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Posts Tagged ‘Lake Wilderness’

Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, August 2, 1978

Happy anniversary! The picturesque Maple Valley branch of the King County Library System, shown above, is observing the tenth year at its present location this summer.

Happy anniversary! The picturesque Maple Valley branch of the King County Library System, shown above, is observing the tenth year at its present location this summer.

The present Maple Valley Library building is ten years old this summer.

Librarian Pat Simmons took a few minutes away from her chores this week to tell the Voice a bit about the origin and development of the picturesque building on Highway 169 across from Wilderness Village.

The library opened its doors on July 14, 1968. Construction costs came to $112,000 and were provided by a county bond issue and matching funds from the Federal Library Service and Construction Act. The 4,000-foot building can accommodate 25,000 books. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, July 1995

The old Lake Wilderness Conference building has new tenants and a new name. It is King County’s first community service center and be called Lake Wilderness Community Service Center. A grand opening is planned for August.

The old Lake Wilderness Conference building has new tenants and a new name. It is King County’s first community service center and be called Lake Wilderness Community Service Center. A grand opening is planned for August.

King County’s first Community Service Center located at Lake Wilderness Park in Maple Valley opens Wednesday, July 5, 1995 at 12 noon. King County Executive Gary Locke and community members will visit the Center at 1 p.m. A grand opening celebration will occur later in August. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Daily Times, June 14, 1950

The sleek waters of Lake Wilderness beckon vacationers either for a refreshing swim or shoving off for a row. The latter activity is exactly what Elaine Borell and Shirley Demko, students of Buckley Division, White River High School are enjoying.— Times photo by Royal Crooks.

The sleek waters of Lake Wilderness beckon vacationers either for a refreshing swim or shoving off for a row. The latter activity is exactly what Elaine Borell and Shirley Demko, students of Buckley Division, White River High School are enjoying.— Times photo by Royal Crooks.

Newest of resort hotels within a few miles of Seattle is Lake Wilderness Lodge, scheduled for completion this month as an addition to Kain Gaffney’s large picnic park on the west shore of Lake Wilderness.

With an eye to enticing air travelers of the future, Gaffney has installed a convenient air strip immediately adjoining the building and provided ample tie-down space for planes

An investment of $250,000 is represented in the hotel and landing field. The building, of modern design, has walls mainly of glass. Every room looks out upon the lake, with its wooded shore line and numerous boats. There are but 12 rooms for overnight guests, but large dinner groups will be welcome. The regular dining room has a seating capacity of 140; banquet rooms on the ground floor will accommodate 400 and catering will be geared to accommodate conventions.

In order to use advantageously the sloping site on the shore, the lodge has been constructed on four floor levels, centered around a staircase of spectacular design, circling a mammoth totem pole, ax-carved by the sculptor, Dudley Carter. The huge timber is four feet in diameter and 30 feet from base to top, with designs its entire length.

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, June 7, 1978

The following material has been presented to the Voice by Ann Phinney after the sale of the Phinney part of the “Burtenshaw property” they owned many years.

“This is the history of the Burtenshaw homestead as written by the oldest daughter, Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian, and given to us July 6, 1953, after we bought the homestead in the summer of 1951,” Mrs. Phinney says.

By Estella Burtenshaw Macmillian

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

Though showing inevitable ravages of time, this Burtenshaw barn still stands on its original site off S.E. 216th in Maple Valley. Voice photo by Bob Gerbing.

William A. Burtenshaw came to Washington Territory from Oregon, driving a team of horses across the country by the Overland route.

During the winter of 1884 he drove the first team of horses into Maple Valley, where previous to this time there were but two yoke of oxen.

He filed on the homestead of 120 acres situated twelve miles east of Renton (This land extended up to and included the little house, which used to be the Shaw’s store, by the now Junior High—note by AHP.)

The family lived in a tent two years. In 1886 he built the first house. Soon after that he built the first part of the barn. A few years later he added the larger part. (more…)

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Originally published in The Seattle Times, May 21, 1980

By Cathy Reiner
south Times bureau

Scoutmaster Lyle Lewis works on a canoe with Joe Taylor, left, and Robert Wraith.

Scoutmaster Lyle Lewis works on a canoe with Joe Taylor, left, and Robert Wraith.

MAPLE VALLEY — “Boom-crunch, boom-crunch-crackle-boom!”

In the echoing garage the noise was almost deafening as Lyle Lewis and three members of Boy Scout Post 711 beat their rubber mallets on a misshapen fiberglass form.

“Boom-thump-crunch-boom!”

An unusual Scout ceremony? No, just the birth of another of the troop’s canoes.

“That’s it,” Joe Taylor, 17, announced with a grin. “Pull ’er off.”

Scoutmaster Lyle Lewis eased a wedge between the form and the yellow fiberglass skin and began pulling from the edge. There was a shudder and a pop and suddenly the form was on the ground. Underneath, a bright yellow canoe was born.

“That’s number 12,” Lewis said with satisfaction. “It’s ready to send home for finishing work.” (more…)

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Originally published in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, May 7, 1961

One of the highlights at big festival: Queen Darlene Jones and Princess Sandy Di Martino in pony carts. (Post-Intelligencer photos by Phil H. Webber.)

One of the highlights at big festival: Queen Darlene Jones and Princess Sandy Di Martino in pony carts. (Post-Intelligencer photos by Phil H. Webber.)

Maple Valley paraded its progress yesterday along trails cut by cows in the days when the guests of honor were young pioneers there.

In the reviewing stand were some who remember those pioneer days and others who are descended from founders of the community, first settled in 1879. (more…)

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Originally published in the Voice of the Valley, May 2, 1979

By Mondell Merlini
Maple Valley Sport Shop

Over 400 breakfasts of hot cakes and ham and eggs were served on Opening Day of the fishing season by Maple Valley Lions at Wilderness Park. Above is shown the Lions’ “kitchen and dining hall.” Co-chairmen <strong>Tony Merlini</strong> and <strong>Allan Petchnick</strong> said they’re grateful to all Lions, their families, and friends for a job well done. Special thanks were given to several Tahoma High girls for their assistance (seems they just couldn’t say no to Lion Jack Schuster). Proceeds of this fund-raising project will be used for local community Lions’ projects such as scholarships, eye exams for needy children, and sponsorship of youth sports programs.

Over 400 breakfasts of hot cakes and ham and eggs were served on Opening Day of the fishing season by Maple Valley Lions at Wilderness Park. Above is shown the Lions’ “kitchen and dining hall.” Co-chairmen Tony Merlini and Allan Petchnick said they’re grateful to all Lions, their families, and friends for a job well done. Special thanks were given to several Tahoma High girls for their assistance (seems they just couldn’t say no to Lion Jack Schuster). Proceeds of this fund-raising project will be used for local community Lions’ projects such as scholarships, eye exams for needy children, and sponsorship of youth sports programs.

Most of you probably would like to forget the Opening Day. It wasn’t all that great. Neither were my predictions. They were awful. I don’t think I’ll do that again.

But for this week I am committed to giving you an Opening Day report. None of the lakes were exceptionally good. In fact, most of them were bad. Of the four lakes that I listed last week as being good openers, only one made any kind of showing and that was Lake Twelve. (more…)

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