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Posts Tagged ‘Lake Meridian’

Originally published in the MVHS Bugle, May 2000

By Barbara Nilson

Photos by Sherrie Acker

The “action” in the 1920s to 1950s, from Seattle south, was at the lake resorts in the Valley. Memories of those glory days were shared at the March program with Dolores Gaffney and Janet Bertagni talking about Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness resort, and Gloria Foss remembering the family’s resort on Shadow Lake.

Lake Wilderness resorts

Attending the historical society program on resorts were, from left, Janet Bertagni, Dolores Gaffney Judge, and Bernadine Gaffney Gebenini.

Dolores Gaffney, daughter of Tom Gaffney, reported her father and his brother Kain purchased the property on Lake Wilderness in 1926 from Abraham and Sam Cohen. The family moved to the lake and the resort opened in the spring of 1927 as Gaffney’s Lake Wilderness.

At that time there were three small family resorts on the lake. Dieckman with his two sons, Jeff and Don, had just started one, and across the lake was McKinney’s. McKinney’s also had a dance hall that was two stories high that they eventually turned into a skating rink. In April 1939 McKinneys sold their place to Gaffneys.

One of the older buildings was used for a dance hall, said Dolores, and they used kerosene lamps. In 1936 they built a new dance hall after the old one burned down. They had a 30-foot-high diving board as well as cabins, tennis courts, picnic areas, ball fields, and playgrounds.

In 1949 Diekmans and Gaffneys were combined and the Gaffneys decided to build a lodge. The design was developed by Young, Richardson and Carlson and won the grand prize from the Washington Chapter of Architects in 1951 and the top award from the American Institute in New York in 1952. The center column totem pole was carved by the famous Doug McCarter. It is 35 feet tall and weighs ten tons. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, May 21, 1925

When Portland, Oregon, recently held its Home Beautiful Exposition, Ralph C. Dean, manager of the Pacific Coast Coal Company’s Portland Depot, lost no time in demonstrating to the citizens of the Columbia River metropolis that Diamond Briquets were the ideal fuel to make beautiful homes comfortable as well.

This picture shows the booth which was arranged by R.R. English, city salesman, and which carried the message of Diamond Briquets to many Portland homes. (more…)

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With the arrival of hot summer weather attention is again drawn to the fact that there are many residents of Black Diamond who have no effective means of disposing of garbage. At the last Mine Council meeting a move was instituted to improve the sanitary condition of the camp by asking everybody to provide themselves with garbage cans.

The company will provide a means for regularly disposing of all garbage deposited in cans, free of cost, and in order to make the entire camp fully sanitary it is absolutely necessary that every house be equipped with the proper type of garbage can. These may be obtained through the company store, and in case they are not installed promptly, steps will be taken to compel every resident to so equip his place.

At both Newcastle and Burnett every house is equipped with a garbage can and the menace of typhoid and contagion thereby greatly minimized. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 22, 1992

By Barbara Nilson

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Boundary lines for a proposed Cedar County were tentatively set last week, according to Dave Fields, spokesman for a group of six dissenters who are “fed up” with King County’s dominance over unincorporated areas.

The proposed county would stretch from the Snohomish County line and from the North Bend area as far west as the border of King County Fire District 43 and the east edge of Lake Youngs.

It would include the towns of Duvall, Carnation, Black Diamond, and Enumclaw. Also included would be the unincorporated areas of eastern King County, including Maple Valley and Covington without Lake Meridian. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, June 29, 1924

By Ellis Coe

One of the most attractive short trips of the many that are available to Seattle motorists is that leading to Lake Sawyer, reached from this city by way of Kent or Auburn. Much of the highway is paved and the remainder is good gravel. Only in one or two places is the road being surfaced and no trouble is encountered in driving through. 1—A strip of woodland road leading to Lake Sawyer. 2—A picturesque island in the lake.

One of the most attractive short trips of the many that are available to Seattle motorists is that leading to Lake Sawyer, reached from this city by way of Kent or Auburn. Much of the highway is paved and the remainder is good gravel. Only in one or two places is the road being surfaced and no trouble is encountered in driving through. 1—A strip of woodland road leading to Lake Sawyer. 2—A picturesque island in the lake.

Lake retreat calls camper to its shores

Beauty spot, reached by way of Kent, is popular place for Sunday motor parties

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, juvenile heroes of Mark Twain’s famous novels, are said to have spent their most enjoyable hours during dog days, when the summer sun beat down on the woods and prairies and the dogs “went mad.” During those days, the pair disported themselves at the old swimmin’ hole and in the wild berry patches, young Sawyer unencumbered with school duties and Huck Finn enjoying his usual year-‘round liberties.

Lake Sawyer, some distance beyond the end of the pavement leading out of Kent, might well have been named after Tom Sawyer. It is a paradise for boys, young and old. Girls, also young and old, find keen enjoyment there. (more…)

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Originally published in the Tacoma News Tribune, November 15, 1964

By Rod Cardwell

Down the Road a PieceIt was called “Lavender Town,” a Japanese settlement near the great lumber mill that flourished in Selleck … east out of Kent in the King County uplands that swing gradually into the Cascade Range.

And the women would appear outside among the flowers in their colorful kimonos, many in shades of purple … and the children came home from the English-speaking school to receive instruction in Japanese.

Today, Lavender Town, where the men went forth to labor for the Pacific States Lumber Co., is only a memory. … The mill, after fires and labor strife, ceased to operate just before World War II. … And with Pearl Harbor came the removal of the Japanese to camps far inland. Later, although peace prevailed and a mood of hate and suspicion had vanished, most of them never returned. (more…)

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Originally published in the Valley Daily News, July 15, 1992

By Anthony K. Albert

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

Valley Daily News graphic by Steve Nolan.

MAPLE VALLEY — The Cedar County Coalition launched its effort to secede from King County Tuesday when it revealed its proposal for new county boundaries.

It would be the third attempt to secede from King County in two decades.

According to Dave Fields, one of the coalition’s six members, Cedar County would include all of eastern King County, as far west as the western border of King County Fire District 43, and the east edge of the Lake Youngs.

It would include the cities of Duvall, Carnation, Black Diamond and Enumclaw—its urban centers—and Maple Valley and Covington areas, minus Lake Meridian. Fields estimated Cedar County’s population would be about 65,000. (more…)

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