on “Patty.” (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 19, 1927

Delightful spot, only 28 miles distant, is called a bit of Switzerland at door of Seattle

By Ellis Coe

1—Stretch of pavement through Maple Valley—the Reo Wolverine with Fred Lamping at the wheel. The tall maples towering overhead offer shade and hazards as well for the new Maple Valley Golf and Country Club seen in the background. 2—Rustic wood bridge dividing Lake Lucerne from the upper lake, formerly Pipe Lake. Both lakes are generally known now as Lake Lucerne. The clearing in the foreground is to be landscaped and on it will be built a summer home for W.T. Burwell. 3—Placid Lake Lucerne from the north shore looking toward the picnic groves with the hostess house and the canoe house in view. Fred Lamping and Miss Times Representative are seen contentedly paddling about in the canoe. 4—Entrance to Lucerne fashioned from the giant firs. The pillars present an imposing appearance that impresses one with the rustic beauty that awaits as one continues on through the gateway.

1—Stretch of pavement through Maple Valley—the Reo Wolverine with Fred Lamping at the wheel. The tall maples towering overhead offer shade and hazards as well for the new Maple Valley Golf and Country Club seen in the background. 2—Rustic wood bridge dividing Lake Lucerne from the upper lake, formerly Pipe Lake. Both lakes are generally known now as Lake Lucerne. The clearing in the foreground is to be landscaped and on it will be built a summer home for W.T. Burwell. 3—Placid Lake Lucerne from the north shore looking toward the picnic groves with the hostess house and the canoe house in view. Fred Lamping and Miss Times Representative are seen contentedly paddling about in the canoe. 4—Entrance to Lucerne fashioned from the giant firs. The pillars present an imposing appearance that impresses one with the rustic beauty that awaits as one continues on through the gateway.

Beautiful Lake Lucerne—and after one visits it the adjective seems to become a passion. The more often it is repeated the more beautiful it seems. It is often said of Lucerne that it is a bit of Switzerland almost at the side door of Seattle.

Thousands of motorists of the Northwest clamber for a bit of nature’s rare beauty. They drive miles upon miles to seek it. By following the map on this page, within less than an hour of easy driving, as one goes through the rustic way to Lucerne there will be unfolded one of the real gems of scenic grandeur in the Northwest. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, November 15, 1964

By Rod Cardwell

Down the Road a PieceIt was called “Lavender Town,” a Japanese settlement near the great lumber mill that flourished in Selleck … east out of Kent in the King County uplands that swing gradually into the Cascade Range.

And the women would appear outside among the flowers in their colorful kimonos, many in shades of purple … and the children came home from the English-speaking school to receive instruction in Japanese.

Today, Lavender Town, where the men went forth to labor for the Pacific States Lumber Co., is only a memory. … The mill, after fires and labor strife, ceased to operate just before World War II. … And with Pearl Harbor came the removal of the Japanese to camps far inland. Later, although peace prevailed and a mood of hate and suspicion had vanished, most of them never returned. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, May 15, 1930

Association of owners aims at public benefit

Group forms nucleus of state-wide body; fifty members on roster in King, Pierce, Thurston

Lake Wilderness GroveForming the nucleus of a state-wide organization, principal resort owners of King, Pierce, and Thurston counties have recently instituted the Washington Outing Resort Association, comprising more than fifty member resorts within the three counties.

Resorts included in the membership consist mostly of the many lakeshore places that abound to the south of Seattle. O.G. Campbell of Lake Killarney is president of the new organization.

Resort owners prominent in the the movement have given as the reason for the formation of such an organization, the recognition on the part of the operators themselves of the need of closer unity with one another in an effort to better the operation of their resorts for the benefit of the public. (more…)

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