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Posts Tagged ‘Lake Washington’

Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, January 24, 1915

Pacific Coast Company now using South Prairie products in plant

Diamond BriquetsFollowing the successful introduction of Black Diamond coal briquets, the Pacific Coast Coal Company has just placed upon the market a new briquet, made from the coal of the South Prairie mines. Both kinds of briquets are the product of the company’s $225,000 briquetting plant, completed just a few months ago at Briquetville, on the south shore of Lake Washington.

The coal is ground fine, washed, heated, and mixed with liquid asphalt; then stamped into briquets under a pressure of more than two tons to the square inch. In briquet form the fine furnace coal is adapted much better to household use.

Each Black Diamond briquet is marked with a diamond, and each of the new South Prairie briquets with an “N,” as a distinguishing mark.

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Originally published in the Eastside Journal, July 27, 1999

By Tim Larson
Journal reporter

A Newcastle coal train, fatally sidetracked 125 years ago, will spend at least one more winter at the bottom of Lake Washington.

An effort to rescue one of the historic coal cars, led last year by Newcastle Councilman John Dulcich and Councilwoman Pam Lee, is now on the back burner.

“Really, it’s on hold right now,” Dulcich said. “We still plan to do it, but we have other priorities right now.” (more…)

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Prepared for the membership of the PNR-NMRA, September 13, 1958

By H.A. Durfy

Coal—black diamonds—a source of heat, light, power, medicines, and many more products too numerous to mention here. This was the beginning of the Pacific Coast R.R. Co., upon which you are riding today. Of course, like other railroads, the Pacific Coast R.R. Co. was not always known by the present title, and we want to lead you through the background and the beginnings of the railroad. (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Daily Intelligencer, May 18, 1880

One of the most convincing proofs of the steady growth and prosperity of our territory is to be found in the development and increased capacity of our coal mines. And, for an example we will take one, near at hand—the Newcastle mine—situated near Lake Washington, in the central portion of our county to demonstrate this proposition. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, April 28, 1924

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today's Gene Coulon Park.

This photo is from the 1925 P.T.A. visit to Briquetville, near today’s Gene Coulon Park.

Briquet Plant data of interest to you

This plant was opened in 1914 and has run continuously since that time. It operates two shifts of eight hours each and produces five hundred tons of briquets a day. That means that over one and one-half million briquets are made each day.

Camp welcomes you

Through Mrs. Julius Johnson, president Newcastle Circle of the Parent-Teacher Association, its membership numbering 51, joins with the entire camp and the company officials in welcoming the visiting P.T.A. members of King County today. We want you to see the mine and the camp of which we are so proud, and when you leave us, above all, we want you to remember your trip to Newcastle and that your return will be welcomed.

The briquets are made from a combination of Black Diamond and South Prairie coals. The first of these give it its free burning quality and low ash and the last, a coking coal, gives it its strength and fire holding power. The binder used is a specially prepared form of asphalt from which the stickiness has been removed.

The trip through the plant will be in the direction in which the coal is run, beginning at the point where the raw coal is received and ending at the point where the finished briquet goes into the railroad cars.

First, will be seen the unloading hoppers through which the fresh coal will be flowing from the railroad cars. From here the coal goes to the top of the high timber structure known as the “Raw coal bunker.” Through this it is fed down by gravity and in the exact proportion required into the two steel box conveyors which run from this bunker into the steel building ahead, known as the “Dryer Building.”

Before leaving the raw coal bunker, by stepping up the first flight of steps may be seen the “measuring” conveyors which portion out the two grades of coal as the housewife measures the ingredients of a cake. (more…)

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Originally published in the Washington State Historical Society’s quarterly journal, Columbia, Spring 1994

By John Hanscom

Drawing of Franklin, circa 1887.

Bird’s-eye-view map of Franklin Mine and its environs, c. 1890. (Courtesy of Don Mason and the Black Diamond Historical Society.)

Henry Villard launched the Oregon Improvement Company in October 1880 as part of his grand scheme to dominate the development of the Pacific Northwest. By 1883 he had tied the area to the national economy with the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Expansive development of the Pacific Northwest seemed assured.

To fuel Villard’s steamships and locomotives, a dependable coal supply was a high priority. By February 1881 the Oregon Improvement Company had acquired the Seattle Coal and Transportation Company, including the Newcastle Mine east of Lake Washington, at a cost of one million dollars. The Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad (renamed the Columbia and Puget Sound) was also purchased for over half a million dollars to transport coal from mine to Seattle bunkers. Villard hired John L. Howard under a five-year contract at $10,000 per year as general manager of the coal business. (more…)

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Originally published in the Pacific Coast Bulletin, March 20, 1924

For many years fruit growers in the Yakima Valley of Washington and in the Rogue River Valley of Oregon have contested the supremacy of Jack Frost during the blossoming season.

At first smudge pots were used to produce a dense screen of smoke, but lately it has been demonstrated that heat, and not smoke, is needed to check the ravages of the frost. For this purpose Diamond Briquets have been found to be the most efficient and effective fuel. (more…)

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