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Posts Tagged ‘Lake Sawyer’

Maple Valley Historical Society, March 1987

Here’s where me and the railroad got together.

My brother went up to Maple Valley for some reason or other and saw this gang of railroad men working to save the track that was being washed out. Being nosy, he went up to the foreman and asked if they were hiring anybody and he said yes, and get anyone else you can.

He came home and got me and we started work filling gunny sacks with sand at 4:00 p.m. and didn’t stop til 4:00 p.m. the next day. The rain never let up and gunny sacks got hard to get because everyone else needed them too for the same reason we did. We wound up using sacks that had been filled with rock salt and the salt cut our hands making them very sore. We didn’t have the little bags they use nowadays but the 100-pound size which we about two-thirds filled. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, March 7, 1979

(This is the second in a series of feature articles written by students in Tahoma’s Beginning Journalism class. Steve Eichelberger, a senior, lives in Hobart where he became acquainted with Dorothy Iverson. She remembers when her small community housed the largest lumber mill in the Northwest.)

By Steve Eichelberger

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

Dorothy Iverson and her son, Warren, at their Hobart store. Dorothy remembers Hobart in the days of its lumber mill and the Hobart Bunk-Hotel.

For many years, Dorothy Iverson was a homemaker.

“Women didn’t work in those days,” she said about her early life in Hobart. Mrs. Iverson was born in Seattle where she lived with her three older brothers and three younger sisters before moving to Hobart while in the seventh grade.

She remains there today where she still helps operate the Hobart store.

Mrs. Iverson attended school in what is now the Hobart Grange and graduated from Tahoma, where she had been editor of the high school newspaper and class valedictorian.

She attended Wilson Business College in Seattle and after graduation was a secretary in Seattle for four years.

She married the late Iver Iverson in 1933 and they set up housekeeping in Hobart. Iver was employed at his father’s grocery store, the “Wood and Iverson Grocery Store,” where he continued to work until it burned in 1939. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, November 19, 1988

By Julie Schuster

BLACK DIAMOND—Doris Campbell, a stoical woman of few words, gave the Black Diamond bank teller a handwritten note: “In protest of personnel management practices and the discharge of Dave Miller.”

A few minutes later, Campbell walked out with her entire savings. (more…)

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Originally published in the Globe News, October 31, 1973

By our county news bureau

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The city of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A proposed Black Diamond-Lake Sawyer interceptor would start at the west city limits, extend north past the western shores of Lake Sawyer, turn west of 272 St. SE and extend to Timberlane at the Covington Pump Station where it would join the existing Cascade Sewer System force main extending into Kent. The City of Black Diamond, the Lake Sawyer, Lake Wilderness and Pipe Lake areas would be required to provide local sewerage collection before connecting to the main interceptor.

A sewerage system planned but dropped three or four years ago is once more underway, county officials announced this week.

The area to be served by the projected $1 million system is east of Auburn at Black Diamond, Lake Morton, and Lake Sawyer, where pollution problems have been increasing due to inadequate septic tank drain fields and growing population pressures. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, August 18, 1928

Vacationist may find ideal spot less than hour’s drive from Seattle—if he looks closely

Try to paint this picture. Lovely Lake Sawyer is one of the most popular vacation resorts in the Northwest. Less than an hour’s drive from Seattle, Lake Sawyer is ideal for an afternoon outing and picnic. Lake Sawyer Paradise, under the direction of Mrs. Anita Campbell, is one of the very fine resorts situated on the shores of the lake, splendidly equipped with cottages, boats, canoes, picnic groves, and other essentials to a delightful vacation.

Try to paint this picture. Lovely Lake Sawyer is one of the most popular vacation resorts in the Northwest. Less than an hour’s drive from Seattle, Lake Sawyer is ideal for an afternoon outing and picnic. Lake Sawyer Paradise, under the direction of Mrs. Anita Campbell, is one of the very fine resorts situated on the shores of the lake, splendidly equipped with cottages, boats, canoes, picnic groves, and other essentials to a delightful vacation.

No wonder the Eastern visitor to the Northwest exclaims at the wonderful scenery and wealth of lakes and rivers that abound here. It is beyond the understanding of most of us who have lived here for the greater part of our lives.

The outstanding feature, according to some of the tourists is the places in which one will find a bevy of lakes. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Sunday Times, July 20, 1902

He may be in the woods near Sawyer Lake or he may be miles away—No one knows

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

Tracy has apparently dropped as completely out of sight as though the earth had opened and swallowed him. Since his disappearance from the cabin on the shores of Lake Sawyer last Wednesday afternoon, or night, no trace of him has been had.

His long silence and failure to appear at some house for food and clothing lends weight to the opinion of Sheriff Cudihee that Tracy is still in hiding in the vicinity of the lake. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, July 18, 1902

Everything moved out and no scent for the hounds

Detailed story of the chase of the past few days

By Larris Cain

Harry Tracy mugshot

Harry Tracy mugshot

The elusive Tracy has again given Sheriff Cudihee and his posse of picked men the slip, and has succeeded in escaping from one of the most cleverly laid plans to effect his capture that has been resorted to since his escape from the Oregon penitentiary.

Since last Saturday Tracy has occupied a deserted cabin on the east shore of Lake Sawyer, which is situated about midway between Covington, a small station on the Palmer cut-off, and Black Diamond. No more ideal hiding place could have been selected, for it is located in the heart of a wilderness which it is almost impossible to penetrate.

No more strategic location could have been desired, as it stood on a high part of the bank of the lake, which gave its occupant a sweeping view of that body of water; and any one approaching the cabin from that side could have been seen for at least a mile up and down its shores. To the rear is a wild forest with here and there a small path almost invisible on account of the recent growth of small brush. (more…)

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